Is Egypt on the Brink of Collapse?

So warns its defense minister, who said that “[t]he ongoing conflict among the various political forces ... may lead to the collapse of the state and threaten the future of our coming generations."

The admonition from General Abdul Fattah al-Sisi, defense minister since August and director of military intelligence under Hosni Mubarak, comes as the latest protests in Egypt continue, these spurred by death sentences handed down for soccer riots last year. At least 49 were killed in protests over the weekend, with Mohammed Morsi declaring a state of emergency in three cities near the Suez Canal. A few days before those protests there were demonstrations in Cairo for the two year anniversary of the 2011 Tahrir Square protests that led to Mubarak’s overthrow. The newest cycle of unrest began late last year, in response to Morsi and his Muslim Brotherhood ramming through a heavily Islamist constitution. The campaign to get the constitution pass saw Morsi and the Islamist establishment attempt to demonize and delegitimize the opposition. In response, the opposition has repeatedly rejected offers to talk by Morsi, dismissing them as not substantive. The most recent rejection, earlier this week, came with one former presidential candidate, Hamdeen Sabahy, demanding that Morsi "announce his full responsibility for the spilled blood of Egyptians." Meanwhile, authorities in one of the three cities in which Morsi imposed a state of emergency have scaled back the curfew, and the opposition appears to be pressing advantage, extending an offer of “dialogue” themselves. Via USA Today:

After refusing Morsi's calls for talks between opposing political camps, Mohamed El Baradei, head of the National Salvation Front – the opposition coalition – called for a broad national dialogue with the president, the Muslim Brotherhood's party, various ministers and other political groups in hopes to resolve the crisis. The opposition wants Morsi to form a national unity government and create a commission to amend contentious articles of the Islamist-backed constitution.

The increasing turmoil in Egypt cut short Morsi’s trip to Europe, which he ended in Germany by defending previous anti-Semitic statements he’s made, even while a key aide called the Holocaust a hoax perpetrated by the United States. America’s shipment of military wares to Morsi’s Egypt, however, appear to continue unabated.

Get the latest on the situation in Egypt at Reason 24/7.

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  • Gladstone||

    Hey you know who else wants a "broad national dialogue"?

    Also the Arab Spring leading to some dictatorship in Egyptian. Whoever would have thunk it?

  • Hugh Akston||

    Even more unpossible is that the US is delivering weapons and truckloads of money to a Middle Eastern thugocracy.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    Well, a bunch of people "thunk" it, but they were called "Islamophobes" by a group of screeching harpies, so they stopped thunking.

  • Gladstone||

    Well they'll just blame it on the US and deny that Egypt has any actual problems or deny that the Egyptians have any agency.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    Indeed. I was involved in an academic Internet symposium on Burma, a few weeks ago. A large portion of the Burmese scholars were content to blame their current problems (e.g. the Kachin insurgency, the Rohingya, etc.) on the gringo. I wanted to slap them silly. Burma has been independent for like 60 years, and much of that time, it was closed off from the rest of the world, especially the West.

  • Gladstone||

    That's a thing that annoys me about the anti-war types. I mean sure US support for Mubarak and giving him weapons and such is bad but it's not like Egyptians (or any other people for that matter) would magically become libertarians if the US left it alone.

  • Sudden||

    The Left is wed to the noble savage notion.

  • Stormy Dragon||

    At least here, pretty much everyone agreed the Arab Spring was going to end up in an islamic dictatorship. The debate was over whether or not the US should invade Egypt to stop it, or to just let it happen.

  • 16th amendment||

    Whoever would have thunk it?

    Fox News

  • MWG||

    "Also the Arab Spring leading to some dictatorship in Egyptian. Whoever would have thunk it?"

    By using the term "leading" are you suggesting Egypt wasn't a dictatorship under Mubarak?

  • Gladstone||

    Um No? I don't recall ever suggesting that Mubarak wasn't a dictator.

    By the way I am somewhat disturbed to see Assad, Hussein and Gaddaffi defended by anti-war libertarians as a bulwark about disorder and Islamic Fundamentalism while dismissing that same argument when applied to Mubarak and Mohammed Reza Pavlavi.

  • MWG||

    "Um No? I don't recall ever suggesting that Mubarak wasn't a dictator."

    Your initial phrasing ("leading to") certainly suggested it.

    In regards to your last paragraph, I'm not at all clear what you're trying to say.

    I think as a libertarian, it's always a good thing to see dictatorships overthrown, particularly by the very people it ruled over. If Egypt really does become another dictatorship under Morsi, and that remains to be seen despite what people here tend to assume on threads related to the AS, then I'll enjoy seeing him overthrown as well.

    I may not agree with everything the protestors and rebels across the Middle East and North Africa stand for (despite what people here believe, there are secularist among them) but you have to admit, it takes serious balls to do what they doing.

