Politicians Smother Cities

How to bring life back to great American cities

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I like my hometown, but I must admit that New York has problems: high taxes, noise, traffic. Forbes magazine just ranked my city the 16th most miserable in America. Ouch! Of course, that makes me wonder: What's America's most miserable city?

Cleveland, says Forbes. People call it "the Mistake by the Lake. " Cleveland, once America's sixth-largest city, has been going downhill for decades.

Why do some cities thrive while others decay? One reason is that some politicians smother their cities with the unintended consequences of their grand visions, while others have the good sense to limit government power.

In a state that already taxes its citizens heavily, Cleveland's politicians drown businesses in taxes.

One result: Since 2000, 50,000 people have left the city. Half of Cleveland's population has left since 1950.

But the politicians haven't learned. They still think government is the key to revitalization. While Indianapolis privatized services, Cleveland prefers state capitalism. It owns and operates a big grocery store, the West Side Market. Typical of government, it's open only four days a week, and two of those days it closes at 4 p.m. The city doesn't maintain the market very well. Despite those cost savings, the city manages to lose money running the market. It also loses money running golf courses—$400,000 last year.

Another way that cities like Cleveland cause their own decline is through regulations that make building anything a long drawn-out affair. Cleveland has 22 different zoning designations and 673 pages of zoning guidelines.

By contrast, Houston has almost no zoning. This permits a mix of uses and styles that gives the city vitality. And the paperwork in Houston is so light that a business can get going in a single afternoon. In Cleveland, one politician bragged that he helped a business get though the red tape in "just 18 months."

Randall O'Toole, author of The Best-Laid Plans: How Government Planning Harms Your Quality of Life, Your Pocketbook, and Your Future, says Houston does have rules, but they are more flexible and responsive to citizens' needs because they are set by neighborhood associations based on protective covenants written by developers.

Politicians' rules rarely change because the politicians don't have their own money on the line. Cleveland's managers thought that funding gleaming new sports stadiums (which subsidize wealthy team owners) and other prestigious attractions like the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame would revitalize their city.

Urban policy expert Joel Kotkin says, "This whole tendency to put what are scarce public funds into conventions centers and … ephemeral projects is delusional."

But politicians claim that stadiums increase the number of jobs.

Not so, says J.C. Bradbury, author of The Baseball Economist: The Real Game Exposed. "There's a huge consensus among economists that there is no economic development benefit to having these stadiums," he says.

The stadiums do create jobs for construction workers and some vendors. But "it's a case of the seen and the unseen," Bradbury says, alluding to the 19th-century French economist Frederic Bastiat. "It's very easy to see a new stadium going up. … But what you don't see is that something else didn't get built across town. … It's just transferring from one place to the other.

"People don't bury their entertainment dollars in a coffee can in their backyard and then dig it up when a baseball team comes to town. They switch it from something else."

Stadiums are among the more foolish of politicians' boondoggles. There are only 81 home baseball games a year and 41 basketball games. How does that sustain a neighborhood economy?

But the arrogance of city planners knows no end. Now Cleveland is spending taxpayers' money on a medical convention center that they say will turn Cleveland into a "Disney World" for doctors. Well, Chicago's $1 billion expansion of the country's biggest convention center—McCormick Place—was unable to prevent an annual drop in conventions, and analysts say America already has 40 percent more convention space than it needs.

Politicians would be better stewards of their cities if they set simple rules and then just got out of the way. I won't hold my breath.

John Stossel is host of Stossel on the Fox Business Network. He's the author of Give Me a Break and of Myth, Lies, and Downright Stupidity. To find out more about John Stossel, visit his site at johnstossel.com.

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Bonus Reason.tv video: The Decline of a Once-Great-City: Reason Saves Cleveland With Drew Carey.

NEXT: Lip Gloss In, Corsets and Mangles Out: Inflation Update

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  1. Stossel does it again!

  2. Stossel for President

  3. Stossel, I want to blow you.

    1. Stossel, I can’t think of an intelligent reply to your article so I will descend into profanity. Has worked like a charm since second grade.

