A '9/11 For Schools?' Let's Hope Not

A decade of frantic overreaction and wasteful, destructive policies based on the false promise of perfect safety

"It's going to change the way we look at things," a security consultant told Fox's Megyn Kelly on the day of the Newtown elementary school massacre. America's schools will need armed guards, "perimeter security, CCTV, preventative issues with the school psychiatrist [and] police department ... " Newtown, he summed up, "is going to be for schools what 9/11 was for airports."

Let's hope not. If the reaction to the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School is anything like the reaction to Sept. 11, we're in for a decade or more of frantic overreaction and wasteful, destructive policies based on the false promise of perfect safety.

It's only natural that parents hugged their kids tighter this weekend, and sent them off to school on Monday with more anxiety than usual. So it ought to be comforting to learn, as Daniel Gardner points out in his terrific 2008 book "The Science of Fear," "kids are far safer inside school walls than outside." The evidence compiled in the federal government's annual survey, Indicators of School Crime and Safety, consistently shows that "a student's risk of being murdered in school was de minimis—so tiny it was effectively zero."

The latest edition (2011) of that report notes that "over all available survey years, the percentage of youth homicides occurring at school remained at less than 2 percent of the total number of youth homicides." In terms of child fatalities, both the backyard pool and the family car are far more dangerous than the classroom.

In 2010, the journal Education Researcher put the problem in perspective with an article called "What Can Be Done About School Shootings? A Review of the Evidence." Per the authors' back of the envelope calculation, "any given school can expect to experience a student homicide about once every 6,000 years."

Students' risk of suffering from panic-fueled policy choices is considerably greater. As Gardner notes, after the Columbine massacre, "zero tolerance" policies proliferated and "the term 'lockdown' moved from prison jargon to standard English as it became common to conduct drills in which students imagined armed maniacs in the halls. Money shifted from books and maintenance to metal detectors, cameras, and guards."

There may be worse to come. On Sunday, Matt Drudge—always quick to highlight the latest Transportation Security Administration atrocity—charged that the "Obama administration let school security funds lapse." Apparently, we need more federal funding to armor up our schools, despite the vanishingly small risk. This sort of political point-scoring is an excellent way to transform public education into a 12-year shuffle through a giant TSA security line. But the resulting environment is no way to raise independent, free-thinking citizens.

That same evening, The Washington Post's left-leaning "Wonkblog" ran a feature asking, "What would 'meaningful action' on gun control look like?" From Wonkblog's account, it looks like a Brady Campaign wish list—background checks, a renewed assault weapons ban, waiting periods—no item of which would have prevented Adam Lanza's killing spree.

The American Conservative's Alan Jacobs argues that "the same warning against implementing policy decisions based on vivid, but very unlikely events applies to the people who are claiming that the answer to school massacres is arming our teachers" Jacobs predicts that "within a few years more people would be killed by teachers who fired their weapons accidentally or in misplaced anger or fear, or by students who stole their teachers' guns, than have ever been killed in school massacres."

Of course, the horror of Newtown will "change the way we look at things." But we shouldn't let it change our ability to assess risk—and to think before we legislate.

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  • John||

    Oh for fuck's sake.

  • ||

    Well, obviously, the objective is 9/11 for everything. Because it gives the government more control, which is all it really wants anyway.

  • ||

    Spottswoode: From what I.N.T.E.L.L.I.G.N.C.E has gathered, it would be 9/11 times 100.
    Gary Johnston: 9/11 times a hundred? Jesus, that's...
    Spottswoode: Yes, 91,100.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Well, obviously, the objective is 9/11 for everything. Because it gives the government more control, which is all it really wants anyway.

    This.

    The real purpose of ALL legislation is to expand the size and role of government. All one need ask himself when looking at a piece of new law is "How does this legislation expand the size and scope of government?" and he will find the true motivations behind it.

  • ||

    Read and weep, gun fetishizing numnutzes.

    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/re.....index.html

  • Government Hack||

    I feel a tear coming on...oh wait, that's just a speck of sawdust.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Yup, because nudie scans and strip searches of schools kids by government drones couldn't possibly go wrong.

  • nicole||

    They can't. SCOTUS told me so. Because children have no rights.

  • BakedPenguin||

    "We'll find that Advil eventually!"

  • nicole||

    And when we do, your punishment is...being kicked out of prison for a week!

  • Another David||

    And potentially executed.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    http://blog.al.com/spotnews/20.....rt_m-rpt-1

    Just putting at a police officer in every Alabama school is going to cost taxpayers $122 million. I wouldn't mind this, even though I think it's unneeded. But I suspect just putting a police officer in every school is just the beginning.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    Note: I wouldn't mind the presence of cops. I DO mind the price tag.

  • Certified Public Asskicker||

    As I suggested in the AM links, if we fired one or two of the 7 Vice Principals we might be able to swing this.

