A New Government Agency I Can Support

Kansas GOP gubernatorial candidate Sam Brownback is proposing an "Office of the Repealer," tasked with seeking out bad or repetitive laws, wasteful programs, and archaic state agencies for elimination. As a general rule, the media venerates politicians who propose new government programs as bold and visionary, while anyone daring to suggest perhaps there might be cause to eliminate an agency or two is depicted as some fringe draconian nut. Or just quaint and silly.

True to form, New York Times reporter Monica Davey makes little attempt to hide her bemusement at Brownback's idea, dismissing its positive reception among Kansas voters as "one more sign, perhaps, of the wave of grumpiness" sweeping the country. Not prudence or good governance or fiscal responsibility. Grumpiness.

I suppose we could just cast this off as one more example of silly Kansans being too stupid to know what's good for them. But hold on. Davey also reports that—clutch the pearls!—the sentiment may not be limited to the Sunflower State:

In Missouri, lawmakers passed legislation this spring that repealed more than 200 sections of statutes, including some dusty ones pertaining to the regulation of steamboats, steam engines, pool halls and margarine. In Michigan, lawmakers did likewise, agreeing, for instance, to repeal statutes that had designated as crimes prizefighting and dueling.

God forbid we repeal laws regulating the operation of steam engines. Why, it would be like living in Somalia.

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • skr||

    Oh yeah it all well and good until the children start dueling again.

  • ||

    You say that like its a bad thing.

  • ||

    As soon as I finished reading the article I knew the first comment would contain a joke about dueling. Predictable but still funny.

  • Some Guy||

    Sir, you have offended me...

    /gloveslap

  • LarryA||

    OTOH I could get behind duels for politicians.

  • Ghost of Alexander Hamilton||

    Easy for you to say, knave! It didn't end so well for me!

  • ||

    Well, only an idiot would act like a gentleman when facing a cad in a duel.

  • ||

    Repealing moronic laws is something libertarians do. Those strange creatures that we don't understand and can't be bothered to understand. They might also drink coca tea and post on libertarian websites. Damn, I can't tell if I'm getting cranked on coca or the 240mg of caffeine I just had in my Sugar Free Rockstar. Or the hydrocodone I just took. Or all of them.

  • &||

    Repealing moronic laws is something libertarians do try to do.

  • Pedant||

    Repealing moronic laws is something libertarians do try to might do if they ever got into power.

  • ||

    Repealing moronic laws is something libertarians might futilely try to do if they even one of them ever got into power elected.

  • &||

    To summarize: repealing moronic laws is a libertarian fantasy.

    But one of these days, Alice...

  • ||

    "To summarize: repealing moronic laws is a libertarian fantasy."

    Which is actually occurring in Kansas.

    (Aside: interesting that some folks still read comments first and articles econd)

  • Warty||

    "You got your uppers in my downers!"
    "You got your downers in my uppers!"

    Yeah, this coca tea is awesome.

  • ||

    I'm pretty jazzed right now. You can tell this by the fact that I used the word "jazzed". Yup, I'm pretty high right now. Coca tea FTW. Where is NutraSweet?!? Oh right, he's in NOLA.

  • Naga Sadow||

    What? What's he doing next to me again? Everytime he's around I feel as if the angry eyes of STEVE SMITH are upon me.

  • SWC Bullies||

    I'm pretty jazzed right now.

    PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH*PUNCH

  • AA||

    Which one of the teas did you get?

  • ||

  • AA||

    Sweet

  • Suki||

    I like sweet tea too.

  • AA||

    As long as it has Coca alkaloids.

  • Almanian||

    Epi, Monica Davey said you sound "grumpy. She, on the other hand, sounds "typical".

  • Warty||

    So it's legal to duel in Michigan again?

  • Naga Sadow||

    The meadow at noon, sir!

    Have your second consult my second.

  • &||

    They're called "peeps" now.

  • Warty||

    The idea of shooting you is delightful, good sir, but not delightful enough to entice me to set foot on the foul soil of Michigan.

  • Naga Sadow||

    Hmmmmmm. Firearms? I don't know. Perhaps blades or blunt weapons . . . what would piano wire count as?

  • hmm||

  • Hamas Himmy||

    Frozen cod fish at 4 paces.