      1. Supermarket, farmer’s market, whatever. As long as a government is demonized, it’s true. That’s what passes for “journalism” in glibertarian circles. download going the distance | download never let me go

    2. Queers for Stossel.

  4. The West Side Market is not a “grocery store” (in the sense that a Safeway is a grocery store), but instead is an indoors farmer’s market (the city leases the building to several dozen tenants). The city was also originally gifted the land with a stipulation that such a farmer’s market be held on the site. Sloppy reporting that a ten second Google search could clarify.

    http://www.westsidemarket.org/about.html

    1. So if I give Clevelan a few acres on the stipulation that they hold a midget porn festivals and shoe shine exhibitions weekly, Cleveland wouldn’t be wasting money by accepting the land and following my wishes?

      They are still losing money on land off the tax rolls!

      1. Did someone say “midget porn and shoeshine exhibitions”! I’m in!

      2. PS RACIST!

    2. The city was “gifted” land that enabled them to make a consistent, significan annual loss. Sounds like a great idea. Thanks for the clarification.

      1. It’s not a great idea, of course. However, the reporting sounds like the city operates a supermarket, which is completely false. It is merely a landlord. Now, it looks like they should raise the rents, especially since there doesn’t seem to be a shortage of tenants. Stossel could have easily went with that angle. (The city can’t make money on a full farmer’s market building because it won’t raise rents due to political pressure or whatever reason.) But he choose to either be lazy or intentionally spun it in a false direction.

        1. Supermarket, farmer’s market, whatever. As long as a government is demonized, it’s true. That’s what passes for “journalism” in glibertarian circles.

          1. Stossel might have been lazy with his article (I don’t think a lifetime New Yorker can even conceptualize a “Farmer’s Market”) but that does not change the fact that those morons lose money. Hmmm, maybe they should let the dump stay open longer, hike the rent to an appropriate level, and let the fiscal problems level out. Oh, we can’t do that because making a “profit” is a sin, “hurting” the little guy is immoral, and requiring overweight bureaucrat “landlords” to work longer hours for the same pay is the worst thing in the goddamned world. Of course, a private individual who is willing to work hard would have little qualms making these tough decisions if it meant keeping his business in the black. Cleveland Bureaucrats are subsidized failures, living in a city of subsidized failure that is justifiably losing to more competitive, less oppressive cities. Now, do you have a rational defense for this crap? Why the fuck do they operate have two goddamn golf courses? Golf? The evil sport of the fat, selfish, and wealthy? Why would a government with its priorities straight be involved in that business?
            Moreover, Reason’s Cleveland video seemed to characterize this white elephant pretty well even if Stossel was dozing at his wheel. I like Stossel, but he tends to gloss over things when preaching to the choir.

          2. Beats glorifying government, Orel.

          3. Why is it wrong to demonize government when it’s called for?

          4. Supermarket… Farmersmarket… Stossel is really not off the truth at all. Who cares what the fuck you call it. Government shouldn’t be operating a market, it shouldn’t be a landlord, and it shouldn’t be interfering with the market to determine the “correct” food proprietor to open in the city (see Burlington, VT).

            I don’t give a shit that the land was a gift, the city government should have rejected having anything to do with this bullshit.

  5. “People don’t bury their entertainment dollars in a coffee can in their backyard and then dig it up when a baseball team comes to town. They switch it from something else.”

    and

    Politicians would be better stewards of their cities if they set simple rules and then just got out of the way.

    Both QFMFT.

    1. I absolutely agree with these two. Zoning and permits should be simple as possible. Personally, I think both such be limited to restricting things for safety reasons. Zillion dollar ball parks should be built using private money.

      1. Actually, I cant agree with minimal zoning. An example would be downstate New Hampshire.

        Driving along those unzoned roads is like driving through a junk yard. Live Free or Die is a great slogan, but it makes the State look like a shit hole.

        1. Yeah. Detroit, with it’s extensive zoning regulations and decades of urban planning excellence is a much nicer drive.

          1. Well, maybe the answer is somewhere in the middle. Minimal zoning by the locals only.
            Right next door to NH is beautiful Vermont. Maybe we should follow their lead.

