Orlando Generously Allows Residents to Slightly Control Their Own Yards

"Marijuana? No, no, that's mint."Credit: looseends / Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SALast week, Zenon Evans passed along the story of Hermine Ricketts and Tom Carroll, who are fighting the city of Miami Shores, Fla., for the right to grow vegetables in their front yard. They are suing with the help of the Institute for Justice.

Head north, though, and the City of Orlando has magnanimously decided to allow homeowners their home-grown vegetables, though they’ve packaged it within a whole host of other regulations controlling what people do with their yards. From the Orlando Sentinel:

On Monday, the City Council gave preliminary approval to rules that would allow veggie gardens to cover as much as 60 percent of a home's front yard. But they could not be planted in the public right-of-way along the street, and would have to be screened with fencing or shrubs, and set back at least three feet from the property line.

It's more garden-friendly than city planners' first attempt, which restricted gardens to no more than 25 percent of the front yard, required 10-foot setbacks and sought height limits on tomatoes and other plantings.

As in Miami Shores, the fight started when the city demanded a couple, Jason and Jennifer Helvenston, remove their vegetable garden or face fines. The city’s efforts were short-circuited when it was discovered the city didn’t actually have any rules about vegetable gardens.

So really, the new rules aren’t giving residents more freedom to decide what to do with their yards. It’s actually taking it away. The new rules require a shade tree on every lot of every new home construction – and for anybody attempting to add to their property. It also has a list of “approved” shrubs and trees and regulations for irrigation timers.

Read the whole story here.

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  • sarcasmic||

    I suppose the point of the shade tree is to keep the garden from getting full sun. Wouldn't want anything to ripen.

  • UnCivilServant||

    Does the shade tree have to survive very long?

  • prolefeed||

    It might not thrive, or even die, due to the extremely localized salty soil located right around its base and nowhere else.

    Or, it could be a ginko tree, which grows veeeeery slowly.

  • Raston Bot||

    A skinny, dead tree might make a good hop trellis.

    Speaking of which, my Chinook and Magnum rhizomes underperformed here in the mid-atlantic compared to the Mt Hood and Centennial.

  • sarcasmic||

    I gave up on growing hops. Or anything for that matter. Not enough sun.

  • prolefeed||

    You gotta be a hardcore homebrewer to grow your own hops -- in what appears to be a less than ideal hop growing environment.

  • Raston Bot||

    Sorry to hear that; their crazy growth was validation. Not much for cone production this year but apparently that's normal for year #1.

    I'm going to lager in my shed sometime later this winter for the first time. Still formulating a recipe.

  • sarcasmic||

    Typically you don't expect a harvest until year three.

    In the winter I can keep my basement in the 50s, so I've been fermenting lager down there. Then into a keg it goes to hibernate at near freezing in a converted chest freezer for a month or two.
    I've had good results so far. Last year I experimented with 6-row and corn. Trying to make American Piss, but I'm finding it difficult to make beer with that little flavor.

  • Raston Bot||

    A chest freezer converted into keg storage sounds like a badass operation. Alas, I won't have the square footage for that until the nest is emptied.

    I have no idea how the big guys produce their piss lagers. Maybe you have to ramp up the adjuncts and treat your sparge with urea acid.

  • sarcasmic||

    A chest freezer converted into keg storage sounds like a badass operation.

    Anytime I want a beer I just stroll downstairs and pull a tap. It is pretty awesome when I think about it. ;-)

  • Raston Bot||

    Ultimately, I want it piped up through the wall cavity into the kitchen to replace the cold water connection that feeds the fridge. It would even run through a filter first before exiting the door dispenser. I will do that and see how long it takes for my wife to notice my euphoria.

  • sarcasmic||

    Ultimately, I want it piped up through the wall cavity into the kitchen to replace the cold water connection that feeds the fridge.

    The stuff in the line goes flat after it sits there for a while. The longer the line, the more flat beer that comes out on the first pour. Something to think about.

    It would even run through a filter first before exiting the door dispenser.

    Filtering is usually done before carbonating, not after. Think about what would happen if you pushed a carbonated beverage through a filter. All those lovely nucleation points. You'd get nothing but foam.

    I will do that and see how long it takes for my wife to notice my euphoria.

    If she's anything like my wife she'd notice the odor from the tap before anything else. "Why does the kitchen smell like beer? Did you spill something?"

  • Raston Bot||

    aha! Thanks for setting me straight on using the filter. I've never filtered (obviously). Nor kegged.

  • Drake||

    Everyone can still have a rusting mobile home and pickup tuck on blocks in the yard, right?

  • Rhywun||

    Look in the tunk!

  • Paul.||

    a whole host of other regulations controlling what people do with their yards.

    How quaint.

  • kinnath||

    How the fuck can any government agency force a home owner to plant a tree?

    Never mind -- penaltax!

  • Doctor Whom||

    They don't even have to go so far as a penaltax. Unlike the federal government, states have general police power, and local governments have whatever part of that police power the constitution and laws of each state say they do. In short, there's much more FYTW leeway.

  • ||

    "How the fuck can any government agency...?"

    Come on now. We all know the answer to that question. I mean, how many times does this have to be explained to you people?

  • Jquip||

    It's at this point where people need to put a privacy fence around the full perimeter of their property. Just like the rich folks do. Just to force the busybodies into an awkward position.

  • UnCivilServant||

    "Your high fence is in violation of zoning ordinances. Fences can be no higher than six feet and cannot obstruct views."

    Yes, I have lived in places with zoning rules like that.

  • Doctor Whom||

    So have I.

  • prolefeed||

    But they could not be planted in the public right-of-way along the street

    I'm OK with this part, where the govt says you can't plant on land you don't own.

    The rest, though, is nanny-statism BS.

  • Rhywun||

    I have only ever rented, but... isn't this kind of stuff roundly supported by one's neighbors? In the name of "home value" or some such.

  • ||

    Yeah. Even Stossel made an argument like that when talking about the supposed freeloading of people who stalled their home foreclosure within the confines of their legal agreement with the bank.

  • Jazzizhep||

    Cheer up lads, we are a long way away from being told how much trans-fat we can consume or what size drink we can purchase--all is not lost.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Freedom.

    Horrible, horrible freedom.

  • Doctor Whom||

    If people get to plant what they like on "their" property, we'll be on the slippery slope to Somalia. Why do you Randroid loonytarians hate ordered liberty so much?

  • CE||

    Too many choices make people unhappy. Give them 2 political parties, 5 shade tree varieties, and an approved garden size with approved vegetable varieties, and they shall prosper.

  • sarcasmic||

    Freedom is asking permission and obeying orders. That way you're not responsible for anything. You asked permission. You were obeying orders. You're not responsible. Authority is.

    Liberty is what is scary. Without authority right there monitoring your every move, how will you know what to do? What if you make a mistake? Who will you blame?

  • CE||

    What if your neighbors don't plant a shade tree, and your street starts to look like Phoenix?

  • verlighsoncno1975||

    Sketches are truly nice source of instruction instead of wording, its my knowledge, what would you say?

    http://problemenmetspelling.nl.....ch-401.php

  • Paul Pot||

    I'd sell my soul for total control.
    Over you.

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