Recently at Reason.tv: 3 Reasons to Legalize Pot Now!

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As the United States enters its 72nd year of marijuana prohibition, it's time to consider legalizing pot once and for all, for at least three reasons:

1. The tax revenue and savings in law enforcement costs. A 2005 cost-benefit analysis done by Harvard economist Jeffrey Miron found that legalizing marijuana and taxing it similar to alcohol would generate over $6 billion in new revenue and save nearly $8 billion in direct law enforcement costs. Pot is already the biggest cash crop in many states; bringing it into the open market would pump all sorts of energy into the economy.

2. It's going to happen anyway, so why delay the inevitable? Increasing numbers of Americans realize that pot prohibition is an ineffective and costly policy. A 2009 poll by Zogby found that 52 percent of Americans agreed that marijuana should be taxed and regulated like booze. A Field Poll last year of California residents, who will vote on a legalization ballot initiative in the fall, found that 56 percent wanted legalization. Other polls show historically high percentages favoring legalization. In a world of busted budgets, it's crystal clear that spending time and energy policing marijuana is not worth it.

3. Keep Your Laws Off Our Bodies. Never mind that by virtually every measure, pot is safer and less than disruptive than booze. Pot prohibition in the 1930s was the result of hysteria, not serious threats to society. We own our bodies and should be free to eat, drink, and smoke what we want. And to take responsibility for our actions, whether we're straight or we're stoned.

Approximately 2.30 minutes long. Written and produced by Meredith Bragg and Nick Gillespie, who also hosts.

Go to Reason.tv for downloadable versions.

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  1. An argument for the enlargement-via-enrichment of the state based on Historical Inevitability is nine drinks.

  2. Outdated archaic laws die slow in America. It is time we legalize,regulate and tax. Marijuana is not going away. EVER.

    1. We need the marijuana laws. We are in a recession and prisons provide a good source of jobs, especially in rural areas. Marijuana has been illegal a long time, that’s the way it is, we can’t change something we have been doing for like endless.

      1. GIMME BACK MY SLAVES!

    2. Wait, wait. Why do legalization arguments – even on Reason, for fuck’s sake! – always contain some form of “regulate and tax it” or “tax the hell out of it,” or somesuch? We’re libertarians here, right?

      Besides, why do we need to “regulate” marijuana? It couldn’t be any *less* regulated now, and it’s not like people are getting hurt by unregulated marijuana.

      And what business do we have saying “tax it like alcohol” when we’re also saying (correctly) that pot is much safer to the user and to innocent bystanders than alcohol?

      There are liberal arguments in favor of legalization. There are conservative arguments in favor of legalization. There are libertarian arguments in favor of legalization. Is it too much to ask that libertarians not make liberal arguments? We’ve got a chance to move the ball downfield towards liberty, and we fumble it by replacing one group of government employees (prison guards) with another (marijuana-regulation bureaucrats). So weird.

      1. Agree wholeheartedly. The “legalize and tax it” argument is a halfway approach, a compromise. It appeals to the pragmatist wing of the libertarian race, as well as to mainstream Americans who cannot conceive of a product that is not liable to taxation. Rather than celebrate liberty and the freedom to choose what one puts in one’s own body, this approach reinforces the concept that the state is a dispenser of rights, not a protector.

        1. Though I agree in theory, thevsingle largest problem with attracting other liberty minded friends is that too many libertarians are too concerned with philosophical purity and not political pragmatics. You’re essentially saying that keeping it illegal is a better option than legalizing and taxing because it doesn’t go all the way to legal and completely unregulated.

          And that’s just ridiculous.

          Sometimes liberty must be regained in small steps. And better in small steps than 0-never-thirty because we libs are too stupid to take a pony ride when it’s offered because we’re waiting for a unicorn.

      2. Exactly what you said.

  3. Keep Your Laws Off Our Bodies. Never mind that by virtually every measure, pot is safer and less than disruptive than booze.

