Celebrities Are Economic Hypocrites When They Attack Free Markets

It's easy to be a socialist when you have $100 million.

I'm annoyed that so many Hollywood celebrities hate the system that made them rich.

Actor/comedian Russell Brand told the BBC he wants "a socialist, egalitarian system based on the massive redistribution of wealth."

Director George Lucas got rich not just from movies but also by selling Star Wars merchandise. Yet he says he believes in democracy but "not capitalist democracy."

Actor Martin Sheen says, "That's where the problem lies ... It's corporate America."

And so on.

On my TV show, actor/author Kevin Sorbo pointed out that such sentiments make little sense coming from entertainers. "It's a very entrepreneurial business. You have to work very hard to get lucky, mixed with any kind of talent to get a break in this business. I told Clooney, George, you're worth $100 million—of course you can afford to be a socialist!"

It's bad enough that celebrities trash the only economic system that makes poor people's lives better.

What's worse is that many are hypocrites.

Celebrities who support big-government politicians routinely take advantage of tax breaks, which reduce the amount they contribute to that government.

It's nice that Obama supporter Bon Jovi has a foundation that builds houses for poor people, but at tax time, the musician labels himself a "farmer." He pays only $100 in state property tax. And his tax dodge gimmick: raising honeybees.

Bruce Springsteen sings about factories closing down but pays little tax on the hundreds of acres of land he owns. His dodge: An organic farmer works his land.

Hollywood's campaign to "save the earth" brings out the most hypocrisy. Actor Leonardo DiCaprio recently announced, "I will fly around the world doing good for the environment." Really? Flying around the world? I'm amazed they're not embarrassed by what they say.

Maybe they don't know how clueless they are because reporters rarely confront them about their hypocrisy. Hollywood reporters want access to celebrities, and posing uncomfortable questions reduces that access.

To fill the gap, Jason Mattera, author of Hollywood Hypocrites, confronts hypocritical celebrities.

He and his cameraman located Harrison Ford after the actor had himself filmed getting his chest hair waxed. Ford said the pain of ripping out his chest hair should make us think about the pain the earth feels when trees in a rainforest are cut down. Chest hair, rain forest—get it? But that environmental message came from a celebrity who owns seven airplanes. Ford once even flew his private jet to get a cheeseburger!

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  • Pro Libertate||

    The surprise to me is that people listen to the political, economic, and scientific opinions of individuals who are, more often than not, not very educated and not very intelligent in any broad sense. Not that undereducated, not very brainy entertainers having dumb views is surprising.

    On top of all of that, the entertainment world in general has a dramatically leftist bias, and the left-leaning media, of course, focuses on the people who say things they like.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    AM radio feeds the heads of millions with the blithering idiocy of Limbaugh, Hannity, and Beck all day long.

    None of those three have any formal education.

  • WTF||

    Don't lock eyes with 'em, don't do it. Puts 'em on edge. They might go into berzerker mode; come at you like a whirling dervish, all fists and elbows. You might be screaming "No, no, no" and all they hear is "Who wants cake?" Let me tell you something: They all do. They all want cake.

  • ||

    What I'd like to know is, WTF, why are there retarded people in this thread with the other commenters?

  • tarran||

    They let anyone comment these days.

  • WTF||

    Mrs. Episiarch, we're doing our best to weed them out, but some of these retards are extremely clever.

  • ||

    I've changed, WTF. People change. Changes...I'm not the same Episiarch who informed on those blind orphans. I'm not the same Episiarch who revealed the hiding place of those Guatemalans...such as yourself. And I'm not the same Episiarch who took a crap in the Fleischmanns' holly bushes...last night.

  • Hyperion||

    We libertarians are expressing our true tolerance, as opposed to the fake tolerance of the left, by permitting PB, the retard, to post his mindless drivel.

  • soflarider||

    Mindless drivel can be informative and sometimes even entertaining.

  • John||

    You have to keep them off the streets somehow. You would think that a country as rich as ours could provide some kind of sheltered workshop and communal home for people like Shreek instead of letting him comment on the internet without any supervision.

  • Loki||

    why are there retarded people in this thread with the other commenters?