    Ah, that takes me back to the time the boys and I were meeting at a favorite hole in Jukkasjärvi when Mossad agents attacked us with frozen cod fish baring sharpened scales. I wasn't cut fortunately, but falling over yourself to flee from fish being hurled at you and then hitting your head against a wall made out of ice can hurt like a mofo.

  • Suki||

    Awesome! I haven't seen a good Naga duel in ages! Naga, baby, please don't get too dismembered this time?

  • Beth Donovan||

    At first glance, I thought I saw "frozen cod piece at 4 paces". Then I realized if frozen cod pieces were involved, that 4 paces would be an unlikely distance.

  • ||

    But you can begin the duel with the epithet, "You codpiece-sniffing dotard."

  • ||

    I can see why you call Michigan's soil "foul," but that's only on the east side of the state.

  • ||

    Slaps Warty across the face with leather glove.

  • Suki||

    Leather is my favorite material.

  • ||

    That's just foreplay to Warty, John. And he doesn't reciprocate. He's so selfish.

  • ||

    You poor poor fellow. More tea to drown your sorrows? Perhaps a bridge skank or two as a pick me up?

  • ||

    Just some hydrocodone whilst tanning by the pool, you quack.

  • Warty||

    I reciprocate, Epi. Just not to you.

  • Robert||

    Wow, they just slipped that one in there after "prizefighting". Maybe they're as incautious repealing statutes as enacting them -- but I'd've thought the columnist would've been like, "WARNING! Lark's vomit" about that one.

  • Suki||

    Warty, if I lend Naga a knock-off South Korean katana, do you promise to give it back to me when you are done chopping him up?

  • ||

    I ahve been thinking that a limited form of I&R would be good for this. Initiative and Repeal.

    Limited to the repeal of laws only, petitions are presented to put a law on the ballot for repeal, if 51% vote to repeal, the law is gone.

    The legislature can re-pass something, but they are at least on notice of what the voters do not want, so they have some impetus to craft something more reasonable to the voters.

    Think drug laws, firearm bans, etc.
    The voters are braver than politicians.

  • qwerty||

    This is an awesome idea.

  • ||

    Why limit it to LAWS?

    Most of the damage is done by rules issued by the unelected agencies.

    Also, the bar is set too high -- if only 33% of the voters think that a law or a rule should be eliminated, it should be gone.

    Along with the author of the rule or law

  • Some Guy||

    The voters are braver than politicians.

    The only things I have less respect for than politicians are voters. At least the politicians understand what they're doing.

  • ||

    Really? Do you not remember ObamaCare (to name but one recent example)? And you can say with a straight face that politicians understand what they are doing?

  • Some Guy||

    Yes, I think that they knew EXACTLY what they were doing there. If they thought they were actually doing something good, their talking points would have been vastly different.

  • Geotpf||

    In most states, it is completely possible to do this via the normal initiative/proposition process.

  • hmm||

    Office of the Repealer

    Job Description:
    To repeal, with extreme prejudice, any politician that fails to uphold his oath of office.

    Qualifications:
    Athletic ability-to run down politicians and swing blunt objects
    Generally pissed-off disposition
    Preferred large 6' plus and size 13 plus feet individuals
    Firearm training preferred
    General disregard for authority preferred
    General disregard for blood sucking politicians

  • hmm||

    Missouri isn't all bad. There is a sense of Midwestern common sense. Sometimes.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Down here in Springfield, the do-gooders are trying to get a blanket smoking ban in place. Even for the cigar bar downtown, the cigar/pipe tobacco shops with smoking areas, and other similar stupidity.

    Thankfully, we have one of our own on city council, but at best he'll only have two others on his side. Which means the anti-smoker/anti-private property goons will likely win. Yay.

  • hmm||

    Ahh Springfield.

    Baptist church, liquor store (Brown Derby), strip club, chinese restaurant, Baptist church, liquor store (Brown Derby), strip club, chinese restaurant,Baptist church, liquor store (Brown Derby), strip club, chinese restaurant...

    On every single block.

  • AA||

    Sounds like quite a place.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    There's an alternative to Brown Derby now, and only fifteen minutes west of Springfield:

    http://republic.macadoodles.com/

    GREAT store. Hundreds of beer selections, thousands of wines... awesome place.

    Oh, and there are some Lutheran and Catholic churches in the area, too, though I don't partake of religion.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    PS Now it's Mexican restaurants on every block. NTTAWWT.

