It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad Cow

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Well, now we get to see if the American public can go absolutely hysterical like their European cousins. Me, I'm glad I waited to get that Christmas rib roast. Should be half-off by now.

NEXT: Health of the State

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  1. Ingrid Newkirk, PETA activist, has not disavowed smuggling mad cow disease
    into the United States to promote the theory that eating any food material
    related to animals is strictly immoral, inhumane and, simply “yucky.”

  2. I was wondering the same thing, Ruthless. After the recent fire-bombings and other hyjinx of the lunatic animal rights herd, it wouldn’t shock me in the least to hear that they had deliberately infected a cow here to start an epidemic.

  3. Hm. Wonder what this’ll do for the Atkins revolution…

  4. ” it wouldn’t shock me in the least to hear that they had deliberately infected a cow here to start an epidemic.”

    That would require harming animals, which is probably out of the question.

  5. Its bad enough that beef tenderloin is already $17.99 a pound. What now?

  6. I suspect the price on that beef tenderloin will plummet post haste.

  7. So, who wants some Alberta beef now? Wonder if we’ll see the same treatment applied to U.S. beef supplies as was applied to Canadian beef earlier this year? Somehow I doubt it.

  8. Don’t you just have to get cow that’s fed a vegetarian diet? I noticed the free range stuff I usually buy started saying that all their cows were on a strictly vegetarian diet (like cows should be). . . pretty spiffy marketing angle now.

    Of course, I guess you have to trust that they aren’t lying to you.

    It’s that factory farm garbage you have to be worried about.

  9. Jon H,

    PETA has no problem hurting animals when they deem it necessary. They’ve been known to slaughter animals that they have “liberated” from labs. They claim this quick death is better than suffering in the lab or dying out in the elements. While the usual mode of killing is throat slicing or neck breaking, they have on occasion used bonfires. Yes, they still hold themselves superior.

  10. Prediction: Beef prices will fall slightly for a temporary time and will continue to rise after the New Year…the test for Mad Cow is not 100% accurate…when we tested deer for Chronic Wasting Disease (deer version of Mad Cow), we were told that the test is prone to false positives and negatives and that people are statistically extremely more likely to die from undercooking meat than coming down with CJS…and they think that CJS has been around since the beginning of time as it has only recently been recognized as a disease

  11. Leaving work early tonight, so I thought I’d take the time to wish each and every one of the posters to H&R a healthy, happy, and above all merry Christmas. Joyeux Noel to the merovingian, even. Take care all. Out

  12. CJS is caused by prions…little bits of floating DNA that exists in every piece of soil in the world…many people who have died of CJS in the US died from eating the brains of squirrels, deer, raccoons and other free-range type of animal (most of these animals were taken during hunting seasons)…truth is, CJS is caused by these prions, and these prions manifest themselves mainly in nerve tissue and brain tissue, don’t know why, but that is where they are found and nothing short of 800 degree Fahrenheit heat will kill it, that is if it is alive…

    It is unfortunate that this discussion has degraded into a shouting match over how to raise farm animals. mas is right about cattle, the only problem with his argument is that when cattle are taken to feed lots they are literally ass to hoof, but that doesn’t negate any of his arguments as these cattle are only in feed lots for a month or so at the most and spend 99% of their lives roaming acres of farm land grazing on grasses or feeding on hay or feed. Which leads me to my other point…

    I lived in the UK during the Mad Cow outbreak and it is my opinion that the practice of feeding bonemeal came about because of the Common Agriculture Plan that subsidized grains and oats which artificially drove prices up for grains and oats and farmers there had to supplement feed with bonemeal so that they could maximize the weight of their cattle and make more money…

    Here in the US, the practice of using bonemeal was not widespread, and in fact, the use of bonemeal in cattle feed is virtually unheard of even pre-1997 ban. Our grains, corn, and oats are not subsidized (honey, sugar beets, milk, cheese, etc., are) and the prices for these resources are consistantly going down in constant real dollars.

    Joe, the factory farm problem you speak of is generally hog farming. Hogs are omnivores and can eat bonemeal, as they sometimes eat their own children…hogs can and will eat anything. But to say that feeding bonemeal to hogs will be unhealthy for them goes against millions of years of evolution, and is plain stupid. Saying that raising hogs in factory farms is unhealthy is plain ignorant as hogs root in their own shit and eat it too…anything that eats its own shit is happy anywhere.