            1. Well, as long as you are the arbiter of what is “beautiful”. I’m sure the NH property owners give a crap.

            2. Who gives a shit if part of NH looks like a “shit hole”. Maryland, Viriginia, and D.C. look like shit holes as well despite all the zoning regulations, high taxes, and the ass load of government money extruded onto the metro area. NH probably looks like a shit hole, because people couldn’t care less. Sometimes things looking “nice” are not the priority of people who have shit to do. Sometimes they are. If Vermont is so nice, just move there. Its a less ridiculous proposition then asking you to move to Cananda or France for their so-called health care.

            3. What the fuck do you care if someone else’s property looks like shit? You know, zoning laws to make everything uniform and pretty often result in fake, sprawling, shitty areas too. Fuck property values.

            4. You think Vermont is a good role model to follow? They might as well join Canada, the fucking socialist bastards.

  6. No. 5 Flint, Mich.

    The city of Flint is buying up houses and demolishing them in an effort to shrink the size of the city to a sustainable level. The area received $25 million in stimulus funds from the federal government to help with the plan.

    I think I found the problem

    1. It seems to me that a place like Flint has one thing to offer; cheap land, housing and cost of living. Instead of bulldozing these houses, maybe they should be trying to get them and the neighborhoods they are in back to a livable condition. If you destroy your own housing stock, you will just raise the price of housing and make your city even less attractive.

      Of course making those neighborhoods livable again would require spending money on something besides SEIU give aways and pensions. And no one wants that.

      1. But that is what they want. They want house prices to be high, so whatever developer that sucked off the mayor can move in, jack the prices up, and make a killing. Jokes on him though, no new jobs = no new homebuyers. Sucker.

  7. #7 St Louis
    W00t

  8. I hope reason publishes another article like this. Six articles about Cleveland in 2 days is far too few.

    1. Yes, everything you never wanted to know about Cleveland.

      Reason must be starved for celebrity gravitas to support this over coverage of an ugly city.

      1. Cle is like a horse led to water that won’t drink. In fact, you could hold the horse’s head down in the trough and it might only suck in to drown, in steadfast refusal to drink… unless a beloved hometown celeb helps make the case.

        I think it’s brilliant. Cle is like so many other cities, that need to be shown in this kind of light. The more detail, the better exposed. I lived there from ’68-2002, so I have a good idea how on the mark this article and the reason.tv series is.

  9. The lack of urban planning ruins cities.

    1. Whose plan? There is always planning, a city is ruined when a single planning body is given control over other people’s decisions. A vibrant city is made up of hundreds of thousands of little plans, not one big one.

    2. It’s apparently killing Houston – they just don’t know it yet

      1. The typical (bad) argument against this is that Houston really sucks because (it’s ugly, it should have been laid out this way, it allows someone to do things we don’t like.) This ignores that a city exists for the utility of its people, not to satisfy the aesthetic standards of coffee shop philosophers.

        1. Aesthetic standards of coffee shop philosophers who have some bullshit ideal from 1940s Greenwich village that never existed. The concept that some people actually like places like Houston or like living in a suburb with their own yard and house is completely foreign to them.

      2. I grew up in Houston, and the no-zoning thing wasn’t too bad. They do have *some* rules (i.e. no strip clubs within X number of yards of a school, church or playground), and everything works most of the time.

        The only big complaint I ever heard re Houston’s no-zoning was when they built a 10-story office building that allowed some people on the upper floors to see over the backyard fences of a neighborhood. Evidently, one of my mom’s friends (or maybe a friend of a friend) was stressed out by this, because she felt that she was unable to continue to enjoy nude sunbathing in her backyard because of this building. (I had to wash my eyes out for a bit thinking of someone that age being naked in public, but after that, I laughed.)

    3. Define ruin. Any examples?

      1. He means ruins cities’ poverty.

    4. Joe,

      I guess you also think that cities like London, Paris, Rome and Berlin are also “ugly” because they did not have zoning until the Marxist “1968’ers” took over. When they did they have made those cities increasingly unlivable except for the very wealthy, members of government, academia (who are little more then glorified welfare queens) and the illegal immigrants and their pet “poor” people who the others keep in glorified slums so they can feel better about themselves. Whatever “beauty” those cities have was created centuries ago under the rule of kings and emperors. Trust me as one who lived in London for some time London is quite ugly and dirty outside of the touristy bits and the enclaves of the rich and well connected.

