Three Members of Russian Punk Band Pussy Riot Sentenced to Two Years in Prison

In spite of the international outcry, three members of the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot were found guilty today for "hooliganism" motivated by "religious hatred." Their punishment is two years in jail, which is less than the previously mentioned feared sentences of three and seven years, but is still disappointing to the women's supporters.

Russian dissident supporters of the women have also been detained when they came to the court room to rally around the band. Hundreds of people chanted outside for the women's freedom as well.

Still, inside of Russia, support for the band is low, no matter if Paul McCartney and Madonna are on their side, and even though the object of their protest, President Putin, even said the women's punishment should not be too harsh. But that it is, of course, up to the court. The court that called the women's protest "blasphemous." 

The women's blasphemy was less than a minute of protest inside of the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in Moscow. That church is owned by the Russian government. The women apologized for any religious offense their performance of "Punk Prayer" (including the lines "Mother Mary, drive Putin out!") caused, saying they intended it to be purely political — or at least a critique of the Russian government and the Orthodox church's too-close ties. But that, and their insistence on using the word "feminist" to describe themselves (as well as, ya know, a slang term for female genitals) doesn't endear them to conservative folk in Russia.

Back in February, just days before their arrest, Vice did an interview with the band. A particularly endearingly optimistic passage:

VICE: So what inspired you guys to start Pussy Riot?
Kot: 
Pussy Riot came to action around the end of September 2011, right after Putin announced that he was planning to return as president and brutally rule Russia for at least 12 more years.

Serafima: Right, and at that point we realised that this country needs a militant, punk-feminist, street band that will rip through Moscow's streets and squares, mobilise public energy against the evil crooks of the Putinist junta and enrich the Russian cultural and political opposition with themes that are important to us; gender and LGBT rights, problems of masculine conformity, absence of a daring political message on the musical and art scenes and the domination of males in all areas of public discourse. 

VICE: Why 'Pussy Riot'?
Garadzha: 
A female sex organ, which is supposed to be receiving and shapeless, suddenly starts a radical rebellion against the cultural order, which tries to constantly define it and show its appropriate place. Sexists have certain ideas on how a woman should behave and Putin, by the way, also's got a couple thoughts on how Russians should live. Fighting against all that - that's Pussy Riot.

The rest here.

In other interesting reactions to the kerfuffle, Counterpunch.org had an argument with its self about whether the international outrage over this band is fake or not. Writer Mike Whitney scorned the U.S. media for ignoring U.S. atrocities, including the prison-industrial complex (fair enough), while focusing on Putin as a boogy-man, yet somehow concluded that Putin is popular inside Russia and therefore the situation the women of Pussy Riot find themselves in is okay. Thankfully, Chris Randolph wrote a scathing rebuttal to the general failure of lefty solidarity that Whitney displayed.

Two years in prison could be worse, but it's still a bleak reminder that states will do what they like with people who make a fuss— even with such a large backing of international support. And in all cases, in all countries where people end up in prison for terrible reasons, these women have families back at home, two of them have young children. Meanwhile, the rest of the band remains free, apparently in hiding, hoping to stay anonymous. Check out the Wall Street Journal's liveblog for updates on the case. 

ReasonTV recently visited a solidarity concert for the band outside of the Russian embassy in DC.

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  • RBS||

  • Randian||

    Let me guess: a bunch of irrelevant "facts" that imply that LRC is OK with Pussy Riot being locked up, but they of course would never exactly say such a thing. Oh, and Putin apologia.

    *checks*

    While one hesitates to applaud when an individual faces incarceration by the state, it is remarkable how little time is spent considering the rights of the targets of these protests.

    Fuck you, Lew Rockwell.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Ah, Rockwell isn't all bad. Without him, where would Tulpa go to get his fix for prison libertarianism?

  • Randian||

    Look at the lead post over there:

    Romney Bought by Koch To Get Ryan
    Posted by Lew Rockwell on August 17, 2012 09:03 AM

    KOCHTOPUS LOOMS LARGE.

  • RBS||

    Hahaha, I saw that too. LRC is a daily read for me. It's basically a daily reminder of why nobody takes libertarians seriously.

  • Randian||

    Apparently Ecuador defying Britain is somehow a blow against the American Empire. I had no idea that our Emperor was so powerful that he could get a sovereign nation (Sweden) to manufacture sexual assault charges and then get another sovereign nation (Great Britain) to enforce our will.