    "So one day, Mongo gets out of his cage..."

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    You've taught me a lesson. I must not insult Team Red hacks. Makes WTF very angry.

  • WTF||

    BUSHPIGS!!11!!!!CHRISTFAGS!!11!!!!

  • From the Tundra||

    How about a recipe? You got a good one for chile verde?

  • WTF||

    Authentic Chili Verde (Pork and Green Tomatillo Stew)
    "This is a wonderful Mexican dish of pork simmered in tomatillos and chiles, Makes a great borrito with spanish rice and refried beans."
    Ingredients
    o 6 lbs cubed pork stew meat
    o 1/4 cup vegetable oil
    o 2 large yellow onions
    o 6 cloves garlic, minced
    o 1 tablespoon sea salt
    o fresh ground pepper, to taste
    o 1 tablespoon ground cumin
    o 4 1/2 quarts chicken broth
    o 8 fresh poblano chiles, seeded and chopped
    o 4 fresh jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
    o 2 yellow bell peppers, seeded and chopped
    o 3 lbs fresh tomatillos, husks removed
    o 1 cup cilantro leaf, coarsely chopped
    Directions
    1. In a large stock pot over high heat sear the pork in the vegetable oil until browned.
    2. Remove the pork from the pot, reserve 3 tablespoons oil in the pan.
    3. Saute the chopped onion and garlic seasoned with salt and pepper in the reserved oil until onions are tender.
    4. Add the cumin, then stir in pork and chicken stock.
    5. Simmer for 1/2 hour.
    6. Add in poblanos, jalapenos and bell peppers.
    7. Puree the tomatillos and cilantro in a blender, and add them to the pot.
    8. Cook for an additional 30 to 45 minutes.
    9. Serve with Mexican/Spanish rice and refried beans.

  • From the Tundra||

    Fuckin' A. Much obliged, amigo.

  • WTF||

    De nada.

  • ||

    Being a border dweller for 25+ years and a culinary delver, may I recommend ditching the peppers and tomatillos and substituting them with 4 lbs of roasted green chiles of the long john variety at a spice level you enjoy.
    We call it Caldillo or Green Chile Stew.

  • mtrueman||

    Sounds good. If I can find some tomatillos, I will kosher it up and give it a try.

  • ||

    Ground Turkey is a good substitute for the pork. Brown it in 1" blobs.

  • ||

    boneless, skinless chicken thighs.....

  • ||

    Heck with that. I walk two hundred feet and have the best authentico Mexican food in the Central Valley (Ca.).

  • some guy||

    You've taught me a lesson. I must not insult Team Red hacks. Makes WTF very angry.

    We don't have a problem with insulting Team Red hacks. We just prefer that it not be done as a pointless non sequitur.

  • The DerpRider||

    What's the word on Red Hare brewery? They are open near my office in Atlanta and I never realized how close it was. Worth taking a suitcase to pack some in to bring home?

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    I don't frequent microbrewers in ATL any longer opr various reasons.

  • The DerpRider||

    Are any of the reasons flavor?

  • Hyperion||

    No, it's because the brewers and their patrons are SoCon Christfags, who will butt rape PB on site.

  • Free Society||

    The FDA didn't approve the brews. And we all know that business owners have every incentive to poison customers at the first sign of non-regulation.

  • ||

    Leave it to Mr. Classical Liberal divert attention.

    Fuck, Palin the article is about hypocritical celebrities. Offer something on THAT.

  • Free Society||

    He's quite possibly the antithesis of a classical liberal, you know that right?

  • ||

    Yes. I know that. I'm referring to the fact he's claimed to be classical liberal in past threads.

  • mtrueman||

    "Offer something on THAT."

    Being a hypocrite is not the evil that you and Stossel believe it to be.

    Compare these hypocritical celebrities to those celebrities who DON'T speak out. Who is worse? Or, if you prefer, who is more evil? Arguably, it's those who don't speak out. A hypocrite at least knows the difference between right and wrong. One couldn't be a hypocrite otherwise.

  • ||

    Where in that comment did I say they were evil?

  • mtrueman||

    You said these celebrities were hypocrites. I was attempting to offer something on THAT.