      In this country 50 years of Democrat/liberal rule of some cites and states has done the same thing. Detroit is a rotting corpse. Chicago is comatose and on Obmamaslushfund life support. San Francisco is a zombie collapsing under the weight of the parasites it gladly hosts. L.A., NYC, Boston have become economic and social hellholes to all except the mega wealthy. Minneapolis and Seattle are dying-they are being suffocated by the same smug, overzealous, “holier then thou” liberal zoning laws and “sustainability” BS that has killed San Francisco and L.A..

  10. “Stadiums are among the more foolish of politicians’ boondoggles”.

    I can say this is totally false. Stadiums are excellent things for politicians to build. It gets them re-elected. Rabid sports fans don’t pay attention to the news or care how it is going to be paid for, just that their beloved team gets a stadium.

    For that same reason due-process does not apply to people accused to being pedophiles.

    1. And building the stadium gets you free admittance into the owners box. What is not to love?

    2. Seattle told the Sonics to pack sand and the Sonics left. This has impacted livability in Seattle not one goddan bit.

      Take note taxpayers, you are being played for suckers by billionaire owners and their millionaire employees while you can’t afford to take the family to a game without taking out a loan.

      1. The NFL hasn’t been in LA for over a decade. And no one notices.

        1. St. Louis and Oakland noticed.

          DAMN YOU KIRK!!!!

          1. I guess I missed the millions migrating from L.A. to Oakland to escape the lack of an NFL team.

            1. No, but you didn’t qualify you comment to be relative only to LA residents. The tax payers of Oakland and St Louis got uber screwed cause LA sucks…kind of a shit rolls downhill thing.

              OOOOOOklahoma,where the wind …

              1. Just because LA was smart enough to tell the NFL to go fuck themselves and Oakland and St. Louis were not, is not LA’s fault.

        2. The NFL hasn’t been in Detroit for over 50 years, and no on notices

          1. +infinity

          2. I do!

      2. Well, we really tried to get rid of the Seahawks back in the 90’s…

      3. Hell, the Cowboys haven’t been in Dallas for decades.

        Although they are close by.

        The only thing Mayor Laura Miller ever did that didn’t suck donkey nuts was tell Jerry Jones he was going to have to pony up if he wanted a stadium that was actually in Dallas.

        1. Considering the Cowboys record of criminality associated with the Cowboys, (Bob Hayes, Nate Newton, Lance Rentzel, Thomas Henderson, Eric Williams, Micheal Irvin to name worst of the hoodlums), she probably didn’t have the police budget to take them back.

        2. That, and argue with the guy who claimed to be Shaman of the Ibo tribe. Dallas City Council meetings were the best thing about radio in DFW.

    3. Forcing taxpayers to help pay for sports stadiums is maybe the dumbest thing I’ve ever heard. Why should I help you filthy rich people pay for your stadiums? Those same rich people don’t help me pay for any of my assets.

  11. Jim Irsay threatened to pack up the Dolts and move to L A.

    Unfortunately, instead of offering to help him load the trucks, the Hoosier Clems built him a new stadium.

    Fuck you, Indiana.

    1. Actually, more flexible zoning in urban areas would reduce sprawl naturally. If one could build an apartment building near the central job area of a city to be as tall as one liked with no political interference/payoffs, more people would be able to afford to live closer to work, which would reduce traffic/pollution/the bulldozing of land that is home to cute fluffy animals. Now, not everybody would want to do so (families with children usually want a backyard), but those that would be willing to would be able to afford to, because supplies going up with stable demand means prices go down.

      1. I wonder how many people who complain about people not using public transportation enough also complain about the population densities of places like New York City, Boston, and San Francisco?

  12. Houston thrives while Cleveland dies.

    1. It’s too bad that Houston thrives whil Clevelan isn’t. We should work it out so that everyone would succeed. electric griddle | george foreman grill

    2. It’s too bad that Houston thrives whil Clevelan isn’t. We should work it out so that everyone would succeed. electric griddle

      1. but unfortunately,it ain’t easy you know.of course,we all can join our hands and strive hard but realistically speaking,it will be hardest of times.nevertheless,with enough efforts,we can succeed no matter what
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  13. The keystones of the modern American economy, the T-shirt and the hot dog industry, will suffer.