  13. I spent a good deal of time in England a few years ago. A while back I went in to donate blood and they refused me. It seems if you spent more than six months in the UK in the last 10 years they don’t want your blood. England imports all its blood from the US now.

    I talked to one of the vampires at the Red Cross when they turned me down. It seems the prion is actually an enzyme, really hard to detect and can take years to reveal itself as mad cow disease. Those guys were scared stiff of it.

    The point is that one confirmed case may represent thousands of ticking bombs out there.

    Prepare to listen to calm assurances from the food industry while they scramble like crazy in the background.

  14. Matt: Besides eating wildlife, there is a correlation between eating lamb/mutton and regular CJS (not the Mad Cow variant.)

  15. You must have gone mad.

  16. Firstly, I’ve been an on-and-off no beef, chicken, or pork eater for over 12 years now, mainly because I don’t think it’s really necessary to eat animals to survive in this day and age. But they sure are tasty, so that’s why the ‘off’ part.

    Anyway, Gadfly’s point that there may be a lot of ticking time bombs out there is a good one. My understanding is that the symptoms of ‘Mad Cow’ Disease are very similar to Alzheimer’s, and they don’t test to see if people were killed by it generally, since it is so hard to detect (correct me if I’m wrong here). Plus, the incubation period is a concern since it can be years.

    Generally, though, I’m not one to get hysterical so I’m not saying it’s something to really worry about at this stage, but it is scary that these things are out there.

  17. I know you folks got the reason, so you won’t be goofy … but, tell yer buddies: 120 people in Europe *maybe* died from the Mad Steak in all these years of hysteria. Europe’s population is not so far off from the USA’s population of 300 million.

    So, eat a nice steak for the holidays. If you’re going to die, chances are it will be in your bathtub or in your car.

  18. I assume everybody with a mad cow can trade with everybody else with a mad cow.

    Importing a mad cow doesn’t cause an epidemic unless you feed the mad cow to cows. Stop doing that, or don’t do that, and it dies out.

    Radio Japan interview with their mad cow expert after their own first mad cow was discovered (2001) http://rhhardin1.home.mindspring.com/japancut.cow2.ra (823kb) if you are entertained by accents.

  19. Having lived in the UK during the Mad Cow scare, I too am unable to donate blood. The US outbreak begs the question: When will the Red Cross begin preventing beef eaters from donating?

  20. OL,
    As a regular donator of blood products–no, not plasma–we can look on the bright side and hope this will open up a free market in body parts.
    Republicans, neocons and capitalists seem to have little faith in the market when it comes to body parts and apheresis.
    Why is that?
    What’s for dinner? Ingrid.

  21. You guys are looking at PETA people, but we all know that lefty causes can’t be to blame when there is a perfectly acceptable Evil Corporate Entity.

    Big Bread is behind all this. Too much market share lost to Atkins.

  22. Richard,
    You are likely aware adult elephant shit is the “formula” for baby elephants.
    I saw it on PBS.

    As the Colonel says, “finger-lickin'” and/or truck-lickin’.

    Ever ate an elephant? Maybe you will be if Mad Cow can’t jump to pachyderms.

    My pygmy friends tell me they are so succulent.

  23. Factory farms aren’t healthy. There are going to be consequences. Duh.

  24. Dang, Jason; stole my theory. So, what are the most reasonable explanations for the appearance of mad cow disease?

    1. Cannibal cows
    2. PETA
    3. Pillsbury
    4. Colonel Sanders

    Or, maybe all acting independently. Kinda like how the Cubans, CIA, Russians, and Lee Harvey Oswald all took shots at Kennedy completely unaware of each other.

    5. al Queda — read Stephen Bury’s (Neal Stephenson) Cobweb. Just before the Gulf War, Iraqi scientists infiltrate midwestern ag colleges to develop biological weapons.

  25. while peta are indeed a bunch of jackasses – though i always liked that animals for the ethical treatment of scientists t-shirt they put out in the early 90s – there are a lot more unethical, stupid, poorly-managed businesses than there are unethical, stupid and poorly-managed animal rights groups.

    we all knew this would happen eventually, right?