    I take issue with this, sure it is safer, but look at all the harm booze does, do we need to add another dangerous intoxicant to the mix. With booze it is too late, the cats out of the bag. Also, regardless of supposed safety, marijuana is not harmless and especially in this day and age of universal health insurance we all pay for each others health care and have a right to have laws to keep us healthy to minimize cost.

    1. do we need to add another dangerous intoxicant to the mix.

      this is not a ratcheting effect. risky people will continue to take risks, non risky people will continue to act responsibly. Drug availability does not change people’s basic behavior. Legalizing pot, heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, etc will not increase by any significant amount the number of dependent users, it will just change the number of drugs certain people are dependent to.

      And screw universal healthcare, the overall cost of government would probably plummet in any case if we stop sending 10% of the nation through our legal system.

    2. Statistic: One hundred percent of people who breathe air die.

    3. Hmm… I know an awful lot of people who do/did smoke pot and I can’t think of a single one who’s had to seek medical treatment as a result. You want to keep people out of the hospital? Get all these fuckers to stop running marathons. You’re body’s not meant to run that much (unless, perhaps, you’re Kenyan)!

  4. Wuzzup is Juanita!!!

    It is immoral, unhealthy and illegal to take the pot. That is why it is illegal. You want the ‘right’ to get hi, what about my RIGHT to live in a drug free society. Taking drug doesn’t just destroy the user, it destroys the community, it is hardly a victimless crime.

    A drug free world, we can do it.

    J

    1. No we can’t. Pot has been around for centuries and it won’t just vanish like that. Pot is getting more and more popular. and besides, if it were legalized it could produce 6 bil. in revenue and save 8 billlion dollars used for policing it. I am pro as long as it heavily taxed, produces jobs, and strictly regulated.

      1. I am pro as long as it heavily taxed, produces jobs, and strictly regulated.

        Subtle troll is subtle

      2. I don’t agree with “heavy taxation” because it will simply extend the status quo. People are not murdering each other for drugs, they are doing it for money. If the tax burden on pot makes it profitable to continue the black market, then that is exactly what will happen.

    2. Your morals are your concern, not mine.

      My body is my concern, not yours.

      The legality of pot is now in question. What are you gonna do when it’s legal?

      Your rights end at my fucking toes. You want a drug free society? Then go and find a tract of land, buy it and declare it drug-free. Bring others to live there. But damned if you get to demand an entire nation give into your personal preferences.

      1. …my fucking toes.

        Your toes are hard core!

        1. Yes. Yes, they are. XD

  5. Towards a drug-free world – we can do it?

    The world is at a crossroads in the fight against drugs. The Special Session provides us with a choice. We can stay put – or we can, as the American poet Robert Frost said, “take the road less travelled”. It is my belief that the future is now. It is time for a step forward along the path of international cooperation, writes the Executive Director of the United Nations Office for Drug Control and Crime Prevention.

    J

      1. Steff,

        Don’t be so hard on Juanita, or Susan. They are just spoofs, and kind of funny. They are just satirical takes on the Drug Warriors.

        1. ooops, Don’t F$#@ with me when I’m stoned man….:p

        2. And this is why I should never take things too seriously. Thanks. XD

    1. It is my belief that the future is now.

      The future was last week. Guess you missed it.

    2. Just listening her makes me want to get stoned. This woman NEEDS drugs, specifically prescribed by a good Psychologist.
      Alcohol is a drug Juanita, should we go back to prohibition? Asprin is a drug, penicilian is a drug, insulin is a drug….I can go on and on…so whats “drugs” are “allowed” in your “drug free” dream of America? I can take ignorance, I can take consevatists, but F’n fanatical morons just piss me off.

  6. SOMEBODY THINK OF THE CHILDREN? WHAT KIND OF MESSAGE DOES IT SEND IF WE WERE TO CHANGE THE RULES???!!?!?1!!

    1. A cease-and-desist letter is on its way.

    2. As a callow youth, I myself was permanently scarred by the topsy-turvy rules of the road. At first the highway speed limits were fast or sometimes non-existent, then they were dropped to 55 (because it was the only sane, safe, moral speed) and now they’ve gone back up.
      How can a person survive in a world of such outrageous chaos?

