Bobby Jindal Pulls Louisiana Out of Common Core, Is Obviously Running for President

JindalGage Skidmore / Wikimedia CommonsEarlier today, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced that he was unilaterally withdrawing his state from participation in Common Core. Jindal was once a proponent of the national education standards, but the federal government's heavy-handed way of promoting them has made him wary, he said.

Via Politico:

"We’re very alarmed about choice and local control of curriculum being taken away from our parents and educators," he said at a press conference. "If other states want to allow the federal government to dictate to them, they have every right to make that choice."

The standards were developed back in 2009 by the National Governors Association, and they initially drew support from many Republican governors, including Jindal, New Jersey's Chris Christie, Florida's Jeb Bush, and Wisconsin's Scott Walker. But the more people hear about the standards, the less they like them—unless you ask them in an outright misleading way, as the Cato Institute's Neal McCluskey notes in a hilarious post, "Common Core Survey: You'll Love the Pufferfish!."

Common Core is especially unpopular among the conservative grassroots, given that the federal government is vigorously pushing it and has incentivized states to adopt it in exchange for grant money. The controversy has made Common Core an important political issue heading into the 2014 and 2016 election cycles, and it's going to be very difficult for Core-supportive candidates to survive in the more competitive Republican primaries.

Given that, Jindal's shifting perspective on Common Core is probably an indicator that he is going to run. Education Secretary Arne Duncan, a major Core backer, knocked Jindal's defection from the cause as a transparently political move:

"Gov. Jindal was a passionate supporter before he was against it," Duncan said. "In that situation it was about politics. It’s not about education. That’s part of the problem."

Was Jindal's move a sincere change of heart or cynical political calculation? Probably the latter, but who cares? It is preferable for politicians to be flip-floppers as long as they are flipping in the direction of greater local autonomy and personal liberty.

The Core standards may not be as evil as some opponents claim, but there is very little that supporters can offer as evidence that this reform was worth adopting. On the other hand, there are many good reasons to be fearful of Common Core: Its implementation will be obscenely expensive for taxpayers, it contributes to the creeping nationalization of local education decisions, and amounts to crony capitalism for some very largely coroporate education interests.

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  • Hugh Akston||

    Question about Jindal: Will he not count as the First [something] President because he's a Republican, or will he not count as the First [something] President because nobody ever remembers that Subcontinent Indians are a distinct ethnicity?

  • Overt||

    He will not count as the first [something] President because, with the charisma of a bored squid, he will never win any nomination, let alone national election.

  • JWatts||

    " with the charisma of a bored squid, he will never win any nomination"

    I counter that with Mitt Romney.

  • Overt||

    Jindal makes Romney look like Samuel L mother fucking Jackson.

    I actually like Jindal a lot, for a GOP man. I had a lot of hope for him. Until I actually watched him speak rather than read his writings.

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    It would be worth him getting nominated just to watch the progs twist themselves into knots trying to find a way to call him a racist.

  • Libertymike||

    Alan Keyes.

  • ||

    Didn't he participate in an exorcism or something? That's at least interesting. Although it's interesting in a way that makes me uncomfortable.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Here you go:

    "BEATING A DEMON

    "Physical Dimensions of Spiritual Warfare

    "December 1994

    "By Bobby Jindal

    http://www.newoxfordreview.org.....294-jindal

    Jindal in 2012:

    "I wrote a lot of stuff in high school and college. While other kids were out partying, I was reading and writing. I'm sure some of that stuff is goofy. I just hope they don't review my grade school work."

    http://www.nola.com/politics/i....._on_e.html

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Oh, paywall for the exorcism article. Well, the second link gives sort of a summary.

  • ||

    Not a deal breaker, but it does knock him down my preference chain.

  • CE||

    When I run for political office, I sure hope no one dredges up my writings from high school. Or college. Or my mid-thirties....

  • ||

    Yes.