    Indeed, the American Empire is mighty.

  • NotSure||

    I don't know why you are joking about this, it is no secret that America pushed Sweden to go after pirate bay, likewise their push in New Zealand to go after that internet entrepreneur, both were driven by American interests first. You seriously believe America would not use sexual allegations to bring down a man that is truly hated by the government ?

  • Randian||

    I call this "Inverse American Exceptionalism", wherein no other nation is apparently capable of misfeasance of its own accord.

    It can't possibly be the case that Sweden has an interest in pursuing sexual assault charges: it must be the American Empire forcing Sweden to invent these charges. It can't be that Britain has a national interest in Julian Assange; it must be the Empire pulling their strings.

    It's a joke.

  • sloopyinca||

    I'm gonna have to go mostly with NotSure on this one, Rrandian. I'm not gonna say the US government initiated the charges, but I've no doubt they are pushing for his extradition so they can exploit them.

    Look at the case. It may be the flimsiest cases ever and under no circumstances would they satisfy the threshold of even having charges brought in a civilized nation, yet GB and Sweden are inexplicably creating an international incident out of it.

  • Randian||

    I think you're viewing this through American-colored eyeglasses.

    I too have little doubt that the United States has an interest in this, but that does not mean that the Great US Empire is pulling all of the strings. It is possible for other nations to be uniquely awful in certain things.

  • NotSure||

    I am not American, but I do smell the stench of American pressure all over this. American does not respect other countries sovereignty if it stands in the way of its interests. And it is very much in Americas interests to take down Assange.

  • Randian||

    I am not American, but I do smell the stench of American pressure all over this.

    Your sense of smell is not evidence.

    American does not respect other countries sovereignty if it stands in the way of its interests

    Apparently neither does Great Britain. But that's still America's fault, or so your Toucan Sam nose tells me, anyway.

    And it is very much in Americas interests to take down Assange.

    Yes and that is proof of...?

  • NotSure||

    Britain does not have a national interest in Assange, because he did not expose British secrets. Sweden is not even charging him, they simply want to question him, thats a lot of powerful men doing a lot of work wanting somebody simply for questioning.

    So whats left, I guess it can't be American pressure, cause thats crazy conspiracy theory stuff, America would never do such things.

  • Randian||

    Britain does not have a national interest in Assange, because he did not expose British secrets.

    Right, because you are privy to the internal workings of Her Majesty's government.

    Sweden is not even charging him, they simply want to question him

    So that formal arrest warrant is just made up?

    The Swedish prosecutor says that a second round of questioning is apparently pro forma in their legal system.

  • Paul.||

    I call this "Inverse American Exceptionalism", wherein no other nation is apparently capable of misfeasance of its own accord

    I like that, Randian. +1 internet to you.

  • sloopyinca||

    You seriously believe America would not use sexual allegations to bring down a man that is truly hated by the government ?

    I fail to see what Clarence Thomas has to do with this.

  • Brutus||

    It's too bad the Koch boys aren't Jewish, it would just make all this so much easier.

  • RBS||

    You left out the False Flag part:

    Does Chelysheva funnel State Department money to the members of Pussy Riot through these front groups? It would not be the first time such support is covertly given to an organization seen as undermining a foreign leader viewed as out of favor with Washington....
  • Randian||

    There is so much fail in that blog post that we may as well just repost the entire thing so the Commentariat can take it apart faster than four-year-olds attack a pinata.

  • ||

    He starts inventing more rights, like the right to not see women put vegetables in their vaginas at the grocery store. He's like our conservative friend from a few weeks ago who claimed the "right" to not be offended by what is on television.

  • Randian||

    More goodness from the Yokeltarian crowd:

    In the United States, of course, laws against disorderly conduct and trespass are on the books in virtually every state carrying a variety of penalties including jail time...So the offense is not uniquely punished in Putin's Russia. Let's get that out of the way.

    Really? So the contemplated sentence for trespass and disorderly conduct is seven years in prison?

    Falsely reported as a "punk prayer to the Virgin Mary," the poem they recited was in fact grotesquely scatological and objectively disrespectful and blasphemous. It was not a prayer of any sort, and in fact was a kind of a vulgar parody of the beliefs and rituals of believers.

    So what? I guess that makes the specific charge of "blasphemy", which represents the merger of Church and State, okey-dokey to the alleged freedom-fighters over at LRC.