  7. 4. Investors can become rich off buying stocks of the manufacturers of Ho Hos, Fritos, and 7-11 Burritos.

    1. If legalization becomes reality, I will be adding Jack in the Box and 7-11 holdings to my portfolio.

  8. Don’t feed the trolls folks. Happy 4/20.

    1. + 1/8 oz

      1. Souldn’t you be down an eighth this late in the day?

        1. I wish, just got done doing a poster presentation now I have to go to work. No playoff hockey either, fucking bummer.

          Finals week is next week so I’m straight edge for awhile. I’m not young enough to party, work, and actually remember stuff for school.

          Happy 420 loserdopians!

  9. I would dearly love to see pot legalized. I don’t smoke pot, or drink alcohol for that matter, as I enjoy being sober, but I don’t begrudge others who like to alter their consciousness as that is their business.

    I really don’t think the ballot in CA will pass, though. Too many moralizers are out there, all straining to put their noses into other’s business.

  10. You freaking pot heads just want the carnage to continue don’t you? Druggies shooting at law enforcement officers who try to prevent children from being recruited into their sordid lifestyle. In my county 95% of the reefer busts lead to meth. You want to take away the most effective tool(marijuana laws) we have to uncover meth labs? You ever seen a 14 year old girl reduced to turning tricks at the truck stop? A 16 year old boy killing his grandparents for meth money? Marijuana is a gateway drug. It is a gateway to hard drugs for the druggie and a gateway for narcotics officers to get to the hard drug dealers.Why is it that in any house full of stoners at least half can rol over on a meth lab or dealer?

    1. You, sir, are an idiot.

      Legalizing MJ has nothing to do with meth.

    2. You lose, douche.

    3. You freaking pot heads just want the carnage to continue don’t you?

      Yes, that is what I want. You got me figured out.

      1. You freaking pot heads DA’s and LEO’s just want the carnage to continue don’t you?

        FIFY

    4. Druggies shooting at law enforcement officers who try to prevent children from being recruited into their sordid lifestyle

      Feature not bug.

      Fellow reasonoids, these are obviously joke trolls. And, if they are not, do they really warrant your time and consideration in responding?

    5. You ever seen a 14 year old girl reduced to turning tricks at the truck stop?

      Ummmm, no? Have you?

      1. She said she was 18 :p

  11. Regarding point #1, let’s not kid ourselves that legalized MJ would bring in any sort of tax windfall. The only reason it is expensive or a large cash crop is because it’s illegal. Legalize it and it basically becomes free because it grows so easily.

    1. And the whole marijuana criminal infrastructure switches over to meth, cheese, meow,heroin, crack and any other poison they can peddle.

      1. There is already a “criminal infrastructure” peddling that stuff though, and meeting or exceeding demand judging by continuously declining prices and increasing purity. It’s a buyer’s market for that stuff.

        So how are all these suddenly unemployed pot sellers going to just create demand for another substance? I don’t really get that argument — there’s no reason to expect that demand for hard drugs would explode if we were to legalize marijuana.

        1. I think that pro-legalization types should not totally discount the “gateway drug” effect.

          Legalization does imply social acceptance and to some extent enjoyment of the mild MJ high will lead people to want to experience more intense highs which is where you get into the more problematic drugs.

          I’m for legalization but let’s not be in denial that legalizing will cause some problems. I think it causes us to be taken less seriously by the general public.

          1. Eh. Maybe. So many people smoke pot now anyway that I’m not sure how much more saturated that gateway-susceptible audience could be. Besides, the supply chain is at least as severe a gateway as the physiological effects of cannabis. If you’re buying pot at a liquor store instead of from a street dealer, you’re much less likely to even encounter a supplier for hard drugs.

            In the end I don’t think drug users are as stupid as we make them out to be: they are perfectly capable of deciding what drugs they’d like to try and seeking them out, no matter what the legal landscape looks like.

          2. I think that pro-legalization types should not totally discount the “gateway drug” effect.

            Legalization does imply social acceptance […]

            Why is alcohol, which is certainly socially accepted, not considered a “gateway” drug? Could it be that the whole notion of a “gateway” drug is a bunch of fear-mongering prohibitionist nonsense?