  26. joe, that statement is simplistic and ridiculous on so many levels that i’m not sure where to start attacking.

    do you really think food was safer coming off mom & pop farms in 1903? that fewer per capita died of food poisoning then? or do you simply imagine that we should starve millions in order to grow only resource-intensive organic foods that have little or no proven advantages (but plenty of religious ones)? perhaps you’d like us to go back to an utopian agrarian society of some kind? or you’ve some other fantastic alternative, i’m sure? i’d like to hear about it.

    observe the reality, then talk — instead of blindly selling out to lefty religion. comments like these are so incredulously stupid as to call into question everything else you say.

    and yes, “stupid”. i strongly dislike referring to the arguments of those i disagree with as dumb — usually, they are not, but simply characterized of another viewpoint — but there’s no other way to address your statement. i can’t say i’ve ever seen anything as just plain dumb ever said here. i’m really amazed.

  27. Ken Layne writes: “So, eat a nice steak for the holidays. If you’re going to die, chances are it will be in your bathtub or in your car.”

    Maybe so, but the manner of death seems to count for more with people than the likelihood of death.

    Having your brain slowly turned into Brillo is definitely one of the nastier ways to go.

  28. and, more to the point: first, let’s be sure it isn’t a false positive. one case would be unusual. if there’s one, there should be several more.

    if/when we find out it is mad cow, find out who is breaking the rules, under what circumstances and hammer them. there can be no excuse for including nerve tissue mass in cattle feed. make an example of them.

  29. Mad Cow Disease isn’t sexually transmitted, is it?

  30. Just for the record–we’re still having a standing rib roast for Christmas dinner. Tasty.

  31. “there can be no excuse for including nerve tissue mass in cattle feed. make an example of them.”
    mak nas, do you agree fowl/beef-play would be much less likely if it were not for the existence of the Agriculture Dept?

  32. Joe’s not being simplistic. He’s being to the point. Factory farming is not healthy. In terms of BSE risk, yes, beef is less safe than it was in 1903, for reasons directly attributable to the “advances” of the last century. Two in particular:

    – The widespread use of sheep and cow bonemeal in cattle feed. This was curtailed a few years ago, only after BSE and Creutzfeld-Jakob were confirmed to be the same phenomenon.

    – Wider distribution of each animal. The widespread — and ongoing — practice of making ground beef from the combined parts of many animals increases the number of people potentially exposed to prion disease from a single animal. The practice of combining bonemeal from multiple animals in large batches of feed magnified this problem and furthered the reach of BSE/scrapie in animal populations. In 1903, the meat from one cow would have been consumed by patrons of one or two butcher shops over the course of a day. Now, with wholesale meat going to larger stores and being carved up in larger daily batches — and from smaller portions than an entire side of beef at a time — far more people are getting meat from the same cow. Simply buying organic or free-range isn’t going to decrease risk on this count. To minimize both risk factors, you’d have to be sure you’re getting meat ground from a single animal.

    In terms of prion disease risk, yes, the meat supply is more dangerous now than it was 100 years ago. Other health risks like bacteria might be lower now thanks to irradiation and more reliable refrigeration throughout the processing and distribution chain, but in 1903 you also didn’t have antibiotics in feed enabling a rise in multiple-resistant bacteria. And while I’ve seen electric and gas-powered refrigeration systems fail, I can’t say I’ve ever heard of a block of ice shorting out.

  33. I’m having lamb for Christmas.
    Nothing baaaaad about that.
    Cheers!

  34. In terms of BSE risk, yes, beef is less safe than it was in 1903

    even if i concede that, this is plainly not the same as saying that mass food production is not healthy — which is, to directly contradict you, WHOLLY simplistic. “not healthy” compared to what? it’s not even an argument — it’s a statement of faith.

    antibiotics in feed enabling a rise in multiple-resistant bacteria.

    i tend to agree with you here — overuse of antibiotics is a questionable idea, considering the mechanism. but, again, how does that make mass food production unhealthy, and unhealthy compared to what?

    at the end of the day, we feed more people than ever, using fewer resources per capita than ever, and fewer people (as a percentage) starve or die of food-related concerns than at any point in 500 million years of humanoid history. unhealthy?

  35. And while I’ve seen electric and gas-powered refrigeration systems fail, I can’t say I’ve ever heard of a block of ice shorting out.

    thank you for making so clear the fundamentalist absurdity of what i’m arguing against.

  36. “i tend to agree with you here — overuse of antibiotics is a questionable idea, considering the mechanism. but, again, how does that make mass food production unhealthy, and unhealthy compared to what?”