  • Hyperion||

    Will he not count as the First [something] President because he's a Republican

    No, he won't, and that's the reason. He's not a real Indian, you see, he's one of those Uncle Samirs. A good Indian would be a Democrat, because white privilege, or something like that...

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Well, one can see reasons other than partisan ones as to why Indians might be less than enthusiastic to embrace Jindal. He goes by 'Bobby' instead of his legal, and more Indian, name Piyush and converted to Catholicism from his parents Hinduism. That kind of thing and a few others lead some Indians to think he is something less than proud of his Indian heritage.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Because it's not as if there is a nearly 2,000 year old Christian community in India, some of whom have explicitly acknowledged the Pope for about 500 years:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S.....Christians

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Yes Eddie, that's so common in India almost 2% of the population is Catholic!

    Derp.

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    A little less than the % that identify as gay in the US. I'm sure you'll be in 100% agreement with the thundering conservatives who call homosexuality un-American.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    That's a silly comparison. Hinduism dominates Indian identity while Christianity dominates the West. If you can't see how changing your religion from Hindu to Catholicism when moving to the US might not be seen as affirming your Indian identity to most Indians it's probably pointless for me to argue the point with you.

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    when moving to the US might not be seen as affirming your Indian identity to most Indians it's probably pointless for me to argue the point with you.

    I was married to an Indian woman who converted to Catholicism, Bo, and in addition to crosses we had a little shrine for Ganesha at which incense was burned daily. She wore saris, wore a red dot, etc. Her father, a Hindu priest, regularly attended services at his local Nazarene church in addition to his normal religious obligations because doing so was not hostile to him and he rather enjoyed it. This is not to say that such behavior is universal, and that there are not those in the Indian community that object to such behavior, but it is not a monolithic thing, and you are displaying your ignorance about the nuances of it by continuing on this way. I know it's difficult for a law student to grasp but often times in the real world when you do not really understand something it's better to either shut the fuck up about it or ask questions than spout vague nonsense in the hopes that people will think you a Serious Person.

  • Libertymike||

    For my money, Bo kicks Tulpa's ass.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    So to be a Serious Person I should chuck logic and statistics in favor of personal anecdote?

    For what its worth, of course Hinduism is a pretty inclusive religion theologically, but I was talking about culture Mr. Serious Person.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Wow, dude, the Hindu population in the U.S. is even smaller than the Jewish population.

    http://www.religioustolerance.org/hinduism5.htm

    Christianity dominates American identity while Hinduism dominates India. If you can't see how changing your religion from Christianity to Hindu when moving to India might not be seen as affirming your American identity to most Americans it's probably pointless for me to argue the point with you.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Er, well I do imagine that if an American moved to India and converted to Hinduism that other Americans in India would hardly see him as having a strong American identity.

    Did you not get the point in your rush to snark?

  • ||

    A little less than

    Or half, either way.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    So if, as an American, you joined a religion followed only by 2% of Americans, that would help lead some Americans to think he is something less than proud of your American heritage?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    There might be some more relevant context in my example, right?

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Only 2%!

    http://bit.ly/1r9xmst

    (from Jewish Virtual Library)

  • The Immaculate Trouser||

    Damn those atheists and their anti-American ways. Why, they're less than two percent of the population!

    When Your Boliness bring the stupid, he really bring it.

  • Libertymike||

    If you had a kopek for every time during the 1980s that I heard somebody say that Reagan was a "turncoat" for leaving the democrat party, Mikhail Prokhorov would be a pauper compared to you.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Yes, it is me that is stupid, when you can't get this very basic analogy correct. You really think this is simply, and entirely about the percentage of Christians in India being small, and then you analogize to a person converting to any minority religion.

    See, for your example to be analogous there would have to be a nation predominately and historically atheist (or homosexual to use your other silly example), and a nation that was historically and predominately something else, say pantheistic or bi-sexual, and a person upon moving from the latter to the former would have to leave the former's dominate cultural identity and 'convert' to the latter one.