  • Almanian||

    They smoke blankets in MO? Weird

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    No, no... it means there are still exemptions to the smoking ban, but wouldn't be if the Politically Correct Behavior-control Candyasses have their say.

  • Smarmy NYT Journo Douchebag||

    God forbid we repeal laws regulating the operation of steam engines. Why, it would be like living in Somalia.

    Sounds like someone's a little grumpy today...

  • alan||

    True to form, New York Times reporter Monica Davey makes little attempt to hide her bemusement at Brownback's idea, dismissing its positive reception among Kansas voters as "one more sign, perhaps, of the wave of grumpiness" sweeping the country. Not prudence or good governance or fiscal responsibility. Grumpiness.

    To be fair, 'grumpiness' was not her first choice of words. She first wrote in 'quaint' to describe the idea, but then she remembered that she worked for the New York Times.

  • qwerty||

    Golly, can't we all just accept the greater wisdom of our superiors in government? Those darn proles are grumpy because they never seem to want to do what we tell them.

  • Warty||

  • materialmonkee||

    Meh I'm blaming Loughborough for that one

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adidas_Jabulani

  • +HoM&Ms;||

    That is simply a fantastic trollface.

  • Byron||

    Did a 5 year-old Photoshop that? Ridiculous...

  • Johnny Longtorso||

    My fantasy constitutional amendment combines harsh term limits, a 2/3 (at least) supermajority in both houses required for laws to pass, and an automatic 5 year sunset clause for every law. If you can't keep 2/3 support, the law deserves to die.

    I find my ideas intriguing and wish to subscribe to my own newsletter.

  • IceTrey||

    It would be simpler to just repeal the 16th and 17th amendments.

  • ||

    Simple =/= easier; Longtorso's idea may be somewhat more feasible. I will be expecting Satan to marry a snowman named Chris and to go ice skating for his honeymoon before the 16th and 17th are repealed. I would love to see both repealed, as I am a big fan of the Fair Tax and I believe very strongly the demise of our country can be traced directly to the ratification of the 17th.

  • Pedant||

    Don't forget the 19th.

  • Ed Minchau||

    I think Robert Heinlein had that same idea in The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress.

  • ||

    States tend to be encrusted with old and silly laws, many of them relics of past popular panics over some crime or scandal.

    Ohio has a law (or at least used to) making it a crime for a music teacher to seduce an underage pupil. Of course, it was already a crime for an adult to seduce a child, but apparently there was an outcry about a particular case, the public (or perhaps the newspapers) demanded the politicians "do something," and nobody wanted to seem obstructionist by pointing out that no new laws were needed.

  • Thomas Friedman ||

    y pointing out that no new laws were needed.

    The epistemology of that escapes my grasp. No new laws needed?

    If we can't adapt the laws on a day by day basis to keep up with all the change that is going on in the world how can we function as a society?

    We need strong, pragmatic leadership and a flexible, positive basis for the law like they have in China.

    This reactionary nonsense undermines everything we are trying to achieve.

  • Mirror Universe Monica Davey||

    The proposal for an "Office of the Repealer" by Sen. Barbara Boxer, is a great idea that needed to be implemented during the Bush administration, but at least now we're on the right track with this sensible proposal.

  • Thomas Friedman ||

    Now that the right people are in place there is no reason why we shouldn't keep the Patriot Act. Looks like Janet Napolitano has some good ideas about how we should use it.

  • Cass Sunstein||

    Sounds reasonable to me.

  • ||

    We're on board with you, Czar Sunstein! (clicks heels together).

  • materialmonkee||

    "relics of past popular panics over some crime or scandal"

    Reminds me of a town I grew up near, I'm Welsh and used to go out drinking in the nearest town in England called Chester, where an old 15th century law makes it legal to shoot a Welsh man inside the city walls after dark.

    http://www.chesterwiki.com/Shooting_the_Welsh!

    500 years later and we're still causing trouble there

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8WSAKKXbKo

  • Stewie Griffin||

    Look at him. He runs like a Welshman. Doesn't he run like a Welshman? Doesn't he?

  • ||

    So you CAN shoot a Welshman outside of the city walls at night, or inside of the city walls in the day? Well, that sound reasonable.