            1. Coffee was the first recreational drug I enjoyed. Fucking baristas (OK, the local Ladies’ Auxiliary when kindergarten let out) pushing that wicked concoction on me.

          3. I think it’s important to think about what type of MJ user will begin to take up MJ after legalization. This will be a very casual user, and someone who is very afraid of risk. Think about it, if someone is not smoking pot now because of a $100 fine (with little risk of actually getting caught), this person won’t break the law against harder substances that remain illegal.

            The type of people that are prone to abuse, and might fit in your “gateway” theory, are already using.

            1. Ding ding ding! WINNER.

              The only people who would smoke pot if it were legal but aren’t smoking pot now are people who are either:

              (1) Unwilling to break the law;

              (2) Unwilling to go through the expense/hassle of getting it; or

              (3) Are afraid of the health risk of an unregulated drug.

              All three of these will apply to heroin, meth, crack, etc. if marijuana is legalized.

              1. (4)Afraid of loosing their Job or security clearance.
                (5)Afraid of becoming a felon and never getting a decent job at all…

                1. Consequences of #1 and #2.

                  1. So what do you do when you are not masturbating Pete? Are you female? If so. do you charge for this service and if so, how much?

          4. Well then, with that reasoning, Alcohol is a gateway drug.

            1. Absolutely the case. I have maintained for a long time now that the true “gateway drug” (to the extent that concept is even valid, and I’m not convinced it is) is beer.

              You want people to stop smoking pot and moving on to other drugs? Prevent them from trying beer for the first time.

    2. I don’t disagree about the tax revenue, although the enforcement savings shouldn’t be overlooked.

      But I wouldn’t say it “grows so easily” unless you’re growing ditchweed. Growing high-quality stuff is a labor-intensive process that requires a significant equipment investment and considerable knowledge and skill. It’s not as simple as dropping a seed in the ground and waiting a few months.

      Does prohibition inflate the value? Yeah of course. But growing weed isn’t as simple as some make it out to be.

      1. I don’t disagree that there is some skill involved in growing MJ, but I doubt it requires any more skill than growing healthy, tasty tomatoes.

        My guess is it would probably cost a private person about 10 to 15 dollars per pound to produce in a home garden.

      2. There will be NO enforcement savings. You are legalizing 1 drug, not all of them. The same law enforcement agencies will stay in place, weeding out the real killers, meth, crack, heroin…ect.
        However…I would like to point out that I pay $6 for a pack of cigs that costs $75 to produce, $2 profit for manufacturer, and over $3 in taxes…and they are Addictive legal drugs. I can’t quit smoking cigs but I can take or leave pot at a whim. Lets talk about alcohol…lets not, you all get the idea.

  12. But I wouldn’t say it “grows so easily” unless you’re growing ditchweed. Growing high-quality stuff is a labor-intensive process that requires a significant equipment investment and considerable knowledge and skill. It’s not as simple as dropping a seed in the ground and waiting a few months.

    You are correct but the main issue with growing the good stuff is that a lot of extra effort has to be taken to avoid being caught. I’m not saying that with legalization everybody would start growing their own, but rather the costs of production would fall to the point where the price would be too low to really be worth trying to tax.

    1. @wayne, Rum: Yeah don’t get me wrong, I don’t think it would fetch north of $3k per pound on a legal market either. But I do think that demand is high enough, and high-quality production is costly enough, that an equilibrium price would still probably be much higher than that for other agricultural commodities.

      But yeah, in general, cannabis cultivation is going to be a lot less lucrative, and you won’t see people making six figures by cropping out a 5×5 area in their basement several times per year.

      1. In fact, its already a BIG MONEY legal business..for government approved medicinal growers. Hmmm…

    2. No. Think Cigarette taxes in NY. The tax is per pack, not a percentage of the sale price.

      If a pound of weed sold for $10, there’s no reason to believe that NY or some other entity, coould add a $90 tax to that pound. My understanding is that a pound for $100 is still a fantastic deal.

