Fork Ready Projects

Forget streets paved with gold, a road lined with chicken is the way to go. First "The Colonel" introduced KFC's 99¢ Ultimate Value Menu. Now he's offering to fill pot holes for cash-strapped cities:

"This program is a perfect example of that rare and optimal occurrence when a company can creatively market itself and help local governments and everyday Americans across the country," said Javier Benito, exec VP-marketing and food innovation at KFC.

Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson noted in a statement that budgets are tight for cities across the country, and finding funding for road repairs is a dirty job. "It's great to have a concerned corporation like KFC create innovative private/public partnerships like this pothole refresh program."

Naturally, KFC isn't doing the hard work for free. In exchange for its labor, the Kentucky-based chicken chain stamps "Re-freshed by KFC" into its repair, and only for the first four cities that take the offer. But Advertising Age reports that this style of good-will marketing is on the rise:

Jens Bang, president of Cone, a Boston-based cause branding and corporate responsibility firm, said that recent scandals on Wall Street and in the banking industry have built up consumer skepticism, and "corporate marketers have to be concerned about building trusted relationships with their core stakeholders."

...Charmin provided a public restroom in Times Square [and] also developed an application for iPhone and BlackBerry that helps consumers find toilets when the need arises. Samsung has installed electrical charging stations in many major airports to help travelers stay connected while in limbo.

The Chicago Tribune says Chi-town officials aren't too keen on the idea, mostly because it would compete with the city's own pothole repair promotion. And because "[w]e don't allow any type of printing or advertising placed on a city street or sidewalk," said Brian Steele, a spokesman for the Chicago Department of Transportation.

Perhaps in these lowly economic times, however, cities should consider accepting sponsorships if they are having difficulty providing basic services themselves. Plus, having image-conscious companies take care of road repairs might cut down on scenes like the one below:

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  • Christ on a Cracker||

    I promise ya'! Two chickens in every pothole!

  • ||

    I'd rather have KFC stamped in the road then the massive crevices that currently occupy Chicago's roads.

    Regards,
    TDL

  • ||

    I'd rather have projects be fork ready than pork ready. If the folks at KFC are willing to pick up the tab in exchange for a little free (to the taxpayer) advertising, more power to 'em. Even if their chicken is too greasy for my tastes.

  • ||

    Years from now, in the Taco Bell future, people will stare at you in wonder when you tell them that you can remember a time when KFC wasn't only a road repair business, but actually was a fast food joint too.

  • Stagman||

    This looks like a win-win for everyone except government no-bid contractors, which of course ensures that it'll never catch on.

  • EJM||

    Any word yet from the other Yum! Brands-owned chains (Pizza Hut, A&W, Long John Silver's, and [ironically enough] Taco Bell)?

  • ||

    Taco Bell will have you shitting in potholes for days.

  • JLM||

    The first time I saw that pic of the possum under the yellow line, the subtitle was "That's not my job".

  • Taktix®||

    There's a low hanging curveball with Long John Silver's and potholes, but I'm too burnt out right now...

  • Kolohe||

    people will stare at you in wonder when you tell them that you can remember a time when KFC wasn't only a road repair business

    I got my law degree from Costco, but I was only able to get in because my dad's an alum and was able to pull a few strings.

  • nothinghead||

    Shouldn't the title of this post be "Spork Ready Projects"?

  • ||

    This looks like a win-win for everyone except government no-bid contractors, which of course ensures that it'll never catch on.

    Indeed, the streets are owned by the leeches in government, not by the people.

  • JB||

    Chicago officials don't want it because it would show them up.

    Potholes are a continually problem in Chicago and the government does a poor job of fixing them.

  • ||

    I'd rather have KFC stamped in the road then the massive crevices that currently occupy Chicago's roads.

    Massive crevices is no understatement. Every time I have to drive outside my neighborhood results in at least one pothole-inspired "HOLY CRAP!" from me. "Cavernous" is the word. You have to be nuts to drive around Chicago in anything but an SUV or a beater.

  • ||

    Er, I think I meant either "an understatement" or "no overstatement". I blame the Avec Les Bons Voeux.

  • ||

    For those of you that have never seen that picture before, welcome to the internet.

  • ||

    I don't know what the big deal is about potholes. All the ones I've ever blew out a tire on were filled...with water.

    Bastards.

  • Bon Railey||

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvLDFtaL5HI

  • ed||

    "We don't allow any type of printing or advertising placed on a city street or sidewalk"

    Headless torsos, however, are still permitted.

  • ||

    Not only will this save cities money by not having to repair the roads with taxes, but I'm sure KFC will do it cheaper than government would. Wouldn't it be great to live in a world where you paid for the things you need and want? I'd love if companies maintained the roads they need for customers to get to them.

  • mbt||

    hi,
    everybody, take your time and a little bit.ghsrthsr

  • Frequent Urination||

    I have subscribed to your amazing feed, Expecting to get great updates!!

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