  • Tuong-Lu Kim, City Wok Owner||

    Oh no. It's those god-damn Mongorians again! (runs across to the other side of the wall.) top! Stop right there, Mongorians! God-damnit, stop! Stop breaking down my shitty wrall, you stupid Mongorians! (arrives at the place with the Mongolians.) Ay, you sons of bitches, you- (sees that there are twigs covered in clothes, and a tape recording of the Mongolian's noises.) What the hell? Oh Shit! (sees the real Mongolians on the other side of the wall, knocking the wall down.) OH, GOD-DAMNED MONGORIANS!! (runs across the other side of the wall) I'm gonna get you, fuckin' Mongorians! Don't break down my city wrall! (Mongolians break down the wall, and then they leave) OH, GOD-DAMNIT!! That's the rast time you're gonna break down my shitty wrall! You hear me, Mongorians?! (starts rebuilding) God-damned Mongorians.

  • AA||

    Shouldn't it be "Shitty" Wok? T o keep with the accent spelling?

  • Mr. FIFY||

    No, b/c in that episode, Mr. Kim had built a wall to keep out the Mongolians because they kept raiding the town and destroying his restaurant.

  • iamtheeviltwin||

    We are seeing this in Kansas now. They just passed a new "No Texting while Driving Law"...of course I thought an officer could use existing Reckless Driving Laws to pull over people who are texting...but what do I know...

  • ||

    Did Brownback give any credit to Pro Libertate for this idea?

  • ||

    It does seem vaguely familiar. Of course, my version includes yanking people out of office. But I'm all for a retroactive veto.

  • Hobie Hanson||

    "God forbid we repeal laws regulating the operation of steam engines. Why, it would be like living in Somalia."

    Ever heard of a slippery slope?

    I have a feeling Brownback's governmental Grim Reaper would be more likely to cut midnight basketball and less likely to cut abstinence education. This office would become as politicized as any other.

  • ||

    If you're waiting for bad laws and wasteful programs to be cut in a non-politicized way, then you'll be waiting a long time...

  • Hugh Akston||

    Is that the law that bans playing basketball at midnight or the one mandating it? In either case, repeal away.

    Ideally, the office of the Repealer General will be filled by popular election, with candidates trying to outdo one another with what to cut.

  • ||

    I believe that's the law that steals money from random citizens in order to hire unionized public employees to referee teams of kids playing a sport they're capable of playing on their own, on the theory that this will stop * other * forms of theft from happening.

  • Almanian||

    That's the one

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    At least that would be a start, Hobie.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Still waiting for Hobie to explain how cutting midnight basketball = slippery slope into the abyss of doom...

  • Hobie Hanson||

    How like a libertarian to spout off on something he knows nothing about. Have you kept abreast of the research on the aftermath of cutting social programs like midnight basketball?

  • Mr. FIFY||

    You brought up the slippery slope argument, Hobie. Now, tell us just how fucking successful midnight basketball really is, and why if so, it can't be paid for by the private sector.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Didn't you get the memo? Only government-run social programs can save us. D'oh.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Without a State-approved facility and referee, people are no longer capable of playing basketball at all.

    Within weeks water turns a sickly yellow color, magnetic anomalies render compasses worthless, birds fly around in circles and then dive into powerlines en masse.

    Within months the area is lost to plagues of zombies and all communications cease. Entire towns need to be quarantined and nuked from orbit (it's the only way to be sure).

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Does Soylent Green come into existence somewhere after the demise of government-run after-hours youth basketball programs?

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Either that or Skynet and cyborgs running around looking like humans and whatnot. Or maybe some kind of Logan's Run-style future.

    However, it DOES all start going to hell when a steamboat loaded with margarine crashes into a pool hall.

  • PhD in Sexy||

    Have you kept abreast of the research on the aftermath of cutting social programs like midnight basketball?

    Deprive the kids of their midnight basketball they go back to shooting one another? What is the downside?

    Why are you here?

    It certainly isn't to educate because you are clearly lacking.

  • PhD in Sexy||

    And, of course we are familiar with the 'latest reports'. Many of us being professionals in the social sciences soled our souls for ill gotten monies to write the damn things. Here is where we come together for a little soul searching and honesty. Damn your cracker ass and condescending tone for being too stupid to realize that you are merely a victim of the propaganda that we put out there.

    The last field report on the matter I was involved in had me interviewing three dozen teens selected by a community center receiving fed dollars.