  • mtrueman||

    "Limbaugh, Hannity, and Beck all day long.

    None of those three have any formal education."

    These are entertainers and very capable ones. A formal education is not required for what they do. I bet if you looked at their producers and script writers, on the other hand, you'd find they had far greater educational achievements.

  • Loki||

    None of those three have any formal education.

    Which three? Thomas Edison and the Wright brothers?

    Formal education isn't everything, dipshit.

  • gimmeasammich||

    If it isn't sanctioned by The State then it doesn't count. Didn't you know that from government came knowledge?

    /PB

  • Lar Gand||

    Of course we now know that having a Harvard education doesn't make a good President.

  • soflarider||

    The problem with your logic, if we can call it that, is that Beck & company got their audiences largely doing what they're doing now, and are consistently challenged, while other celebrities got their audiences largely playing fictional characters, and they are rarely if ever challenged.
    Playing Jeff Spicoli or Howard Hughes doesn't give someone (who might have otherwise been waiting tables) special insight into how the world works.

  • mr simple||

    Exactly. Entertainers and athletes are paid to be professional children, yet we're supposed to care what their opinion is on every topic. Alice Cooper said that a cople election cycles ago. Something to the effect of "if you get your opinions on politics from entertainers, then you're an idiot. We're all idiots, thet's why we went into this industry."

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    But it's effective. Entertainers have something that normal folk don't. A pulpit.

  • mtrueman||

    "The surprise to me is that..."

    Do you really find it surprising that people listen to entertainers? You obviously haven't thought deeply enough. To be a good actor, one needs to be charismatic, eloquent and persuasive. It also helps to be attractive. Education and brains are secondary. An actor is a successful actor only as far as he has the ability to focus the spotlight on himself and convince an audience.

  • Hyperion||

    No, they are economic illiterates. These are people who spend their entire life pretending in a pretend world. Which actually fits in quite well with progressive doctrine.

    OT: I know this has been discussed already, but,

    Uruguay starting a trend against the WOD?

    Uruguay is poised to legalize recreational marijuana on Tuesday, an experiment that will force the United States to reevaluate its own international drug policies divert some of their drones orginally intended for use in the middle east...

    Looks like the next foreign war we start will be with Uruguay. After all, marijuana funds terrorism, and kills little children. Amirite? Man the drones!

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    What percentage of people think pot should be legal? 58%

    The writing is on the wall on this one. Under 10 years. I should get to smoke a legal joint.

  • Hyperion||

    You can, so long as you go to CO, WA, or Uruguay. Pot will be legal everywhere on earth in 10 years, except for Maryland.

  • ||

    And Virginia.

  • some guy||

    And DC. (It's clear that the Feds don't give a shit what what the city gov't thinks about anything.)

  • AlexInCT||

    Is that because they will onlly allow crack seeing that's what their former mayor preferred?

  • ||

    Unlikely. Cigarettes will be banned within 10 years. They're certainly not going to allow pot to be legalized across the country. Plus, there's too much money in keeping it illegal, especially from the federal level.

  • Bean Counter||

    What next John? An expose on the fact that the earth is round?

  • anon||

    Wait, what? The earth is fucking round!?

    Fuck! Why didn't you cockmonglers inform me sooner!?

  • From the Tundra||

    Eratosthenes was here earlier, looking for you. Don't call him a cockmongler to his face, though, he hates that.

  • SusanM||

    market failure!

  • anon||

    Celebrities Are Economic Hypocrites When They Attack Free Markets

    Holy shit!

    May I suggest... now, bear with me here, I'm headed towards crazytown perhaps, but just hear me out...

    Water is wet?

    Mind:blown.

  • ||

    John Stossel calls out Hollywood celebrities who hate the system that made them rich

    Oh please. They don't "hate the system" at all. A lot of people think these celebrities feel guilty about being rich and mouth socialist platitudes as a way of feeling less guilty. Total bullshit. They realize that they have it great, and they just want to make sure they aren't attacked by leftists or class warfare scum, because they've seen what that's like. They've learned that actions mean nothing, only words, and if you say the right words, the class warfare scum and the grievance mongers and TEAM OUTRAGE will all stay off their backs. They're not worried about the socons at all, because they just don't have the power to make the celebrities' lives difficult.