      1. The government can set whatever tax rate they want. In Nevada they have an MJ “tax stamp”, and their advertised tax rate is $100 per gram. That works out to $2850 per ounce. Of course, they won’t actually issue you a tax stamp because selling MJ is illegal.

        I agree with a tax but it has to be reasonable. The government can’t simply substitute itself for the drug cartels because that won’t work.

        Personally, I think a tax on the order of $10 per ounce would be reasonable. How will the government enforce a tax on home-growers?

        1. I can grow tax free tobacco in my back yard now if I wanted to…but I don’t.

      2. Yes, I also think it would be more like excise taxes than sales taxes.

        Roll-your-own tobacco is taxed at $24.78/pound (federally). Even if an excise tax of $90/pound was tacked onto the price, weed will still cost nothing compared to what it goes for now. I’d pay 5.63/oz. in tax for legal weed. Competition will take care of the rest.

        1. Well then you’re a lousy libertarian.

          What’s the justification for taxing marijuana more heavily than any other consumer product? Alcohol and tobacco are taxed because their use produces externalities (some of which we willingly create by setting up a welfare state that pays for lung cancer treatments for tobacco users).

          But pot? Pot is much less harmful than alcohol or tobacco. So why are we taxing it heavily again? Because we want to discourage its use? Hey, if prohibition isn’t doing the trick, why would taxing it? And why do we want to discourage its use again?

          If we’re going to legalize weed, let’s win an argument about liberty in the process. These “legalize, regulate, and tax the hell out of it” arguments just fuel the thinking that the Government Knows Best.

          1. Look, I’d be much happier if the excise tax was .10/pound. I’d love to be able to ingest whatever I want to because no one else should have control over that.

            At the same time I’d rather have legal weed that costs $100/oz. including $10 in taxes than illegal weed that costs $400/oz. because of the black market.

            1. And that doesn’t even begin to address the little problem of going to jail and perhaps having all your shit jacked by the cops for a “job well done” in getting a “dangerous criminal” off the street.

              I’d rather pay a tax than go to fucking jail because a fucking SWAT team busted in my home at 6am.

              Baby steps towards regaining liberty is better than not ever fucking getting there so we can stick to philosophical purity.

          2. I hate to break this to you, because you do have many good points, but inhaling smoke is inhaling smoke is inhaling smoke. And no matter what you do, inhaling smoke will still fuck with your lungs. It doesn’t much matter what kind of smoke — it’s still not meant to be pulled into a human being’s lungs.

            Plus, the demonization of tobacco gets kind of old.

            1. Amount does matter. 85% of smoker smoke 6 or more cigarettes a day. It would take a dedicated stoner to keep up with that.

              And many smokers smoke much more than that. The commonly cited risk level for lumg cancer is a 20 pack-year history of smoking (1 pack [20 cigarettes] per day for 20 years). I once met a guy (at the VA hospital unsurprisingly) who had a 160 pack-year history–4 packs per day for 40 years.

        2. You all assume what the price of legalized marijuana would be in the first place. Last I looked, Phillip Morris CEO’s didn’t live in a 2 story farmhouse.

  13. But yeah, in general, cannabis cultivation is going to be a lot less lucrative, and you won’t see people making six figures by cropping out a 5×5 area in their basement several times per year.

    True, and perhaps that’s the real reason it remains illegal, or at least a big factor…

    1. You all assume what the price of legalized marijuana would be in the first place. Last I looked, Phillip Morris CEO’s didn’t live in a 2 story farmhouse.

  14. C’mon, we’re all out there, the 10% or better of us who are in their 40s and still smoke pot and have since they were teenagers.

    Give me break about the gateway drug nonsense. All the, largely professional folks I know that smoke, hold down jobs, raise kids, engage in community affairs, etc. Not one of them has gotten high and then thought gee, this ain’t for me. Got to go get me some crank.

    1. I agree, but for the record the guy talking about the gateway effect isn’t coming off like a drug warrior. Just discussing, not spreading nonsense.

  15. Why I Give My 9-Year-Old Pot, Part 3 — We hit a snag and made a big discovery about how medical marijuana works for him.

