Sens. Paul and McCain Agree, We Should Cut Off Foreign Aid to Egypt

Credit: Gage Skidmore/wikimediaCredit: Gage Skidmore/wikimediaSens. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) and John McCain (R-Ariz.) have both said that the U.S. should cut off aid to Egypt.

In tweets sent out this morning Paul said that American aid to Egypt is not affected by whoever is in charge, whether it be a dictator, an Islamist president, or a president appointed in the wake of a military coup. Were the White House to classify what happened last week in Egypt as a military coup aid would have to stop. However, the White House has been reluctant to call what happened in Egypt a coup. I don't know what else you can call the military forcing a democratically elected president from power.

While Paul and McCain may be in agreement on this issue there are senators who say that aid to Egypt should continue. From The Hill:

In appearances over the weekend, Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) and Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Bob Corker (R-Tenn.) argued aid should continue to Egypt.

"What we should be doing right now is urging calmness, urging the military to move through this civilian process for as quickly as possible, to ask the Muslim Brotherhood to act with some degree of responsibility," Corker told Fox News. "Our role right now should be one of applying calm, trying to get our partners in the region to do the same thing."

Recent polling indicates that the majority of Americans do not want to get involved in the Egyptian crisis. Unfortunately, it is considered normal by many American legislators for the U.S. to be involved in situations that we would do well to steer clear of.

Since the coup there have been numerous incidents of violence in Egypt, some of which has been perpetrated by the military that recently seized power. Although the military has said that there will be elections it is important to remember that fair elections can only take place under certain conditions. At the moment Egyptian authorities are far from ready to host an election. 

Given the situation in Egypt it would be worth at the very least suspending aid to Egypt. Continued involvement in Egypt could have disastrous consequences and increase anti-American sentiment in the region. If we stop sending aid to Egypt what's the worst that could realistically happen?

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  • Hugh Akston||

    Look Feeney, it must be nice to live in your little dream world where everyone gets along, but here in the the real world there are bad, powerhungry monsters who only want to hurt and oppress their people, and the US has no choice but to write massive checks to subsidize them.

  • Loki||

    here in the the real world there are bad, powerhungry monsters who only want to hurt and oppress their people, and the US has no choice but to write massive checks to subsidize them elect them president.

    FIFY

  • froving39||

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  • Pro Libertate||

    It's not a coup? What the hell else could it be, then? An election?

    Jesus, can we get the special prosecutor and end this fucking worst administration ever?

  • RBS||

    We could just start calling coups "Egyptian Elections".

  • Pro Libertate||

    Apparently, that's exactly what this administration is doing. Congress is so useless to allow this shit to happen.

  • Loki||

    He's just dealing with this the same he deals with everything. By putting his finger in his ears, yelling "LALALA I CAN'T HEAR YOU!!!!" and then checking his watch to make sure he doesn't miss his tee time.

  • Pro Libertate||

    A comeuppance would be nice about now.

  • LynchPin1477||

    It wasn't a coup. It was a kinetic military action.

  • Anonymous Coward||

    How can it be a coup when the Egyptian military has been in charge of the government since Anwar Sadat?

  • Gladstone||

    Is Nasser chopped liver?

  • Libertymike||

    Ain't democracy grand?

  • John Galt||

    No.

    There's no more justification for good freedom loving Egyptians to be forced to live under an Islamists' rule, than there is for good freedom loving Americans to be forced to live under vile statist rule, just because a majority who vote have decided it should be so.

    People are morons. That's why democracies suck.

  • WC Varones||

    Does that make McCain a Wacko Bird?

  • Rasilio||

    "Given the situation in Egypt it would be worth at the very least suspending aid to Egypt. Continued involvement in Egypt could have disastrous consequences and increase anti-American sentiment in the region. If we stop sending aid to Egypt what's the worst that could realistically happen?"

    Um, Anti-American sentiment will increase in the region no matter what we do with regard to Egypt and stopping foreign aid will likely have just as disastrous consequences for the US and likely the bulk of the Egyptian people.

    That said the disaster is already baked into the situation, pull out or not Egypt will either revert to a totalitarian hellhole with a dictator who is either a US puppet or an Islamist terrorism supporter or it will fall apart into a Syrian style civil war. Anyway you cut it no matter what we do Egypt will not be turning into an enlightened modern mixed market democracy and large swaths of the population there will blame the US for it.