    The rich Hollywood successes love their success, don't ever think they don't. And they want to go about their wealthy day without being hassled, because what fun is that? So they throw the bones to the people that are the only ones who are going to really hassle them: the leftists. It's like protection money to the OUTRAGE mafia, except it's the cheapest protection money anyone has ever had to pay, because it's paid in words. And they are perfectly willing to pay such a cheap price. Wouldn't you be?

  • Pro Libertate||

    It's even simpler than that. These views are the equivalent of driving a Porsche. A way to distinguish yourself from hoi polloi.

  • Bean Counter||

    Not Porsche, Lamborghini. A successful accountant can buy a Porsche. You have to be wastefully rich to buy a Lamborghini.

  • gimmeasammich||

    How wastefully rich do you have to be to have someone crash that Porche you are in into a tree?

  • Floridian||

    Brilliant! All the pieces fit. I would do the same thing these people are doing if it kept smelly hippies off my front lawn and out of my face.

  • Tman||

    That's one of the things I love about the Southpark. They went to Hollywood and instead of falling in line with THE RIGHT TEAM they skewered everyone relentlessly.

    Few writers do a better job of exposing the hypocrisy of certain celebrities better than they do.

  • Hyperion||

    Arec Barwin...

  • Free Society||

    Whatever man. Those guys are totally corporate. And the stuff they write is all corporationy.

  • Zeb||

    I remember an interview with them where they were talking about people accusing them of selling out. And they said that of course they sold out. That was the whole point, they went to Hollywood to make money.

  • John||

    I think a lot of it is that since they got rich more or less by dumb luck, they assume everyone else who is rich got there the same way. Think about it. There are a million good looking people who can deliver dialog. Moreover, anyone who is an actor or entertainer will tell you, the most talented people are not always or even usually the ones who make the most money or are the most famous. Every actor in Hollywood wakes up every day knowing there are actors doing stage plays for and waiting tables to pay the rent who are more talented than they are. They understand they are got their money by dumb luck. For this reason they are almost always the worst sorts of leftists. They assume everyone who is successful got that way like they did, through luck, and thus see no problem in stealing their ill gotten gains.

  • WTF||

    I think John nailed it on this one.

  • Hyperion||

    And he even spelled it right! Ha, I couldn't resist...

  • Mainer2||

    I was too late to point this out on the Bitcoin thread, but another good John neologism was the Russian Rubble.

  • mtrueman||

    I think John underestimates the persistance and talent necessary to succeed in any field.

  • Zeb||

    I agree. Though a lot of luck is still involved in getting to the top tier, a lot of talent and hard work is generally also necessary. I think that this is even more the case with musicians. For every big star, there are thousands of musicians out there who are at least as talented. Some of it has to do with your ability to sell yourself, but there is a lot of luck too.

  • AlexInCT||

    Meh, I thought everyone in Hollywierd slept their way to the top...

  • CE||

    Not seeing the skill that separates the stars from the supporting cast, in acting and in sports, is a common mistake. The really successful actors, singers and athletes get that way for a reason. Sure, some luck into a one-hit wonder or a big contract, but you have to have talent and work hard to stay on top for long.

  • mtrueman||

    "is a common mistake"

    Common among those who envy their success.

  • ||

    I disagree, John. There is no way Michael Bay wakes up and goes "oh man, only dumb luck got me here!" No, I guarantee he thinks "I am super rich and famous and powerful because I am an awesome director and my box office and success proves that." And to be honest, in a way he's right. I may hate his movies, but he has succeeded spectacularly, and he has every right to be proud of himself for that. I think a lot of the celebrities feel the same way. They realize luck may have been involved, but they will also feel that they would never have been able to capitalize on that luck without inherent talent and drive.

    It's pretty difficult to look at spectacular wealth and fame and go "I didn't earn any of this" if you in fact did work for it. Sure, I can see that from a trust fund baby, because they in fact didn't do anything to earn it. But anybody who went from nothing to everything is going to have some sense of pride that they actually worked for and earned that success.