    Last summer, we reached the six-month mark in our cannabis experiment. We’d been using medical marijuana to help quell our autistic son’s gut pain and anxiety, and we were seeing some huge changes in his behavior and, presumably, his happiness. J was smiling, interacting (one of home-based therapists said she’d never encountered such an affectionate autistic child), even putting his dirty dishes in the dishwasher?rinsing and everything!?not only without being told, but without ever having been asked to do such a thing. The more I’d been reading, along with J’s doctor, about the effects of cannabis?analgesic, anti-anxiety, safe?the more it seemed a logical choice. I’ve also heard from other parents who’ve decided to try cannabis for their children. One of the kids has Smith-Magenis, a genetic disorder that includes autismlike behavioral symptoms including self-injury. Another is an autistic child who’d refused to eat and was near death. Post-marijuana, he is thriving. The Smith-Magenis boy, who’d been about to start court-ordered medication, is also doing well.

    http://www.slate.com/id/2251174/

    1. Aside from the legalization debate, for some individuals marijuana is a miracle medicine, and that is a fact. So Fuck You Schedule 1 Status, and the Federal Government propaganda machine.

      1. “Fuck You Schedule 1 Status”??

        No, Fuck You Entire Controlled Substances Act.

    2. Cool link, thanks.

      1. I plan to read the entire series. I know some autistic kids. With a bit of help, they can be really great.

    3. That fucking pediatrician should lose his license to practice medicine and be changing bedpans in a prison hospital.Don’t get me started on that hippie bitch, “my little Johnny’s autism only responds to “white russian” not the “kush”.”DFACS ought to be paying her a visit.

  16. Please stop yapping about taxing marijuana. I’m not going to pay a tax for the privilege of doing something that I already had the right to do anyway (government goon squads notwithstanding)
    Legalization is the right thing to do period. I’m a fully grown adult, it’s nobody’s business what I smoke, drink or eat.

    1. I pay tax on pesto. Why should weed be exempt?

      1. I know a dude in the mountains that makes bootleg pesto. Shit is awesome, except when it makes you go blind.

      2. You shouldn’t pay tax on pesto. It’s a basic foodstuff. If your state taxes it, your state is a dick.

        Anyway, marijuana should be taxed (or not taxed. Hi Delaware!) like any other consumer product unless the state can prove that it creates an externality peculiar to cannibis that justifies treating it like tobacco or beer instead of a slinky or a bra.

  17. Weed. Smoke it, and everyone’s cool. Talk about it, and tempers flare.

    http://28.media.tumblr.com/tum…..o1_500.jpg

  18. I pay tax on pesto. Why should weed be exempt?

    No kidding.

    The legalizationistas are their own worst enemy on this. The easiest way in the world to sell legalization is to say: Treat pot like alcohol. But to our “Don’t tax me, bro” compadres, that is unacceptable. They would rather have their dogs shot and go to jail than buy pot like they do beer. Its a mystery to me.

    1. I agree.

      The ideal situation would be to simply legalize it…period, but there is no way the state is going to pass up a new tax.

      With a reasonable tax, there is no reason I can see why pot should be unaffordable for anyone who wants to buy it. With an unreasonable tax, though, there will be the same incentive for a black market that exists today, with all (or most) of the attendant problems.

    2. “The easiest way in the world to sell legalization is to say: Treat pot like alcohol.”

      Disagree, because you’re being dishonest (nothing personal, man), and I’m not going to lie in service of my political ends.

      We should have an intelligent conversation about why we tax certain substances more than others. The stated reason is that certain products create externalities that we all pay for, so we should place those costs on the users through excise taxes. Before the state can tax one product more than another, we should require proof that these externalities actually exist.

      If we allow tobacco-level taxes on a much-less-dangerous product, we’re sending the message that the taxes don’t necessarily have any relationship with externalities… or maybe just that we’re dumb and anti-science. Either way, we’re conceding the position that the government should be able to be arbitrary with its taxation, picking tax winners and tax losers based on caprice. Do we really want that position to prevail?

      1. ummm it already prevails in our new Health care reform.