    I grew suspicious because none of those kids had a jump rebound or three point position ability for shit. In one of the back rooms was a little print shop where other teens were rolling out t-shirts with the big Obama logo prints. What was really odd was how when the shirts were exposed to heat they perspired without even being worn. I rubbed my finger in the liquid then put it on my tongue. A little metallic to the taste but really not much of anything.

    I forgot about it until an hour later in the middle of an interview, the kids started laughing, and I asked what was so funny. It hit me, I was tripping balls, and the kids knew it before I did.

    The whole midnight basketball set up was nothing more than a front for elaborate LSD based brain washing and mind control. Do they tell you that in those professional journals, eh? The truth to what those of us who do the field work are subjected to? No. They dish out prettied up platitudes like lady fingers at a society lady's luncheon. It isn't like that at all in the field you ignoramous. The lady fingers are ACTUALLY A BAG LADIES FINGERS CUT OFF AND LEFT SCATTERED IN AN ALLEYWAY BECAUSE SHE WOULD NOT LET GO OF THE FUCKING BASKETBALL SHE MISTOOK FOR A NEWBORN BABY IN HER FUCKED UP HEAD SO THE KIDS WENT HUTUTUTSIE WITH A MECHETE!

    Is that real enough for you, Hobbie? Or do you need a GODDAMNED flowchat?

  • Suki||

    Don't fear The Repealer.

  • ||

    MORE COWBELL!

  • Hugh Masekela||

  • ||

    +2

  • Robert Reich||

    We don't need laws.

    Now that we have the right people in charge, the nation can be managed by decree.

    I have been on the phone to Hugo Chavez, asking about the proper procedures for nationalizing an oil company.

  • ||

    The Lollipop Guild has been trying to get a hold of you, Mr. Reich. You might want to ask Fidel and Raul Castro about how such a scheme plays out and how that is working out for Cuba.

  • Anomalous||

    I can't stand Robert Reich. He's always trying to borrow money from me, telling me he's a little short this week.
    (rimshot)

  • ||

    I'm surprised there isn't more wailing and gnashing of teeth over the fact that Sam Brownback- proud member of the American Taliban- is co-opting libertarian rhetoric and being spoken well of here without strenuous qualifications. There are certainly times when such purity tests are counter-productive, but there is also a very real concern that out-of-power Republicans will once again use libertarian rhetoric to win office and then proceed to destroy the reputation of such rhetoric once they get in office and continue to mouth free market platitudes while producing voter-alienating big-gov't disasters. See: 1980, 1994, 2000. Brownback is the kind of creep who'd happily sign a law for public stoning of gays and atheists, I would be very wary of being seen as "on the same side" as him.

  • ||

    Brownback is the kind of creep who'd happily sign a law for public stoning of gays and atheists, I would be very wary of being seen as "on the same side" as him.

    Yeah, think of all the cocktail parties you wouldn't be invited to.

  • ||

    A feature here, Tulpa, not a bug.

  • Suki||

    Brownback is the kind of creep who'd happily sign a law for public stoning of gays and atheists, I would be very wary of being seen as "on the same side" as him.

    As long as they pay for their own weed like everybody else, I'm all for it.

  • cynical||

    "Brownback is the kind of creep who'd happily sign a law for public stoning of gays and atheists,"

    That sounds a little archaic. If that law passes, it should be repealed. By the Office of the Repealer.

  • ||

    The evidence for Brownback being "the kind of creep who'd happily sign a law for public stoning of gays and atheists" is what, exactly? Sorry, I haven't followed the guy.

  • ||

    Since the majority of H&R thinks throwing stones is not lethal force, I don't see why that would be such a big deal. It's just a rock, it can't hurt you.

    Maybe that only applies when Mexicans throw rocks. The brazos ain't as fuertes as they used to be, I guess.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Who here says rocks can't kill, Tulpa?

  • Your Martian Buddy||

    Back away very slowly, Libertarian Guy, ease out quietly, you have been lured into and tricked into a thread about the Intifada. Now make your break! Run, for it, man! With all you have got!

    Hello Mosad,
    Hello Intifada,
    Greetings to you,
    from planet care nada . . .

    Life is cooler here,
    Than in an air conditioned Mazda,
    Bet you would rather
    Be on Mars than in Gaza.