    OK, antibiotics. The way meat is raised in “mass production” facilities is so unhealthy for the animals involved that they need to be kept on a constant regimen of antibiotics, or they will as a certainty end up dead or sickly and scrawny. It is the practices employed that makes the constant dosing necessary. Compare this to animals raised in a more ethical manner, in which their “lifestyle” is inherently compatible with their physiology – wandering around in sufficient space, eating a diet which is appropriate for their digestive systems, not spending their days up to their knees in shit. These animals do not receive constant doses of antibiotics, because they do not require them.

    Your assertion that the only option other than Perdue-style hellholes is pre-industrial technology is proof positive that you don’t know what the hell you’re talking about. Organic farming is not a recreation of 1770s farming practices, but is in fact more informed by contemporary understandings of biology than the factory farm model. Factory farms are 1920s Henry Ford technology. It’s the 21st century for Chrissakes. Stop worshipping at the alter of capital intensive assembly lines.

  37. Let’s see……Al Quada(sp) training camps have been found in Washington State……Terrorist warning level has been increased because of increased chatter…..a cow is discovered to have Mad Cow in up-state Washinton

  38. I don’t think a disease that takes decades to manifest itself makes a very good terror weapon.

  39. proof positive that you don’t know what the hell you’re talking about.

    in fact, i do know a bit about this — probably more than anyone here, as i spend time on large farms (yep, real live farms) on a monthly basis, and am intimately familiar with what we’re discussing. and this:

    The way meat is raised in “mass production” facilities is so unhealthy for the animals involved that they need to be kept on a constant regimen of antibiotics, or they will as a certainty end up dead or sickly and scrawny.

    … is something you’ve read out of slanted literature, my dear, because it ain’t true. i’ve seen the cattle (yep, the real cattle). the kafkaesque animal-dungeon does not exist for cattle, that i’ve seen, except in green literature (though chickens may be a different matter). and this:

    Organic farming is not a recreation of 1770s farming practices,

    … is wholly true, but also has many flaws that will keep it a niche activity — it is *highly* resource consumptive (to the point of being wasteful), very low output (which is the largest reason why organic dairy goods, for example, are so exorbitantly priced) and impractical for feeding billions w/o taking massive steps to take folks out of factories and offices and putting them back on farms. do you advocate that?

    but is in fact more informed by contemporary understandings of biology than the factory farm model.

    .. is also patently absurd dogma — the same knowledge is appleed to high-output farming, but in a different way. i know you want very badly to believe one is “smarter” than the other, but it isn’t. and how do i know that you want to believe? because to you, it plainly isn’t a scientific question — it is one of morals:

    animals raised in a more ethical manner

    perhaps you’d care to define what the acceptable, righteous, holy method of feeding the world’s population should be? i’m sure it doesn’t involve fencing or selective breeding of any kind, right? 🙂

    listen, i’m not naive enough to imagine you’re going to dump your religion because you’ve made these ridiculous statements to someone who can and has called you out on them. i’m sure you’ll exorcize all doubts, ignore it and move on to your next idealistic agenda item — at least, you will if the last few days of postings are any guide at all. i’m not only wrong, but probably evil in your eyes, if your postings on the global capitalism thread are indicative.

    but know that i have seen you write these words, and having the real experience of seeing that they are wrong, tried to tell you so — and that in refusing to reconsider your views, you can make no claim at rationality.

  40. So, does anyone know how else you get CJS? I know two people to have died from it in the last five years, neighbor and distant relative. Coincidence? probably, but tell me, how many people do you know personally who died from it? I still eat the occasional steak, but I have not had a hamburger in five years and may never eat another one in my life.

  41. Ken Layne,

    Well, the concern in the 1990s was merited; no one knew at the time how many people might become sick, etc.

    Anyone who thinks that American grains, etc. aren’t subsidized, meaning supported in some way by the U.S. government, isn’t paying attention.

  42. Jean Bart, most of my farm experience is first-hand and from that knowledge, most farmers in the US raise their own grains to feed their cattle, however when there are grain shortages or drops in the price of wholesale grains, US farmers respond accordingly and buy feed grains for their cattle…most of which is slaughtered at an age that is not yet known to manifest BSE. The cow that had it was an older milk cow, much older than almost all cattle raised for slaughter.