  19. All in moderation.
    I wish we could see some factual studies done on the impact of pot to the economy. I think that Robert E. Legal a few comments up made a very important comment in the way that functional pot smokers think “If I am doing it now, why would I pay to do it tomorrow”.

    I think the tax ramifications are far less than we would actually see. You could however crack down on taxing the farmers, which in turn would raise prices. However, they have been growing pot so long they likely have the same mindset. It’s not like Johnny from KY is going to be taking out a Short Term Loan to buy pot seeds.

    Weed has never been social accepted. Would you really be happy if your tax advisor was high all the time?

    1. He isn’t drunk all the time now, is he?

  20. Weed has never been social accepted. Would you really be happy if your tax advisor was high all the time?

    How do you leap from legalization of weed to anybody wanting their accountant to turn into a sot?

    Bourbon is legal, and I don’t want my accountant, or lawyer, or prostitute to be drunk all the time.

    1. I’m cool with the prostitute always being drunk. (not snark)

      1. Not me, I prefer clear-headed professionals.

  21. I do not consider it a leap – More of a moderation shift. I am ‘ok’ with it being legal, but I wanted to show my belief that it will have a stigma attached to pot smoking. More so than drinking does (imho).

    1. Employer drug testing will keep a heavy stigma on legal marijuana use.Those medical marijuana cards don’t get them out of it in Cali do they? Certainly not any USDOT mandated testing.

      1. Certainly along with legalization of Marijuana we need to offer a new method of short term use testing vs just “use”. Much like alcohol has a breathalyzer. While its legal to drink….drinking on the job will probably get you fired. Anyone out there have a “recently used” test method?

        1. What’s this “we” Kemosabe? If employers want to test employees for use in the past 2 or 6+ weeks that is their business.The legality of marijuana as property doesn’t give you a right to work for anyone who doesn’t want you using it.

  22. There will be little or NO enforcement savings. You are legalizing 1 drug, not all of them. The same law enforcement agencies will stay in place, weeding out the real killers, meth, crack, heroin…ect. I wish it were true, but it isn’t. As for revenue…once again, the revenue is already here, we just don’t SEE it. The “drug Lord’s” are not burying the money they make…it is circulating, albeit not all of it in America.
    I would like to point out however, that the tobacco industry didn’t need government loans or to lay off workers during this recession. I pay $6 for a pack of cigs that costs $75 or less to produce, at least $2 profit for manufacturer, and over $3 in taxes…and they are ADDICTIVE legal drugs, real KILLERS. I can’t quit smoking cigs but I can take or leave pot at a whim.
    I just hope the lawyers have better arguments, than “its going to happen any way” and “its our bodies.” You are talking to the same people who just initiated socialism Health care. I for one almost NEED to get stoned just to console myself from the ignorance and hypocrisy of the majority of Americans as well as the hypocrisy and deception of our government and their policies concerning drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

  23. Folks need to get over the absurd idea that legal pot would generate significant tax revenues. It’s been blatantly obvious for a few decades that this is an exceptionally easy crop to produce in your own home. People who would be helpless if told to produce a tobacco crop seem to have no problem producing loads of cannabis. The tobacco industry would be a tiny fraction of its size if that plant were so easy to cultivate.

    If you’re truly looking to legalize, how are you going to prevent home growers from producing their own tax free crop that fulfills all of their needs?

    1. Should we also say micro brewing your own beer ruins the beer industry? Wine cellars the wine industry? Moonshine the…
      Where are your facts? How many plants would a person need to grow for personal year round consumption? How much time would they have to invest? How much money? Do they have the space available?
      If you legalize marijuana would any significant amount of users suddenly turn into green thumb full time plant farmers? I know after a hard 9 hour day away from home, I have another full time job paying bills, cleaning dishes, laundry, cleaning my house, my car, my lawn…and I don’t even have kids at home…

      1. I have never grown any, and I don’t smoke it so this whole discussion is purely academic for me, but from what I read it sounds like one could produce about five pounds per year from a 25 square foot space. That seems like more than enough to supply a year’s worth of consumption, and it hardly sounds like a full-time job.