  14. Great show. The Q&A with the audience at the end was cool. I just did a conference in Houston. The same conference was in Cleveland six years ago. Your characterization of both cities is spot on. Houston is alive, thriving, amazing, and beautiful. Cleveland is a dump.

  15. Hey John: If you are going to make the claim that the overwhelming majority of economists believe something, you might want to cite some real research by real economists, rather than quote a random tangentially-related book.

    It’s odd that you admit that professional sports draw tens of thousands of people to downtown Cleveland more than two days per week on average, yet somehow claim that this doesn’t affect business there. Sure, people will spend their “entertainment dollars” on something else if there were no pro sports, but I can damned well assure you that few of these dollars would be spent in downtown Cleveland.

    1. cost-benefit analysis.
      learn it.

    2. Wow! Chad’s championing commerce! I’m amazed.

  16. What about Boulder, Berkley, San Francisco and NYC? Plenty of regulations and plenty popular.

    Stossel again shows that he is an intellectual lightweight. He starts with his premise (here, regulations drive people out of cities) and then collects only facts that support his position. Weak stuff.

    1. Just about 1/2 of the NYC population is immigrant or first generation descendent of immigrant. If not for that, its population could be about 4 million – 1/2 its 1970 population.

      People born in NYC move out. People from the great shitholes of the world move there because NY is less of a shithole than where they were living.

      1. Obviously, NYC has something that attracts immigrants. Nothing new there. And they’re a large part of what attracts some of us “natives” to live here too. Whether they were born here, come from another part of America, or from around the world, seems immaterial to me.

    2. “Nearly half the families in San Francisco with preschool children stated in a newly released survey their intent to move out of the city in the next three years, citing the lack of affordable housing, concern over public safety and the state of the public schools as their primary motivators….people under the age of 18 make up 15 percent of San Francisco’s population of nearly 700,000 — the lowest per-capita population of children among major cities in the United States.” (SFGate, 2005)

      “More than 30 percent of New York City women over 40 have only one child, and over 30 percent of all families are single-child families…Astronomical expenses…make New York City the national capital of only children.” (NY Mag, 2005)

      “Berkeley High was identified as the high school with the largest racial equity/achievement gap in the state.” (Berkeley Daily Planet 2009)

      “The population density is 1,499.9/km? (3,884.1/sq mi), making Boulder’s population density higher than Denver’s and among the highest in the state…Boulder housing tends to be priced higher than surrounding areas…Boulder maintains the highest city tax and the most expensive housing market in Colorado.” (Various)

      Good choices, bubba!

      1. Here’s maybe one reason why parents with kids don’t think SF is the greatest place to raise kids.

        Feast your eyes on an officially sanctioned street fair:
        http://www.folsomstreetfair.co…..lsom-2009/

        1. Ain’t variety great? Parents who see no need to pretend gays don’t exist can choose to live in SF where such silliness might occasionally be on display. Parents who do can decamp to Concord.

      2. And yet these lower-than-average-number-of-children folks STILL choose to live in these places. What is WRONG with them??

        Your point is obvious. Most families with kids choose the bigger yard and the longer commute. That doesn’t change the fact that urban areas continue to draw singles and immigrants, among others. This series isn’t about how to bring more families to (relatively) successful cities like NY or SF. It’s about how to revive DEAD cities, where even singles don’t want to live anymore.

        1. Rhywun hit the nail on the head with “It’s about how to revive DEAD cities, where even singles don’t want to live anymore.”.

          In order to do that they have to have jobs. Decades of Democrat rule and their liberal “social engineering experimentation” has killed off job creation in those cities and the states they are located in. Businesses and the single people and families they employ (or might employ) are voting with their feet (and U-Haul trucks) and leaving in droves. The ones who can not afford to move are stuck living off the dole because there are no jobs to be found even if they want to work.

  17. It is about to get worse for Cleveland. I do consultant work for a company that has over 100 employees and they are pulling out this summer, got to Franklin TN – they have not told them yet . The reason is all the red tape, that they will not deal with any longer.

  18. Here’s maybe one reason why parents with kids don’t think SF is the greatest place to raise kids.
    http://www.christianlouboutinvips.com
    http://www.christianlouboutinvips.com

  19. taylor sucks things, and knows how to get it hard!!!!! every night with girls and guys.