    I too lived in the UK and now it is three months, not six months for the cutoff in blood donation…I wish that it still was, cause I have a rare blood type and it is frustrating to be told that I can’t give even though I ate no beef and lived in Scotland which had only 9 or so cases of CJS…all linked to English beef. The tragic thing is that Chronic Wasting already occurs in the US. As I stated before, a large number of wild game have a form of Spongifrom Encephilitis, so long as the person stays away from the nerve tissue and brain tissue, they will be fine, but some don’t, and the most likely transfer mechanism to humans is in ground meat…like chuck or deer sausage which is not from just one cow or deer, but mixed.

    This issue is far more complicated than we can fully comprehend. Spongiform Encephalitis is sometimes misdiagnosed as Alzheimers (UPI July 22, 2003) and I still believe that it has been around since the beginning of time, we only just now had the technology to find and isolate prions.

  43. Is meat safer today than in 1903?
    That’s when Upton Sinclair wrote The Jungle
    about Chicago’s meat yards. Meat is much safer.

    Is meat safer from mad cow today than in 1903?
    Since Mad Cow had not been discovered, and could not be identified, is kind of a moot point.

    Could PETA be a suspect?
    Perhaps PETA is secretly happy, seemingly being more focused against people enjoying eating meat more than for the animal itself.

    Could Al Qaeda be behind this?
    Wouldn’t it be in their self-interest and better jihad to attack us via pork?

    Are factory farms at fault?
    No. But, this is would be a SMART time for McDonalds to take the already-being-considered lead and announce their switch away from corn fed cattle, which is the source of the E. coli problems and need for anti-biotics. To the public it will be seen as a preventive measure thus combating emotional reaction with emotional action. It will feel good. Burger King or Wendy’s could trump Mickey Dee’s by announcing first, but then what if they were left out on the limb. McDonalds can do it, make it happen.

    The Burger chains could come together in this new plan, thus not competing with each other, but competing together to perserve their share of fast food.

    Subway, Jersey Mike’s, Quizno’s, etc. should be buying advertizing emphazing chicken, tuna, anything-but-beef, and putting sale prices and a flood of coupons on those sandwiches. They can’t mention beef…not at all…but they could say,
    “tired of french fries, try this on for size” — showing their product. “Size” is a code word for less calories and french has negative connotation to many today.

    As an aside, the Paul Newman movie, HUD, which has a hoof and mouth slaughter scene is being featured this month on AMC cable channel. And of course, ole Hud was wanting to avoid doing the right thing.
    dj of raleigh

  44. dj writes: “Since Mad Cow had not been discovered, and could not be identified, is kind of a moot point.”

    scrapie, a similar spongiform disease that effects sheep and goats, has existed in Europe for over 200 years.

    Another long-known similar disease is kuru, which mostly afflicted women and children of certain groups in Papua New Guinea. They had a mourning practice where the brains of the dead would be eaten, mostly by women and children.

    But, yeah, Mad Cow itself didn’t turn up until 1986.

    According to Britannica, “although animal remains had been used as a source of dietary supplements for several decades without problems, modifications to the rendering process-specifically, reduction in the temperatures used and discontinuance of certain solvents-in the early 1980s were followed by the outbreak of BSE. “

  45. Gadfly writes: “it seems the prion is actually an enzyme,”

    Actually, it’s a protein which is folded wrong or otherwise modified from how it’s supposed to be. Enzymes in the cell are supposed to clean it up, and get rid of garbage, but the modifications in the prion protect it from the enzymes, so the prion doesn’t get cleaned up.

    This is a problem, because a prion can somehow change other normal proteins into prions. So prions multiply in the cell, gum up the works, and eventually the cell dies.

    And eventually, you wind up with a brain like a loofah.

  46. This is a serious problem, made worse by inadequate testing and allowing diseased animals to remain in the food chain.

  47. mak, you make a lot of assumptions. You need to argue less with the liberal that lives inside your head, and respond to what you read.

    OK, honesty test, mak. Does keeping cattle on a processed-corn diet lead to widespread systemic infections, requiring constant dosing with antibiotics?

  48. Does anybody know if Mad Cow is somehow related to the insecticides that farmers apply to the backs of cows? I have heard that they use phosphate-based chemicals, which coincidentally were once used as nerve gas in World War 2. Plus, is there also a link detween Mad Cow and a high manganese diet, given that excess manganese can also cause nerve damage in folks who consume soy products.