        1. You’re right. It’s all academic for you.

    2. “People who would be helpless if told to produce a tobacco crop seem to have no problem producing loads of cannabis.”

      Am I really supposed to take you seriously? I must of missed that Harvard study…

      1. You ever tried to grow tobacco ? It isn’t easy for a home gardener. Sometimes the professionals fuck it up too and get a reduced yield. Sure a skilled pot grower can produce a better product than your average home gardener.With good seed stock you can grow decent weed (outside) for pennies a gram. What’s that taxed, regulated, government ganja gonna sell for?

        1. Tobacco also needs a shitload of special handling and processing after picking that an amateur gardener would have a hard time coping with too.

  24. When they talk about taxing pot, that means you would pay the state sales tax 6 to 10 %. Same as milk, booze, bread, etc. They would also tax the growers, the same way they do cigs. or booze. Most people would not grow their own because they are too busy or lazy. None the less, the price would come way down to about the same as a pack of cigs. $5.00 At this point, people who want to get high will choose pot. This would reduce the demand for harder drugs. Gangs in this country and across the border would be out of business. Prohibition creates pirates and criminals. This is a real no brainer, but who says Americans have brains. They are greedy and will legalize to get into the game. Just a matter of time. If you really want to do something, check out http://www.unitedearthdemocracy.com
    db

  25. There will be little or NO enforcement savings.

    Wrong. There are many people in jail and prison who are currently serving sentences for possession.

    Also, you have police departments like NYC, where the cops have been telling people to turn out their pockets. Possession of marijuana isn’t a crime in NYC, but showing it in public is. So the people do as they are ordered, and then they are arrested for their “crime”.

    Other police departments (Such as Denver) also target marijuana users, even after the voters tell them that it should be the lowest priority.

    FWIW, Ohio probably has the best laws in the country regarding marijuana possession.

  26. For L. Ron Hubbard’s sake, if you are going to keep posting that video, at least change ‘er up a little – like start off by taking a bong hit, Nick! Surely Cavanaugh is a stoner. If your’re out there, Tim, I’d feel better about reading your posts if I thought you were high when you wrote them. I’m just sayin’.

  27. For everyone saying that most people would just grow their own, I’m wondering what kind of beer you drink. If you’re fine with Coors Light day in and day out (or anything else, really), then I guess your argument works – for you. For anyone who cares at all about variety, it’s a crap argument. I can brew my own beer relatively easily if I can actually find the time. But I can’t brew 100 different kinds of beer. The Beer Castle down the street, however, has at least that many kinds of beer for me to choose from. That’s why I patronize the Beer Castle, and many other beer merchants, even though I know how to brew my own. It’s called commerce, people!

  28. The “gateway” argument sounds to me like the “domino-effect” we heard to justify the Vietnam War. Both arguments are and were irrational and simply government propaganda to justify ridiculous policies. I don’t drink alcohol, tea, coffee, or use tobacco, and certainly don’t use other drugs (yep, I’m a Mormon), and I support the legalization of marijuana and the decriminalization of other drugs. Cogito ergo sum.

  29. “it’s not like people are getting hurt by unregulated marijuana” Masterbatin Pete comments…

    This is debatable especially when you begin to think about how organized crime has taken over the business of “unregulated” marijuana or how tenants use the premises they live in to grow it and leave a molding structure that requires significant repairs…and dollars. And as the article states, the amount of dollars taken out of the public purse to jail mainly pot users or low level dealers is harmful to other publicly financed sectors, like infrastructure, health care and education, items that provides benefits to us all and not costs.

    Tax revenue may not be a solid argument for legalization as it is not the hardest plant to grow and certain strains developed have made it easier to grow extremely potent plants.

    I guess the convenience of going into a liquor store or a drug store to purchase the behind the counter marijuana will be attractive to some, but to others, the “liberitarians”, they will have the option of growing their own.

    1. items that provides benefits to us all and not costs.

      Well, theres still a cost. But at least you get the benefit in exchange, instead of “the cost plus screwing over the populace and destroying the justice system”.

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