  • Lucy Steigerwald||

    Not to mention, did the described actions by Voina (the performance group containing one Pussy Riot defendant, some of which sound political to me, others just bizarre and pretentious...) warrant two years in prison? Apparently not. Almost as if this IS a political punishment, hmmmmm.

  • Randian||

    You're just saying that because you are in the Orange Line Mafia, Stag. Real libertarians support the stoning of gays, the jailing of blasphemers, and implying that black people are inferior.

  • Lucy Steigerwald||

    Upon further reading it seems like some of the Voina actions could have received the same "hooliganism" charges of seven years, but it doesn't sound like anyone got them. Hmm.

    Well, regardless, the Rockwellian summation is still super irritating.

  • mnarayan||

    TBH I don't see what you all are complaining about either. The U.S. has laws & Russia has laws — basically they're indistinguishable.

  • Randian||

    Ha!

  • nipplemancer||

    Holy motherfucking shit! It's one of the most elusive of all creatures on HyR - The Mythical and Mystical Ampersand!

  • o3||

    i haz an envy

  • Fatty Bolger||

    The code is cracked! Ampersands for everybody!

    Long live the &!

  • Randian||

    Hmm. Testing Hit&Run part 1.

  • mnarayan||

    Can also use ﹠, though TBH they both look kind of retarded.

  • Randian||

    Seriously, what is your ampersand secret? The Collective demands you share.

  • Paul.||

    Intellectual property belongs to the people!

  • Amakudari||

    Haha.

    It is remarkable how little time is spent considering the rights of the targets of these protests. What about the right to go into a grocery store and not see women placing food items inside their private parts?

    The appropriate response to these scenarios is to firmly escort them off the premises. If there's a crime here, it's worthy of a fine and a few days in jail. Who cares about performance art protests? Seriously.

    What about the right to religious activity free of scantily clad women screaming expletives at the Lord, the Virgin Mary, and the local Patriarch?

    What about that right? It would be insipid in the US but is far, far more insidious in a state where the church is just an arm of the State. I mean, come on, the patriarch is ex-KGB, a personal acquaintance of Putin and breathtakingly corrupt.

    The best thing to do, in any case, would have been taking the moral high ground. It was right there. But no, they went the statist thug route, which troglodyterian Rockwell obviously approves of, and gave the moral high ground to attention whores.

  • Hyperion||

    Blasphemy, LMAO. Right now, Obama is sitting in a corner somewhere in the WH, pouting, but also longing, drooling for the day when someone can be jailed on blasphemy charges for ridiculing his greatness. He will probably be on Airforce Uno soon on his way to great mother Russia to kiss King Putins ring and bow to him.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    I think you got it backwards. Right now Putin is longing, drooling for the day when he can just drone the life out of someone rather than having to go through the whole rigamarole of putting them in prison, waiting for everyone to forget about them and then quietly paying the guards to dipose of them.

  • Aresen||

    Not only that. Given the nature of Russian politics, Putin knows he will be shredded if he falls.

    Obama will just go on to become an "Elder Statesman" worshipped by the press. (At least until he is put on the SCOTUS bench by a future Team Blue administration.)

  • Dr. Frankenstein||

    "motivated by "religious hatred." In Russia they don't even pretend anymore do they.

    Don't forget to make your religious sacrifices to Caesar.

  • Brett L||

    Now I want to start a punk band called Free Pussy. Riot!

  • Whiterun Guard||

    Green Day is the greatest punk band ever.

  • Brutus||

    They're pretty good, but I'm old school: The Ramones are the best.

  • Randian||

    Some days I think we're all trolls.

  • The Unknown Pundit||

    Some days?

  • Proprietist||

    LOL. No.

  • Professor Booty||

    Green Day is a punk band? Huh.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    I'm still thinking about throwing myself off a bridge in front of Lucy just so she'll tackle me.

  • Lucy Steigerwald||

    Don't make me violate my principles, bro. Come on.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    Like you could tackle me anyway. I'd fake you out of your shoes, suckah. Deion couldn't catch me and neither will you.

  • Hyperion||

    You can easily be taken down with an arrow to the knee, we all know that, so don't tempt us...

  • Whiterun Guard||

    Favor the bow eh? I'm a sword man myself.

  • R C Dean||

    but is still disappointing to the women's supporters decent human beings everywhere.

    In the United States, of course, laws against disorderly conduct and trespass are on the books in virtually every state carrying a variety of penalties including jail time...So the offense is not uniquely punished in Putin's Russia. Let's get that out of the way.