    See now?

  • Overt||

    Bo,

    If you understood anything about India, you would just shut up.

    India and Indians have a long, long, long history with Christianity. Not only have Christians migrated there for many moons, there was and has been a significant amount of Missionary work there. You may be surprised to find people from India with Spanish names (e.g. Fernandez). And, as others have noted, Hinduism by its Polytheistic nature doesn't outright exclude Christianity.

    So yes, you were being an ignorant- perhaps even racist- ass when you decided to speak on the behalf of millions of (dot)Indian-Americans and declare that he doesn't belong among them because of his religious choice.

  • Hyperion||

    How many Indians do you know? I know, have known quite a few and some of them go by American names, some don't. I think the trend these days, is to not go by an American name.

    Most Indians I have known/know, do not much like even talking about politics. They seem to be more concerned about religion and/or making money, and most of the other things that most people are concerned about on a daily basis. But I have yet to meet an Indian who will bring up the subject of politics.

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    But I have yet to meet an Indian who will bring up the subject of politics.

    I was related by marriage to a number of Indians who would not hesitate to bring up politics, but it wasn't American politics.

  • Hyperion||

    Well, ok, but when they talk about Indian politics, it's only with each other and they talk in one of the trillion plus Indian dialects that only they can understand. At least that has been true with the Indians in my work place. The only reason that I knew they were talking about politics is that they kept mentioning what's his name (Modi?), that won the election a while back, whatever they call their leader over there, the Grand Mufti or Prime Minister, whatever.

  • gimmeasammich||

    Can we get Injun to weigh in on this?

  • Hyperion||

    Where's an Injun when you need him?

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    They lost their trademark protection.

  • Hyperion||

    Great, I was planning on naming my new pet goat, Redskins. Is that racist?

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Not if you're a Democrat.

  • Paul.||

    So, first we find out Eric Cantor is a Jew, now we discover this?

    Enjoy your last term, Jindal.

  • ||

    Democrats will call him a Kim O'Hara which is the East Indian version of an Uncle Tom.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The character Kim was an Irish lad raised in India, so it seems to me that an Indian calling another a Kim O'Hara would be like a black person calling another an 'oreo.' That's not what black people mean when they call someone an Uncle Tom, at least not from what I've read, heard and seen. What they mean by that is a black person who is either too deferential to whites and/or one who 'sells out' blacks to curry white favor.

  • Hyperion||

    What they mean by that is a black person who is either too deferential to whites and/or one who 'sells out' blacks to curry white favor

    Or who vote for a Republican, ever.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Many blacks see that as equivalent, yes.

  • Libertymike||

    Or thinking that LeBron is not as good as Larry was.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    "'sells out' blacks to curry white favor."

    Did somebody say "curry?"

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I'm glad somebody caught that

  • ||

    [something]

    Asian?

    Oriental?

  • Overt||

    The reason people like Jindal supported a framework of standards was that they (mistakenly) believed it was a tool for school choice. After all, if a school could say "We meet Common Core Standards" it could head off a lot of bullshit arguments about how charters/private-voucher-accepters are sub-standard.

    The problem is that the Common Core as a standard of minimum educational requirements has become just another tool to ensure that a school spends 100% of its time teaching an exact curiculum in an exacting format with an exact methodology.

    Obviously my preference is for the government to get out of schooling alltogether. But since it ain't going to happen, the next best (for me) is a complete voucher system that allows parents and kids to choose a custom school that suits them. To get there, I think centrists and nanny's will ultimately expect these schools to prove some level of accreditation. But Conservatives should do this by encouraging the setup of multiple competitive accreditors (private) who can do this work, rather than lending support to an obviously political honey pot like national standards.

  • Pro Libertate||

    National standards with any level of detail are a bad idea, and I firmly believe the main impetus behind them are too make it harder to homeschool or operate other private alternatives to state education.