  • ||

    You missed the "Evil Border Patrol Officer Shoots Innocent Mexican Kid" thread. I hate to spoil it, but it featured Fluffy espousing the novel doctrine that you have no right to self defense if your assailant is across a property line from you.

  • ||

    Dueling's back? Looks like these'll sell real well:

    http://www.zazzle.com/honk_if_.....9228435737

  • ||

    They should have it in the style of base closing commission, with an up or down vote all of the laws to be repealed. They better include the drinking age of 21 in there.

  • ||

    LOL, yeah right we shall see about that.

    Lou
    www.anon-posting.at.tc

  • Tony||

    seeking out bad or repetitive laws, wasteful programs, and archaic state agencies for elimination.

    All our problems will be solved if we just call in the Merry Maids of the GOP.

  • Gov't Hack||

    As long as Merry Maids are unionized, we're OK with it.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Who knows, there might be archaic anti-gay laws still on the books, but Tony over there is more concerned with an oil spill that happened on Obama's watch and blaming it on a guy who hasn't been in office for two whole years. Yep, Bush repealed every law and safety regulation. Every one of 'em. It's chaos!

  • Suki||

    What if it was a gay plot to destroy America? Huh, huh, huh?

  • Mr. Slave||

    Jesus Christ!

  • ||

    Come on, Suki, all good conspiracy theorists know the real cause was a North Korean submarine attack!

  • Mr. FIFY||

    A steam-powered submarine loaded with midnight-basketball players coated in margarine, headed for the nearest pool hall?

  • Suki||

    Are gay midnight basketball players more flamboyant than the other kind?

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Tony, I thought "All our problems will be solved" was a campaign ad for Obama. What gives? Why didn't he keep his promise?

  • Tony||

    Thanks to George Bush and the republicans, the worst environmental disaster in human history is occuring in the gulf, but yes, let's worry about repealing archaic laws.

  • Hugh Akston||

    You're not even trying anymore.

  • James||

    You want the candidate for governor of Kansas to campaign on fixing the oil gush in the Gulf of Mexico? I guess it might work, considering your average voter.

    Troll smarter, not harder.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Tony, will ANYTHING ever be Obama's fault?

  • Tony||

    How DARE you criticize Obama.

  • Suki||

    Racist!

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Am not! :p

  • Louis Farrakhan||

    Oh, yes, you are. ALL white men are racist. And evil.

  • Obama's White Half||

    Um... do I count?

  • Louis Farrakhan||

    Whenever laws benefit the Evil White Devil, yes you are to blame! You are sleeping with the enemy, knight-errant!

  • Warty||

    Fucking poor effort, even for you. D-, you idiot.

  • George W. Bush||

    Heh! I got away with it, Dick! That li'l submarine thingy worked like a charm!

  • ||

    let's worry about repealing archaic laws

    Yeah, the GOP should be following Obama's recent lead, and going to concerts and political fundraisers!

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    Hey, the less time he's doing presidential shit, the less damage he can do.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    So, let's recap Tony's argument:

    Apparently, Brownback's concept is somehow preventing Obama from solving a problem caused by Bush, who has not been president for a full two years, and apparently there is not one safety regulation on the books and that's Bush's fault ex post facto and that is why oil is still gushing into the Gulf...

    Gonna need a flow chart to diagram this one. Who here is good with Excel?

  • Suki||

    MF,

    Flow chart? Two dots, one line. Bush - disaster of the day, done.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    THAT explains this hangnail. Fuckin' Bush.

  • ||

    Should use Viseo for this not Excel...

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Sorry, thanks, that would work better.

  • ||

    IF campaigning for office as a Democrat;

    AND problems exist;

    THEN blame Bush;

    AFTER reelection, GOTO step 1.

  • Hobie Hanson||

    That's pseudocode, not a flowchart, moron.

  • The Libertarian Guy||

    It's also how things are, Hobie. Proud, are you?

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Apparently, midnight basketball can be used to seal the Gulf oil leak, or something. Hobie really isn't being coherent, but he is tugging all the right heartstrings.

  • Suki||

    Anybody know what is wrong with Facebook right now?

  • Huge Mastaka||

    No problem with Facebook. The other side of the Earth just got smelted by a solar storm so your friends in Asia and Europe are dead.

  • Suki||

    They are the ones who feed the server squirrels? Has said it is unavailable due maintenance since before I made the comment last night.