  • WTF||

    Of course, they literally get paid millions to dress up and play make-believe. It's not surprising they have little sense of reality.

  • John||

    They will have some. But they will know somewhere in the back of their head that they don't deserve what they have, even if they won't admit it even to themselves.

  • From the Tundra||

    I agree with this. Lots of people work hard - only a few make it big. It's the same with these executives who write business books. They know god damn well that luck played a non-trivial part in their success. Truth doesn't make for good copy, though.

  • John||

    Look how many really successful people end up being the worst sorts of leftists. I think it is because at heart they don't think they deserve what they have and try to make up for it by advocating for policies that take from the rich.

  • Mainer2||

    That's one thing I like about Mark Cuban, he makes no apologies. In fact, he said the best thing you can do for your country is make yourself filthy rich.

  • CE||

    And he's right.

    Profit is the difference between the value to society of what you create, less the costs to society of what you used to produce that value.

    Unless you have government contracts, since the government steals their loot.

  • Skip||

    Sure they think THEY earned it and maybe some of their friends, but they think everyone else is rich and famous just due to luck.

  • wareagle||

    it may be dumb luck to land the right part, but then that part turns out to be a hit show that runs for a decade or a movie that blows up the box office. Human nature would lead most people to think they were at least partly responsible for that and, when looking at future possible jobs, it would be something that person would bring up, just like any professional would point to resume highlights.

  • Logical 1||

    Well said Episiarch - I think your comments sum it up exactly

  • CE||

    Hmmmm... actors, acting.... who would have thought?

  • Bill Dalasio||

    This is about right. Honestly, I doubt most people in Hollywood have spent enough time thinking about economics to hate the system or capitalism. On the other hand, I doubt most of them have as systematic a plan as you suggest. It's just that gentry liberalism is, well, a status symbol. It shows you're rich enough "not to be like all the money grubbers".

  • mtrueman||

    "except it's the cheapest protection money anyone has ever had to pay, because it's paid in words. And they are perfectly willing to pay such a cheap price. Wouldn't you be?"

    What you are trying to say, in a word, is that 'they' are cynics. Wouldn't I be? No, because I'm not a cynic. Are you?

  • Volren||

    I can actually buy this. I mean is Harrison Ford really so disconnected/stupid he doesn't realize comparing razing jungles to waxing his chest hair is just dumb?

    Maybe it's just me giving them the benefit of the doubt though. There are plenty of poor people who believe the same drivel.

  • tarran||

    My god! and libertarians are hypocrites for driving on government roads to deliver lectures about the evils of government controlling infrastructure!

    Oh wow! We must be wrong too!

  • Ron||

    Roads and railroads were being built by private groups before the government took the job away from those groups. In the town I live in most of the roads, though dirt or wood at the time, were built before California became a state.

  • sarcasmic||

    Government is the guy who sees a parade going by, then shamelessly runs to the front to pretend like he was leading it the whole time.

  • some guy||

    ...after spending the last few weeks doing his best to stop the parade from happening.

  • Loki||

    Government is the guy who sees a parade going by, then shamelessly runs to the front to pretend like he was leading it the whole time.

    With the end result typically resembling that scene in Animal House where the marching band is lead down a dead end alley and gets stuck. Couldn't find a clip, but I'm sure everyone knows the scene I'm talking about.

  • Sevo||

    ..."I'm amazed they're not embarrassed by what they say."...
    I'm not. There has to be some self-awareness to feel shame.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    Have I mentioned I like Stossel?

  • Matrix||

  • BSubversive.com||

    I have a hard time enjoying movies staring spoiled, progtard hypocrites so I don't go to the movies. It's one of the benefits of being a normal person.

  • CE||

    An actor's political views don't bother me at all, so I enjoy watching movies.

    I'm used to laughing at the political beliefs of 98% of the world though.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    “Hillary does excite me, in the same way the potent symbolism of the first African American president was what thrilled people about Obama,” he said. “It’s similar with Hillary and gender equality.

    Learned...NOTHING!

  • ||

    To be fair, I have a hard time watching a movie with Ben Affleck in it. Though that has nothing to do with his politics.

  • ||

    MATT DAMON?