    It's not some libertarian wackiness to understand that at least part of public education is to enforce conformity. As a goal in itself.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    [Horace] Mann also suggested that by having schools it would help those students who did not have appropriate discipline in the home. Building a person's character was just as important as reading, writing and arithmetic. Instilling values such as obedience to authority, promptness in attendance, and organizing the time according to bell ringing helped students prepare for future employment.
  • Overt||

    "National standards with any level of detail are a bad idea, and I firmly believe the main impetus behind them are too make it harder to homeschool or operate other private alternatives to state education."

    Totes agree.

    But it is one of those "obvious" things that people use to fool independents. "Well obviously we need some level of standards to make sure schools aren't ripping off the kids, right".

    But yes, in practice it isn't to ensure the schools are serving the children, but rather the whims of the Proggies.

  • Pro Libertate||

    I'd prefer that any standards be set independent of the government altogether, and, even more preferably, by more than one entity.

  • Overt||

    I'd prefer that any standards be set independent of the government altogether, and, even more preferably, by more than one entity.

    Yup, I agree (which was my suggestion at the top).

    The problem is convincing centrists and independents that a private accreditation agency can keep "the taxes I pay to fund your child's education" from being squandered on a school that doesn't give them a decent 'shot' in life (because obviously parents would never do such things for their kids). On the further left, they object to "the taxes I pay to send your kid to a religious school".

    I honestly don't think its a hard argument to make, since this is how Universities operate.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Also, didn't the Common Core proposal include provisions allowing children in any school which fails to live up to certain standards to transfer to another school?

  • ||

    Was Jindal's move a sincere change of heart or cynical political calculation?

    When a Democrat does it it is bowing to the wishes of voters. A true hero of democracy.

    When a Republican does it it is a cynical political maneuver. A populist villain cowing to special interests.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Wait, what? Are you saying that Reason in general or Soave in particular do or would not criticize Democrat official's flip flops as cynical political calculation? Because they do so pretty regularly.

  • Pro Libertate||

    I don't think that was directed at Reason.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The quoted part was Soave from the OP above.

  • Kevin47||

    I think a lot of conservatives who generally support education reform liked the idea of Common Core until the government got a hold of it.

  • JWatts||

    And the academics pushing an agenda. I was slightly in favor until I saw examples for grade school kids steeped in an obvious ideology.

  • Grand Moff Serious Man||

    Once again, I find part of me praying for a Biden/Jindal debate just so we can get the treat of seeing Biden unintentionally say racist things.

    "I don't know what kind of 7/11 your family runs, but where I come from..."

  • Raven Nation||

    Which will be blamed on Jindal for "triggering" Uncle Joe in some way.

  • ||

    "Listen, Apu, they may eat monkey brains where you're from, but here we eat cows."

  • Marshall Gill||

    Should how many tens of millions of children's education be collectivized? Speak to a proponent of Common Core sometime. They will never use the word "individual" in a positive manner. Common Core, like all collectivization of human individuals, is evil.

  • DEATFBIRSECIA||

    Fucker looks like a Hindi version of Bob Denver from Gilligan's Isle!

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Good thing running for President isn't some kind of beauty contest...wait...

  • ||

    Jindal will never be president. No charisma and he is what my grandfather would call a 'fast talker'. Worse, he is a rhino to the bone.

  • Kevin47||

    He is literally a rhino? That makes me more likely to vote for him.

    Also, no Libertarian should give a shit about charisma.

  • JD the elder||

    I was just down in Louisiana, as it so happens, and the family I was staying with votes solidly Republican, and even they hate Jindal. I don't think he's got a ghost of a chance.

  • IceTrey||

    He can't be President because he's not a natural born Citizen because his parents were not citizens when he was born. He's a naturalized citizen under the 14th amendment the same as Obama. Before you ask, they were naturalized at birth by rule of law.

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