  • Hugh Akston||

    uh, the people who use it?

    Just a guess.

  • ||

    I propose we make a napping party. The only pertinent issues will be napping time allotments, barriers to napping, and ridding ourselves of frivolous lawsuits: http://lawblog.legalmatch.com/.....liability/

  • Cartman||

    Hobie Hanson|6.13.10 @ 10:38PM|#

    How like a libertarian to spout off on something he knows nothing about. Have you kept abreast of the research on the aftermath of cutting social programs like midnight basketball?

    Will somebody put this retard out of his misery?

  • ||

    Midnight basketball?

    Oh, right, that was based on the theory that young negro men would stop going out and shooting white people if they had somewhere to shoot hoops in the middle of the night.

    That whole "superh uman negro criminal" thing had a lot of folks upset in the mid90s didn't it.

    All the way from Ron Paul (they were very fleet footed) to the Presidink his own self.

  • ||

    I think a better name would be "Office of Abolition and Repeal," i.e., OAR, because that's exactly what you need thrown to you when you're up (fiscal) shit creek.

  • ||

    Office of the Reaper!

  • ||

    I frequented an online forum in the mid-1990s where the right/left/middle ALL agreed on exactly the same thing--a unit of government whose sole purpose was to eliminate unneeded laws!

    We further agreed that ALL new laws should have a "sunset clause" where if they're not renewed (like every 7 years or so) then they automatically become null and void. That would allow horrible laws like those "War on Drugs" laws to go quietly into the sunset as no lawmakers want to vote against them for fear of being called "soft on crime" by their opponents come election time.

    chicopanther

  • ||

    I think you'd need a constitutional amendment to make that work. (it would also be able to remove laws that were already on the books.)

    Fat chance of such an amendment passing, as every public sector union in the galaxy will dump all the money they have into the campaign against it.

  • Ed Minchau||

    every public sector union in the galaxy will dump all the money they have into the campaign against it

    You say that like it is a bad thing. But what happens when they lose and don't have any money left?

  • ||

    I see this as part of the trend of theocon nutjobs campaigning as libertarians or fiscal conservatives, then reverting to type once in office. McDonnell and Cucinelli in Virginia were the leading wave of this. Libertarians are so desperate for electoral validation that they are unwilling to challenge the libertarian credentials of these people. The long term outcome is that we may acheive a few minor policy goals, but at the cost that the Libertarian brand will be inextricably tainted in the public mind. Yes, the personal beliefs of candidates do matter; these people are not to be trusted.

  • ||

    I'd volunteer to man the post of "Ridiculer-General", and mercilessly mock the stupid ideas for legislation that drop out of some people's mouths...

  • Adam||

    Not to be a debbie downer, but the steam engine law actually has some merit. I operate a 1920's Case Steam Engine and exhibit it at shows...its a very complex machine that requires hours of training to operate. Without that, you might invite a tragedy like this... http://www.farmcollector.com/S.....agedy.aspx

  • Snorri Godhi||

    Actually I'd go much further than that: I'd remove all powers to initiate legislation from the Senate, and charge them exclusively with repealing legislation. (And you can throw in regulation and gov. programs if you like.) And I do not even define myself libertarian!

  • masstexodus||

    The State of Texas does something like this with its "Sunset Review" of agencies. Any new law should have a sunset provision requiring an affirimative vote to keep it alive every 10 years or so.

  • ||

    This reminds me of Frank Herbert's science fiction series of years ago about the "Bureau of Sabotage". They were a great read and more than a little prescient.

  • ||

    Here's an idea for a new law:
    make Democrats pay P more taxes than everyone else since they are so generous.

  • Dwane St.Marie||

    One more example of how the liberal media continues to tip public opinion toward socialistic practice and the democratic party.

    I for one have ended my reliance on mainstream media for opinions. They have come to dislike capitalism and are failing at it from coast to coast. Never trust a business sector who is fighting for it's own survival.

    Mt new motto, Save America - Subpoena Media

  • دردشة||

    thanks

GET REASON MAGAZINE

Get Reason's print or digital edition before it’s posted online

  • Video Game Nation: How gaming is making America freer – and more fun.
  • Matt Welch: How the left turned against free speech.
  • Nothing Left to Cut? Congress can’t live within their means.
  • And much more.

SUBSCRIBE

advertisement