  • Rhywun||

    “Hillary does excite me, in the same way the potent symbolism of the first African American president was what thrilled people about Obama,”

    My god what a galactic idiot.

  • Leigh||

    Must be that tingle he feels when he hears her speak. For me, I can't turn push mute button fast enough.

  • ||

    “Hillary does excite me, in the same way the potent symbolism of the first African American president was what thrilled people about Obama,”

    Potent symbolism. You know, the important stuff.

  • alittlesense||

    Dimwit with an ego the size of Cleveland says something dumb. In other news, sun rises.

  • hotsy totsy||

    Affleck said at times he felt like a “prop” being used to help candidates raise money through donations.

    It slowly begins to dawn on him.....

  • some guy||

    If I had trouble listening to music by people with idiotic opinions I'd have missed damn near all of the rock movement. And that would suck. Frankly, I don't care what the artist's political opinions are, so long as those opinions don't make it into the lyrics. Same goes with movies, actors and dialogue/theme.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    Hollywood reporters want access to celebrities politicians, and posing uncomfortable questions reduces that access.

  • Black Liberty Unchained||

    P Diddy cares about global warming because he turns off the lights of he giant mansions!

    Are the left that retarded to think that celebs really give a shit about global warming? I've never seen progs call out celebs for not practicing what they preach.

  • Black Liberty Unchained||

    Edit *his*

  • The Other Kevin||

    I think it's just a matter of celebrities being insulated from, and completely out of touch with, the rest of the world. I've read a lot of biographies lately, and you will see this in athletes, musicians, pretty much anybody famous. I would include politicians in the list. They just exist in their own little echo chamber full of people who think the way they do. They never come in contact with people who get paid by the hour, or start a business.

    Most of them don't even manage their own finances - they pay somebody else do it. Do you think Bon Jovi is fretting about his tax rate? I'm sure he's got an accountant who handles his taxes, and just says "sign here" once a year.

  • Volren||

    They never come in contact with people who get paid by the hour, or start a business.

    Sure they do, it's just that the mix of starstruck fame + customer service training means those people spend the whole time saying things like "Yes sir, of course sir, coming right up".

    Small wonder they start thinking they're more important than they are.

  • Gilbert Martin||

    "Actor/comedian Russell Brand told the BBC he wants "a socialist, egalitarian system based on the massive redistribution of wealth."

    Yeah?

    You first.

    Let's see Brand massively redistribute HIS wealth to the extent that he has to live in a homeless shelter.

  • John||

    Eddie Vetter was a huge supporter of Nader in 2000. Of course no reporter asked him. But someone should have asked him that since Nader supported a 100% tax on all income over $250,000 a year, if had Nader won, did Vetter plan to pay that or leave for tax exile? And if Vetter supports that, does he currently give away all of his income over $250,000 and if not why not?

  • Zeb||

    I really can't believe that even Nader took that proposal seriously. Though it would be fun to hear a rich supporter try to answer that question.

  • Mokers||

    EXACTLY.

    I wish somebody would ask what ACA plan they signed up for. After all, the more healthy people on the exchange, the better for everybody, right?

    Or even better, ask actors to sign a pledge that they won't work on any production that doesn't provide health insurance for every member of the crew, right down to the people who clean up after craft services.

    Then you can have singers sign a pledge that they will provide insurance for everybody who helps in that production.

    Could you imagine "Ben, you were paid 10 million on your last movie. did you know that if you were paid only 9.5 million, the difference would have covered the healthcare premiums for all members of the crew? "

  • ||

    Well, I remember reading on this critical thinking blog the professor (who once mocked Gillespie) arguing what Stossel is doing here is a "logical fallacy." Mind you, he picks on conservatives and links to the most liberal of sites - eg Mediamatters, Thinkprogress - and pretty much doesn't bother with the nutcases on the left who do nothing but break logical fallacy laws.

    Anyway, I still can't see how this is not a valid argument. If you call for lower taxes, then lead by example and pay more. If you want more redistribution as a means to make things "equal" then have the dignity to do it yourself. No one is stopping you. Why do you need the government to do this?