    Let's see here, maximum penalty in Texas for criminal trespass is . . . Class B misdemeanor, $2000 fine and 180 days in jail. For disorderly conduct, Class C misdemeanor, $500 fine.

    Now, if the trogertarian could come up with even these max penalties being applied to political protests in the US, I would be impressed.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    From what I understand there has not been a single political protest in the US since Bu$h was impeached and put in prison for war crimes.

  • o3||

    update - bushitler got off cause of the stupid

  • Aresen||

    The Russian Orthodox Church is funded and supported by the Russian government. In return, he church leaders have been slavish in their devoton to Putin and his thugs.

    There should be no surprise at this verdict.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    I don't think anyone is surprised by the verdict.

    The only thing that surprises me is that the sentence was only two years. I was expecting five.

  • Brett L||

    Just long enough for Putin to get the FSB back up to speed.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    This is why we have Free Speech Zones. To show how much better we are than the Rooskies. Free speech is fine, in its proper place and context, but the Constitution is not a suicide pact!

  • Randian||

    Try to be an adult.

  • Whiterun Guard||

    We'll see what our blasphemy law produces the next time the Phelps clan does the God Hates Pussy Riot thing at a military funeral.

  • o3||

    i cant wait for enraged folks to stomp the phelps's flat und take the assult charges. wonder if a local jury would convict?

  • Randian||

    Putin's Russia continues to live up to expectations:

    Gary Kasparov arrested, beaten, and detained at demonstration.

  • Brett L||

    Its not like they shipped him off to some gulag in Siberia. Progress, man.

    /sarc

  • Whiterun Guard||

    You know who else beat Gary Kasparov...

  • Proprietist||

    They deserve a slap on the wrist for trespassing and disorderly conduct, but two years of hard labor is patently absurd and seems like political oppression. Then again, we lock up people for years for possessing weed, and Bradley Manning is still sitting in jail without a trial. At least trespassing is a legitimate crime.

  • Randian||

    Can't tell if serious.

  • DJF||

    Why, don’t you think that trespass is a legitimate crime? Also its against the law in many place in the US to disrupt a religious service.

  • Randian||

    Of course I think trespass is a legitimate crime, though I would rather it be handled in civil court than criminal court.

    The false equivalence that Proprietist and P Brooks are drawing is where I rankle. In Russia, Manning would have been sentenced to death in a show trial ages ago. In Russia, weed possession is likely punished much more harshly than here. But because the United States commits some injustices, they say, we have no reason to criticize other countries in any way.

    It's a crap argument.

  • Proprietist||

    Didn't say that at all. We can certainly criticize Russia for extreme overreaction and political oppression - in fact, I just did. And I agree it could have been handled civilly and that the church had a legitimate tort against the band.

    Just pointing out that we disproportionately punish actions that are far less legitimately criminalized than trespassing. Happens every day, everywhere in the world.

  • Randian||

    Just pointing out that we disproportionately punish actions that are far less legitimately criminalized than trespassing.

    Yes, and Russia disproportionately punishes those same crimes on an even larger scale.

    So what was your point again?

    There is only one reason to bring this up: to draw equivalence between Russia and the United States, and it's completely false.

  • Proprietist||

    The fact that Russia punishes these same victimless crimes worse than America does doesn't change my argument that extreme punishment for victimless crimes is worse than a ridiculous punishment for a crime that is legitimately criminalized. America vs. Russia equivalencies has nothing to do with it.

  • Randian||

    That's your argument? Is that even relevant to this article?

    That is lame sauce, Proprietist. "I'm just sayin' the United States does bad stuff too...but I'm not drawing an equivalency!"

    Are there not enough threads on this board for all of us to point out the United States' flaws that you felt the need to shoehorn a completely unrelated point, by your own terms, into this one?

  • Proprietist||

    ???

    I'm comparing trespassing, which is a legitimately criminalized action, with possessing weed, which isn't. Can I run on your property and start screaming racial slurs from your front lawn, and then justifiably bent out of shape when I get arrested and claim my freedom of speech was violated?

    The fact that Russia's punishments for both possessing weed and trespassing are more ridiculous than America's has nothing whatsoever to do with my point. PR deserves a light "slap on the wrist" (like a $20 ticket) for criminal trespass, but certainly not two years of hard labor. The reaction of the government is ridiculous and undoubtedly politically motivated. I don't know what more you want me to say.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I'm thinking Vulgar Parody Would be a pretty bitchin band.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Dear Randian-

    Fuck off, bootlicker.

    xoxo

  • Randian||

    I see the 'be an adult' thing sort of missed its mark.