    Since what we do really doesn't matter in the near to mid term however the most sensible course of action is to pull out, stop sending aid of any sort and leave them to their own devices, then in a couple of generations of our leaving them alone they may get over the sins of our past and forgive us.

  • Mark22||

    "Disastrous consequences" like what? The Middle East isn't in our backyard, it's in Europe's backyard; let them take care of it. If we stop sending aid or military into the region, people may criticize us for inaction, but they won't blame us for every screwup in the region.

  • Gladstone||

    Ever read anything blaming US "Isolationism" for WWII?

  • Paul.||

    Europe doesn't have any money. They ran out of other people's money a long time ago.

  • grey||

    +1

    Add though, US Govt doesn't have any money that isn't borrowed or printed.

  • CatoTheElder||

    Withdrawing US foreign aid would probably bolster the popularity of the Egyptian military than continuing it.

    The real problem is determining whether the military coup is favorable to US interests. If it is, the personal financial difficulties caused by the shortfall in overt aid can be overcome with a few discrete deliveries of briefcases full of Benjamins ala Iraq.

  • MJGreen||

    SHUT UP AND TAKE OUR MONEY!

    If the Egyptian military doesn't shape up, the US is gonna have no choice but to give them another billion dollars or so.

  • Pro Libertate||

    How do we send that, by drone?

  • MJGreen||

    Subsidies for some, Hellfire missiles for others!

  • Pro Libertate||

    Legally, the Treasury could designate some drones as legal tender.

  • JWatts||

    Legally, the Treasury could designate some drones as legal tender.

    Oh hell, don't say that out loud. Someone from the IRS could read it.

  • PapayaSF||

    And we have been droning and subsidizing different groups of Islamists at the same time, even though they are hard to tell apart and they all hate us.

  • Mark22||

    Numbered Swiss bank account is probably the most efficient; much of our aid ends up there anyway.

  • albo||

    Egypt gets the money as part of the Camp David deal not to attack Israel anymore. If they're holding up that part of the deal, why should we take it away? Isn't that busting a contract?

  • Pro Libertate||

    A contract with whom? The pharaohs? Heck, if it'll make me a billionaire, send the money to me.

  • JWatts||

    Egypt gets the money as part of the Camp David deal not to attack Israel anymore. If they're holding up that part of the deal, why should we take it away? Isn't that busting a contract?

    Busting a contract. No, we are exercising our right of non-renewal. If Egypt feels like having a go at Israel, have at it. Maybe they'll do better than the Six Day War this time.

  • np||

    I propose forming the Osiris party. You know, bringing Egypt back to its roots and all. The nekkid women would be a nice change of pace

  • np||

    I propose forming the Osiris party. You know, bringing Egypt back to its roots and all. The nekkid women would be a nice change of pace

  • np||

    *damn server squirrels*

  • SugarFree||

    "Damn, girl... you lookin' real two dimensional tonight."

  • ΘJΘʃ de águila||

    U can say that again!

  • Mark22||

    "Not get involved"? After decades of sending hundreds of billions to Israel and Egypt, we are already involved. Egyptians blamed us for Mubarak and they are blaming us for Morsi. It doesn't matter what our intentions were in providing this aid. We should stop our involvement in the Middle East altogether. Let the Europeans take care of their own backyard.

  • Pro Libertate||

    This has my vote.

  • John Galt||

    And mine.

  • grey||

    Me four.

  • Gene||

    Cut and run, we've been pissing down that hole for decades and it is almost full now.

  • PapayaSF||

    Our aid makes little difference. Without extreme economic reforms, Egypt will continue down the path to starvation, perhaps just a little quicker without our billions (which we don't have, anyway). Cutting the aid might upset them a bit, but on the upside it would be replaced by aid from the Saudis and other Muslim countries. They can have the job of supporting their co-religionists, and the more they spend on preventing Egyptians from starving, the less they have for supporting terrorists and overseas madrasas and weapons aimed at Israel.

  • sarcasmic||

    Cut off aid, and without their bribes they might attack Israel.

    Oh well.

  • John Galt||

    That'll be great. That is why we pay them "aid," though.

    "Leave Israel alone and Uncle Sam will pay you both."

  • Rasilio||

    I wouldn't be too worried about that.