    Celebrities who call for government social engineering and tinkering and still sing as if it's 1929 but have immense wealth shouldn't be taken very seriously. I love Springsteen but his political support of Obama is grating. It insults some of his fan base.

    Anyway. I mentioned this in the past and I think it's worth noting again: I have a couple of high-income friends who think Che is a freedom fighter. One of them sickeningly wears that stupid t-shirt while driving around in a Jag. When I always ask why in the world they would support a murderous thug who would kill and steal what they've earned I never get a substantial answer or if I do, I get some romantic intellectual drivel and diarrhea.

  • Bean Counter||

    "If you call for lower taxes, then lead by example and pay more."
    I assume you meant HIGHER taxes?

  • ||

    Yes, shit. Sorry.

  • Loki||

    Hooray for Carey and Vaughn. Maybe they'll convince their colleagues.

    More likely their careers are over.

  • CE||

    Good article, except for calling it a "tax dodge gimmick" when someone complies with the law.

    It's nice that Obama supporter Bon Jovi has a foundation that builds houses for poor people, but at tax time, the musician labels himself a "farmer." He pays only $100 in state property tax. And his tax dodge gimmick: raising honeybees.

    Bruce Springsteen sings about factories closing down but pays little tax on the hundreds of acres of land he owns. His dodge: An organic farmer works his land.

    Instead of calling them "tax dodges" or "tax gimmick" or "loopholes", think of them as "remaining freedoms". The less money the government gets, the better. Sure the people who think the government ought to take more are hypocrites when they try to legally reduce their own taxes, but don't smear the tactic.

  • ||

    Except, "tax dodge" is how it viewed through their paradigm. For people that talk about taxpaying as patriotic expression, finding ways out of doing so would be a "tax dodge".

  • Bill Dalasio||

    Meh, yes and no. I do see your point. But, how many of those tax conditions are artificial? That is to say, they were created by political expediency rather than any rational basis in fact? I fail to see how it is expanding freedom if I insist that there should be a law raising everyone's taxes 25% except for people whose last name ends in "-io", who should be exempt from all taxes.

  • On The Road To Mandalay||

    These people are no different than the majority of human beings on the face of this stupid planet we live on. What people say, what they do, and what they think are almost always three totally different things. Also, most people can juggle from three to five entirely different thoughts and ideas in their heads simultaneously and believe in all of them simultaneously. And when anyone who is poor becomes rich they say the same crap.

  • mtrueman||

    "tax dodge" is how it viewed through their paradigm"

    I very much doubt that folks like Bruce Springsteen do their own taxes. They probably hire accounts for that, and like it or not, to be an accountant is to be a professional tax dodger.

  • Black Liberty Unchained||

    I get it Bruce Springsteen is an innocent bystander lead astray by evil tax accountants! I'm sure he has no interest in lowering his tax burden. Well no worries he can write out a very large check to government almighty to atone for his sins!

  • mtrueman||

    "I get it Bruce Springsteen is an innocent bystander"

    I agree that Bruce is innocent, but hardly a bystander. His accountant is his employee and Bruce is ultimately responsible for his actions which are essentially aimed at lowering his tax burden. I don't think tax accountants are evil. Neither is lowering one's tax burden. You may disagree with the work of accountants, but Bruce is hardly alone in employing them.

  • Ross Adams||

    You think Harrison Ford will be phased by tough political questions? Nah, you need this guy to truly shake his world to its core.

  • angus||

    They get lots of $billions in subsidies from the state and pay virtually no tax.

    They are socialists, they aren't hypocrites.

  • Skip||

    Its a sad day when the "Making Copies" guy has more real world knowledge than all the A-List of Hollywood.

  • Anvil||

    It certainly is good to know that at least Rob Schneider has "seen the light"

  • Santa.Claus||

  • Stephdumas||

    The way they act reminds me of that book written by Peter Schweizer
    "Do as I said (Not as I do)".

  • Anvil||

    Becoming a celebrity should require passing basic courses in Economics and the Constitution

  • LIFE.time.opertunity||

  • ibcbet||

    lbs of roasted green chiles of the long john variety at a spice level you enjoy.
    We call it Caldillo or Green Chile Stew.

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