  • Randian||

    Fuck off, bootlicker.

    Only Real Libertarians draw ridiculous equivalencies.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    You miss MNG, don't you?

  • ||

    Well, that motivated me to finally take LRC off my Google News feed. Fuck, Lew.

  • ||

    Er, Reader, not News.

  • Archduke PantsFan||

  • mr simple||

    In Kiev, a bare-chested feminist activist took a chainsaw to a wooden cross bearing a the figure of Christ in the centre of the city.

    That seems unnecessarily dangerous. I hope she was at least wearing eye protection.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    But because the United States commits some injustices, they say, we have no reason to criticize other countries in any way.

    Holy shit, Kreskin!

    ON THE NOSEY!!!!!

  • Randian||

    If you want to craft an actual response, go right ahead. Right now, until you refute the point, I call them the way I see them. The only rationale for you calling me a "bootlicker" is that you think Russia and the United States are exactly the same.

    Don't get mad that you get dirty; you created the mud in the first place.

  • ||

    Went through this with Cyto last week.

    Is it a particularly Objectivist belief that all nations can be neatly and inarguably ranked according to how "good" they are, rendering those higher on the scale immune to criticism when discussing those lower on the scale?

    If so, who decides this list? Who reviews it? Where is it published?

  • Randian||

    It is not this Objectivist's contention, if that is what you mean.

    However, I find it tiresome that in a thread about Russian malfeasance, some feel the need to point out the mote in the eye of the United States. We are talking about people who were subject to seven years in the gulag for "blasphemy". Does that mean the United States is immune to criticism? No. Does that mean it's appropriate or rational to draw an equivalence of any kind? Well, not in this case.

  • Proprietist||

    My point: PR was wrong to trespass, the Russian government is totally wrong to turn a minor offense like trespassing into a trip to the gulag. But many people who do things that aren't wrong at all (victimless crimes) get punished with equally ridiculous sentences.

    Has nothing to do with America or Russia. Russia's justice system is worse than America's undoubtedly, and I don't think anyone here claimed anything to the contrary.

  • Randian||

    Again, you are either pointing out a benign, well-known fact that bears no relevance to the thread, or you are implying something else.

    Everyone here knows that people are routinely punished for things they shouldn't. It seems strange you felt the need to mention the American justice system in a thread about the Russian justice system if you weren't trying to compare the two.

  • Proprietist||

    It's not irrelevant. We all agree the punishment given is absurdly unmerited, yet we seem to disagree if any punishment for their action is a violation of their rights.

    PR was not completely in the right because their crime violated the property rights of the church, and thus even in libertopia they would deserve some minor punishment for their actions. This is unlike people who face similar or worse punishments for crimes that do not violate the rights of others. Even ignoring any mention about America, relative within the Russian justice system that statement holds true. It's a perverted and backwards system without rule of law.

  • ||

    I'd be down with a libertopia system in which private property is held so sacred, if you trespass on it, you can be shot in the face without warning.

  • mr simple||

    Like if I'm running down the street and I trip and fall onto someone's land, they're justified in shooting me in the face? I have to say I'm against that.

  • ||

    The false equivalence that Proprietist and P Brooks are drawing is where I rankle. In Russia, Manning would have been sentenced to death in a show trial ages ago. In Russia, weed possession is likely punished much more harshly than here. But because the United States commits some injustices, they say, we have no reason to criticize other countries in any way.

    If you are worried about false equivalences then why do you feel the need to repeatedly point out that Russia is supposedly worse in these respects? The reality is that there is less rule of law in Russia, of course, but there's also less likelihood of getting fucked with for a lot of victimless crimes like dope and prostitution. But none of that is germane to the point.

    The point being that they broke the law and should be punished but not nearly so egregiously. Not to mention the fact that this makes martyrs out of them.

  • Randian||

    And a lot more chance of getting busted for "blasphemy", "hooliganism" and politically motivated prosecutions like Khodorkovski's.

  • ||

    Really, have you been there? I have, and I have a couple of good friends that live there.

    Regardless, this has nothing to do with anything, so why do you insist bringing it stuff up and then bitching about false equivalences?