    Israel may have PR issues over collateral damage dealing with Hamas fighting an asymetrical war, but a stand up army vs army war with any (or even all) of it's neighbors and I'll still pick Israel in a blowout

  • John Galt||

    Israel is a much different nation than it was in 1967, or even 1973-74, for that matter. Hard to say, but they may have to go NBC to win today. Especially, if Iran, or any of the Arab nations, decides to field a nuke, or even dirty bombs. And I don't think any of want to see the kind of global destabilization that would come from that.

  • space junk||

    Our future is not in the Middle East or North Africa. We would do better to spend our (U.S.) efforts on our neighbors in the western hemisphere than worry about that region. Time to cut them lose and let them make their own way on the world.

  • space junk||

    *in the world

  • Paul.||

    I'm so confused. Didn't Springtime for Arabs just produce an election in that country, and Morsi (sometimes spelled Mursi- don't aks me why) for better or for worse, was duly elected?

  • Gladstone||

    Morsi (sometimes spelled Mursi- don't aks me why)

    Arabic transliteration, how does it work?

    Of course Obama was duly elected twice and libertarians don't seem all that fond of him.

  • Paul.||

    Why does the American media sometimes transliterate, and sometimes not? And who decides these transliterations? And Morsi and Mursi (in my mind) produce two very different pronunciations. Does the Hawaiian language suffer from these Transliterations?

    Of course Obama was duly elected twice and libertarians don't seem all that fond of him.

    You are correct about that. All 22 of us are very skeptical.

  • John Galt||

    Ernie died. Now there are only 21.

  • dbobway||

    I don't know you fine people , but can I take Ernies place and return us to 22? Fuck Egypt!

  • Gladstone||

    Why does the American media sometimes transliterate, and sometimes not? And who decides these transliterations?

    Um there are numerous ways to turn Arabic text into the Latin alphabet so the media is always transliterating. The late dictator of Libya was rather infamous for the numerous ways to spell his name.

    Don't forget Chinese! That's how Peking got turned in Beijing, Mao Tsetung into Zedong, etc.

  • Paul.||

    Glad you brought up the Chinese example. I've noticed a lot of Arabic transliteration, but couldn't think of other examples.

  • John Galt||

    The former Egyptian ambassador to the U.S. recently stated both that the military "acted appropriately" and "Twenty to 30 million people on the street here is equivalent to 50 to 60 million on Capitol Hill.”

    Whether or not they acted appropriately is a matter of opinion. That there were one hell of a lot of people were unwilling to submit is not.

    Individual liberty should be the important issue. Since the days of Athenians, far more democracies have done far more to crush freedoms than to defend or expand them.

    A minority must suffer at the whim of the majority. Tyranny of the majority, that's the beauty of democracy.

  • John Galt||

    I have to disagree with Rand on this one. We need to end all foreign aid. That should be the objective. Not punishing Egypt because it's military helped oust it's radical Islamist rulers, democratically elected or not.

    It should be worth remembering that not only did a minority of Americans want our Revolution that gave a chance at a society that respects individual liberty, but there's probably never been a time in our history when the majority has valued freedom over even an illusion of security.

  • Joec578||

    I believe that Rand wants to get rid of all foreign aid. And if that is the case, he is probably making a conscious decision to fight a battle that has a real ability of obtaining significant popular support. Just a general rant against ALL foreign aid would only limit Rand's influence. By fighting such battles Rand has become a very influential members of the US Senate.

  • dinkster||

    The libertarian purity test requires absolute devotion, otherwise your just another RINO. That is the great fault of libertarians in general.

  • Paul.||

    Egyptians are getting the coup the deserve...

  • Skip||

    How did Egypt survive thousands of years without our foreign aid?

  • JeremyR||

    The place wasn't run by Muslims then.

    That's the thing - the Middle East used to be the cradle of civilization.

    What happened to it? The people didn't change, Egyptians are still Egyptian mostly, Iranians are still Persians.

    Their culture changed.

    Turkey dragged itself out of that morass by Ataturk trying to Westernize the country and driving out radical Islam as much as possible, but it's popped back up.

  • ant1sthenes||

    Rome happened. More importantly, Genghis Khan happened.

  • Anvil||

    All foreign aid should be ended, things need fixed in this country before we should be helping others.

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    We should do now is to urge calm, urging military civilians as soon as possible through this process, requiring the Muslim Brotherhood to act a certain degree of responsibility, Koch said: "Fox News." Now our role should be an application for calm.
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