    I also heard that some scientists who tried to prove the Mad-Cow prion theory as false were either killed or dismissed as crackpots. Is that true?

  49. I find it quite strange that the United States, with all its advanced scientific and medical research technology, took the cow samples ALL THE WAY TO BRITAIN just to have them tested for Mad Cow disease, when even a local town hospital in Washington state could easily run tests for Altzheimers and Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, both of which are similar to Mad Cow. And it took TWO WEEKS for the story to reach the news, which means that a lot of people may have already eaten the Mad Cow tainted beef long then.

  50. I find it quite strange that the United States, with all its advanced scientific and medical research technology, took the cow samples ALL THE WAY TO BRITAIN just to have them tested for Mad Cow disease, when even a local town hospital in Washington state could easily run tests for Altzheimers and Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, both of which are similar to Mad Cow. And it took TWO WEEKS for the story to reach the news, which means that a lot of people may have already eaten the Mad Cow tainted beef long before then.

  51. And it took TWO WEEKS for the story to reach the news, which means that a lot of people may have already eaten the Mad Cow tainted beef long before then.

    Which mad cow tainted beef? We have yet to actually find any trace of BSE-tainted meat in the food supply.

    As for why the samples were tested in Great Britain — possibly because the disease doesn’t exist in the United States, and we therefore are understandably lacking in experts in it, while Great Britain has been dealing with an epidemic for years?

    Use some common sense, people. Just because we’re the richest and strongest nation in the world doesn’t mean we’re the leading experts in every imaginable field. 🙂

  52. As the story unfolds, seems that the farmer who said the cow was down due to calving, was not telling it like it was.

    Other strange things about this case: there is some evidence she is actually a Canadian cow who somehow made it to the US despite the embargo this summer. Five dozen cows were purchased at the same time as this cow, probably with he same COOL (Country of original label).

    With the US testing a 140 million cattle a year, and this being the first positive, a perspective can be had that can temper the panic. Also, of the millions testing positive in Europe yeilding less than 200 cases in humans, more temper might be added to the possible panic.

    Still, it is a time to act in the revision of the handling of beef in the US. Fear has little respect of truth.

  53. To add to my previous post, a copper deficiency in the diet might also make one susceptible to Mad Cow or CJD if that is combined with an excess of manganese and phosphates.

  54. Maybe the reason why the U.K. is so keen on testing the samples for Mad Cow is because the British government knows that Mad Cow disease is just one BIG money-making hoax and that the “disease” has something to do with the warble-fly extermination campaign which was conducted just a few short years before the first reported case of Mad Cow. After all, Britain is STILL the first nation to have Mad Cow, and the first nation to propose a massive chemical campaign against the parasitic warble fly, which involved the use of organophosphates, which were applied to the backs of cattle, coinciding with Mad Cow’s apparent “attack” on the central nervous system. To cover its ass, the British government was quick to blame bone-meal as the cause of Mad Cow, never mind that there has not been one case of Mad Cow that occured in non-European nations that used bone meal AND did not use phosphate-based insecticides.

    Not to mention, manganese is well known to cause nerve damage in high amounts, especially in young animals and humans who were fed soy/soya formula as kids. Coincidentally, most if not all of the cattle that later developed Mad Cow were fed artificial milk substitutes as calves, and the formulas contained high levels of manganese……

    This could get interesting.

    Could it be that high levels of manganese, coupled by a good dose of phosphates, can trigger a chemical reaction in the nervous system which alters the structure and function of the proteins in the brain and nerve cells, and turns them into destructive prions? If the answer is true, then both the insecticide and animal feed industry would ultimately be found responsible for Mad Cow, and they will surely lose a lot of money and political support, and they definitely wouldn’t want that to happen.

    Now I’m not normally a conspiracy theorist, and I’m not much of a scientist, but this Mad Cow scare just seems to be driven more by hype, scare tactics, and a shitload of cash to be made as a result, rather than logic and non-biased scientific data. And this half-baked theory, which took mere minutes to formulate and type, has STILL not been invented already by any of the brightest researchers and neuroscientists of the world, who are to this day still baffled about Mad Cow disease.

  55. It’s all a bit silly, like that story from the 70s that convinced us that peanut butter causes cancer. Just eat your meat and shut up.

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