  • Randian||

    See how the chance of getting prosecuted for blasphemy in the United States is, well, zero, I don't think I have to go to Russia to find out for myself.

    Regardless, this has nothing to do with anything, so why do you insist bringing it stuff up and then bitching about false equivalences?

    Please re-read the thread. As far as I can tell, there are two reasons to bring up the problems with the American justice system into the Russian one: A) you are trying to draw an equivalence or downplay the 'badness' of this verdict or B) you are way off topic.

    You choose.

  • Proprietist||

    I brought up two examples in the "American justice system" - weed possession (a victimless crime) and Bradley Manning (a guy that violated workplace policies and should have been fired, but harmed no one and is now being held without trial for a politically motivated action).

    I'm comparing the crimes themselves and pointing out that the weed possessor and Bradley Manning are also being disproportionately and unfairly punished for their actions yet didn't actually violate anyone's rights vs. the PR stunt which did actually violate the church's property rights.

    I can be angered by all of the above, but my anger for the treatment of PR is only because I'm sympathetic to the message they are being punished for, even though I admit they did something wrong. We wouldn't be nearly as upset for a KKK member arrested and getting a harsher penalty for hurling slurs through a black family's window at 3AM.

  • NotSure||

    Crime and Punishment, in Russia, I should write a book about it.

  • Proprietist||

    Again, Randian: if Slappy walked on a random Mexican family's front yard and started screaming racial slurs through their window, he would be rightly arrested for trespassing and potentially also charged with a hate crime and intimidation. While most of us hate crime laws shouldn't exist, they do and are technically adding extra punishment for the politically incorrect content of one's speech.

    Even without a hate crime charge, a prosecutor would be more likely to seek (and a jury more likely to levy) the maximum possible punishment for trespassing due to the content of his speech and provocative intent of the trespass. If Slappy went to jail for two years, we'd all agree it was ridiculously disproportionate to the harms caused, but I doubt any of us would be quite as offended or outspoken about the "violation of his freedom of speech" if only because we disagree with the content of his speech.

    Certainly no one would be considering Slappy an oppressed hero, except for white supremacists who agree with his message. Since we agree with the content of PR's message speaking against Putin, religion and the political system in Russia, we are more empathetic to their plight. But in both scenarios, they committed a real crime and received a disproportionate punishment for the content of their speech.

  • Sanjuro Tsubaki||

    The last word on this doesn't come from Lew Rockwell or Putin or the press. It comes from one of the band members:

    http://boingboing.net/2012/08/.....temen.html

  • mr simple||

    Well played. I hope people read this.

  • Emmerson Biggins||

    I can't believe Lew went over to Russia and locked up those pretty girls. That was pretty mean.

  • EJ Raines||

    Maybe we could take up a collection and get a hooker to give Randian his enema? Lord only knows, he's gone overdue again.

  • Mike M.||

    Sadly, if you gave Randian an enema, his brains would fall out.

  • Randian||

    Yokeltarians.......ASSEMBLE!!

  • Colonel Slanders||

    Green Day puts the "Pussy" in Pussy Riot. Hell, Pussy Riot could probably kick their collective asses. The greatest punk band ever? The Anti-Nowhere League!.

  • Proprietist||

    Green Day's not even the best punk-pop band ever. They fall somewhere far, far behind the The Undertones, Ramones, the Buzzcocks, Shonen Knife (seeing them tonight!), the Descendents, etc.

  • JeremyR||

    I've not convinced this couldn't happen here.

    What if say, Ted Nugent decided to do something like this at that church Obama used to go to with Rev. Wright?

    You think he wouldn't be arrested for a hate crime?

  • CE||

    It's funny hearing the TV and radio types reporting on this story while studiously avoiding any mention of the name of the band.

  • blubi||

    A very slanted article: it was only a minute, they apologized, for what exactly? They sang "god is shit" at the cathedral altar, which has nothing to do with Putin, why is this not mentioned?

    And the hypocrisy: If it were the KKK at a black church, or neonazis at a synagogue, they would be facing time in the US too and there would be no outcry (such bold expressions would never occur within a mosque because they require true boldness).The only difference is the ideology, in this case apparently it has something to do with feminism.

  • Atlanta Roofing||

    This is crazy for a band standing up for women's right to be sentence two years in prison. I heard that Madonna and Elton John asked for the Band members to be released.

  • Orlando Roofing||

    I also heard that American artists asked for their release. I can't believe this has happened to women stand for their rights.

  • numnumnum||

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