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  21. My only point is that if you take the Bible straight, as I’m sure many of Reasons readers do, you will see a lot of the Old Testament stuff as absolutely insane. Even some cursory knowledge of Hebrew and doing some mathematics and logic will tell you that you really won’t get the full deal by just doing regular skill english reading for those books. In other words, there’s more to the books of the Bible than most will ever grasp. I’m not concerned that Mr. Crumb will go to hell or anything crazy like that! It’s just that he, like many types of religionists, seems to take it literally, take it straight…the Bible’s books were not written by straight laced divinity students in 3 piece suits who white wash religious beliefs as if God made them with clothes on…the Bible’s books were written by people with very different mindsets…in order to really get the Books of the Bible, you have to cultivate such a mindset, it’s literally a labyrinth, that’s no joke.

  22. My only point is that if you take the Bible straight, as I’m sure many of Reasons readers do, you will see a lot of the Old Testament stuff as absolutely insane. Even some cursory knowledge of Hebrew and doing some mathematics and logic will tell you that you really won’t get the full deal by just doing regular skill english reading for those books. In other words, there’s more to the books of the Bible than most will ever grasp. I’m not concerned that Mr. Crumb will go to hell or anything crazy like that! It’s just that he, like many types of religionists, seems to take it literally, take it straight…the Bible’s books were not written by straight laced divinity students in 3 piece suits who white wash religious beliefs as if God made them with clothes on…the Bible’s books were written by people with very different mindsets…in order to really get the Books of the Bible, you have to cultivate such a mindset, it’s literally a labyrinth, that’s no joke.

  23. My only point is that if you take the Bible straight, as I’m sure many of Reasons readers do, you will see a lot of the Old Testament stuff as absolutely insane. Even some cursory knowledge of Hebrew and doing some mathematics and logic will tell you that you really won’t get the full deal by just doing regular skill english reading for those books. In other words, there’s more to the books of the Bible than most will ever grasp. I’m not concerned that Mr. Crumb will go to hell or anything crazy like that! It’s just that he, like many types of religionists, seems to take it literally, take it straight…the Bible’s books were not written by straight laced divinity students in 3 piece suits who white wash religious beliefs as if God made them with clothes on…the Bible’s books were written by people with very different mindsets…in order to really get the Books of the Bible, you have to cultivate such a mindset, it’s literally a labyrinth, that’s no joke.

  24. “the mistake by the lake” lol, that made me laugh.

  25. that’s harsh, bro. CLE can’t be all that bad. Actually now that LJ left it probably is.

  26. Ugg boots (sometimes called uggs or ug boots) have been considered a fashion trend since the early 2000s.The combination of its soft shank and sheepskin interior means that ugg boots are designed for casual, short-term use, and not for situations which require sturdy, protective footwear, as the design emphasis is on style and comfort rather than protecting the feet. While in the boot, the sockless foot is in full contact with the sheepskin lining, thereby maximizing the insulative properties of the boot.

  27. Cleveland, says Forbes. People call it “the Mistake by the Lake. ” Cleveland, once America’s sixth-largest city, has been going downhill for decades.

  28. but unfortunately,it ain’t easy you know.of course,we all can join our hands and strive hard but realistically speaking,it will be hardest of times.nevertheless,with enough efforts,we can succeed no matter what
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  29. I lived in NYC for three years and wasn’t able to save a dime. It’s the most expensive city to live, but also the most exciting if you admire the fast paced lifestyle.

  30. I agree with your post. I lived in NYC for three years and wasn’t able to save a dime. It’s considered one of the most expensive cities to live in the USA, but also the most exciting if you admire the fast paced lifestyle.

  31. Politicians never learn. They decide to raise taxes, cut store hours, and give golf courses hundreds of thousands of dollars. The golden rule of being a politician is to think of only yourself, and ruin whatever you have control of. If you can follow these basic steps. You’re a shoe in. Don’t look back, or think of anyone but yourself.

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  37. Move to any city in Michigan and tell me if your happy. Its a beautiful stay with tons of parks with swing sets, baseball diamonds and fun things to do but there are zero jobs.

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