  • Gladstone||

    Well your objection to "leading to" implies that Egypt is still a dictatorship. Also you didn't mention Nasser, Sadat, the British occupiers or the Alawiyya Dynasty. Does that mean you don't think they were dictators either?

    I suppose I could have phrased it better, like "leading to another dictatorship of some sort."

    As for my last paragraph well I am kind of disturbed to see people saying Gaddaffi, Hussein and Assad are bulwarks against disorded and Islamic theocracy. This would imply that strongmen are sometimes needed to keep things stable.

  • MWG||

    "As for my last paragraph well I am kind of disturbed to see people saying Gaddaffi, Hussein and Assad are bulwarks against disorded and Islamic theocracy. This would imply that strongmen are sometimes needed to keep things stable."

    Ah... on this we agree 100%.

  • Paul.||

    Springtime for Arabs!

  • Paul.||

    America’s shipment of military wares to Morsi’s Egypt, however, appear to continue unabated.

    Hope and change!

  • Hugh Akston||

    Obama is buying allies at home and abroad.

  • PapayaSF||

    Some "ally."

    I note that "Spengler" (David Goldman) has been predicting the collapse of Egypt for over a year now. When a country imports half its calories, has millions that spend most of their income on subsidized food (and food prices are rising worldwide), and gets most of its foreign exchange from rapidly-declining tourism, it's just a matter of time before it all hits the fan.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    I can't wait for Afghanigypt.

  • Sidd Finch||

    So obvious even a LaRouchey can see it.

  • PapayaSF||

    To be fair, he's an ex-LaRouchey. And if it's so obvious, why are we sending them F-16s?

  • Sidd Finch||

    This is the same bunch of Einsteins that thought Iraq had the capability to build a Uranium bomb.

    Also, you should read this if you think Spengler is anything more than a kinda-interesting-internet-guy.

  • Romulus Augustus||

    I wonder just where those four new F-16s are this evening??

  • crashland||

    On their way to Iran to help offset the hard currency that came from tourism.

  • ||

    Winter for Coptics and Jews!

  • waaminn||

    Sounds liek a pretty crazy deal to me dude. Wow.

    www.Im-Anon.tk

  • Drake||

    Egypt hasn't collapsed already?

  • Voss||

    what Henry replied I am startled that a mom able to get paid $6042 in a few weeks on the internet. have you read this site... http://www.snag4.com

  • Hyperion||

    Wow, we are getting more spambots along with more trolls. Libertarianism is coming of age!

  • Sevo||

    Somebody, outside of T-shirt purveyors, thinks we got money!

  • Hyperion||

    If the Egyptians would only figure out how to unlock the secret inner chamber of one of those pyramids, where the alien technology is hidden, maybe they would once again become the cradle of civilization and bring about world peace and a free pony for everyone! And everyone could wear really cool mascara just like in those wall murals!

  • Gladstone||

    Guess who's fault it is that the Egyprians can't find the ancient technology in the pyramids?

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    The JOOZ stole it all during the Exodus, didn't you know?

    You laugh but Zahi Hawass has basically said as much.

  • Gladstone||

    Zahi Hawass hates Israel and the US so you shouldn't be bashing him neocon. So sez Raimondo, Rockwell and Richman.

  • crashland||

    Exactly but the tech only makes plagues...

  • Death Rock and Skull||

    How could anyone have seen this coming? I mean, everyone was united at first!

  • Drake||

    Bush? Cheney? The NRA?

  • ||

    Egypt needs a radical revolution to get to something resembling a decent society. They take a long time and a lot of blood. Sun King France to Democratic France took decades of civil and continental war. Egypt, owned and operated by its military, will need just as drastic a change. And that assumes it can even happen, given its massive population, small and shrinking farmland, lack of any appreciable exports, and worsening climate.

  • Sidd Finch||

    Digging up Lord Cromer would be a lot easier.

  • Sevo||

    "Sun King France to Democratic France took decades of civil and continental war."

    And they STILL don't get it.

  • Gladstone||

    Egypt needs a radical revolution to get to something resembling a decent society. They take a long time and a lot of blood. Sun King France to Democratic France took decades of civil and continental war

    So libertarian! That means Egypt should be invading Mali right? And of lot of other countries too?

    worsening climate
    Hasn't the temperature been rather stable since 1998?

  • ||

    Yes.

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    Has Egypt been anything but on the brink of collapse in our lifetimes?

  • JeremyR||

    Simple solution - now that we have open borders, invite them all here! I'm sure once they are in the US, they'll start behaving.

  • Sbobet1st.org||

    Therefore, the Ministry of Defence who said that "[t] he ongoing conflict among various political forces ... might lead to the collapse of the state and a threat to the future of people. later versions of us. ". http://www.sbobet1st.org/2013/05/sbobet89.html

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