  • Killazontherun||

    Or, fire four and retrain two to be security guards.

  • Tonio||

    Absolutely not, Killaz. Vice principals are the disciplinarians in most schools, so basically you're going to take humorless bullies and give them badges, guns and more authoritay.

    Are you trying to grease up that slippery slope?

  • Zeb||

    I mind the presence of cops at schools. Fuck that.

  • DGPFL||

    Yes. When you put a cop in school what are they going to do all day? Other than find bullshit excuses to search, bully and handcuff kids?!

    I remember a friend telling me a story a few years back about a kid at the neighborhood high school being handcuffed and held in custody at the school for "talking back" to a cop who told her to put her cell phone away. WTF - talking back is a criminal offense now - what happened to the 1st Amendment?

  • ΘJΘʃ de águila||

    "contempt of cop"

    Smash her face and take her away.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    I absolutely mind the presence of cops. How long until mission creep sets in? How long until they start shooting kids because of a furtive movement?

    The thought that we can stamp out crazy with ANY kind of legislation is simply, well, crazy.

  • Marshall Gill||

    I am re-reading Bastiat's Essays on Political Economy and am astounded at how often he correctly attacks "universal education". Right along with "progressive taxation" he has no problem defining these as immoral, literally "legal plunder", something that many Americans, including a surprising number of libertarians, do not or can not do.

    I mind even $5 to socialist indoctrination. $122M more is putrid.

  • Killazontherun||

    How about this from William Graham Sumner,

    For three hundred years our history has been marked by the alternations of ‘prosperity’ and ‘distress’ which are produced by the booms and their collapses. When the collapse comes, the people who are left long on goods and land [and stocks] always make a great outcry and start a political agitation. Their favorite device always is to try to inflate the currency and raise prices again until they can unload…No scheme which has ever been devised by them has ever made a collapsed boom go up again.

  • AlmightyJB||

    Not sure if they still do this but my junior and senior year of high school (80-81) they had a sheriff there full time. Mostly he just patrolled the parking lot. We still managed to go out to our cars during study hall and get high. I don't really remember why that started. Of course I don't remember much from that time due to all the quaaludes. They did random locker searches all the time as well. They had talked about putting in metal detectors but that didn't happen.

  • Redmanfms||

    I don't really remember why that started.

    Probably had something (well, everything) to do with this:

    We still managed to go out to our cars during study hall and get high.
  • RPR2||

    if only there were a way to teach and disseminate information that didn't involve grouping them together in a bricks and mortar building.

  • NoVAHockey||

    that and integrate kids into society at large. there's no reason you couldn't put a few classrooms in my office building. or something like that.

  • Certified Public Asskicker||

    Serious question, is there a decent online alternative at this point? I know about Khan, but is that really a viable comprehensive education tool?

  • BakedPenguin||

  • BakedPenguin||

    Sorry, that was to your first question. There are apparently several k-12 online schools.

    I read about one (public school!) teacher who used Khan. She flipped the traditional method - her kids' homework was watching a couple videos, and they did problems when they came to school the next day. That way, she was able to help them in real time.

  • Marshall Gill||

    Khan is free. There are many other resources available, some quite extensive, some fairly expensive.

  • UnionBuiltOhioRoads||

    Are you asking about learning aids or a full-time curriculum based k-12 school?

    I'm about to graduate from an online school, so I know a little about this topic.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    http://blog.al.com/breaking/20.....ion_f.html

    Alabama student faces expulsion for having an unloaded shotgun in his car. This is rural Arab, Alabama, folks. I think you'd expect a teenage boy to have a hunting weapon in his car.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    "It's a very unfortunate occurrence," [the principle] said. "He is a valued member of our student body, as all students are. At the same time, laws are clear: Guns cannot be brought on public school campuses."
  • An0nB0t||

    Bureaucracies 1, small-r reason 0.

  • Grenator Bole||

    Laws are laws, ya know.

  • entropy||

    Are rural Arabs less likely than urban Arabs to be of terrorist descent?

    Answer: No. Everyone is a potential terrorist.

  • John||

    The problem is that schools are a very soft target. And they have a huge impact. If you are some terrorist looking to make the infidel pay and live in terror or just some mal adjusted freak who wants to take revenge on the world, a grade school is a hell of a nice target. Terrorists have struck grade schools in Israel and in Russia. It makes sense they will eventually in the US. And it will be a real shit sandwich. But I don't see how it is practical to secure every school to withstand an assault by SEAL TEAM 6, which is what it would take to prevent a determined and suicidal attacker or group of attackers.

    Yeah life sucks.

  • sarcasmic||

    It ain't practical, no. But if you look at it from the point of view of the statists, what better way to usher in a totalitarian police state than to normalize children showing their papers to an armed agent of the state every day?

  • John||

    If people were not completely fucking stupid and incapable of making a reasonable decision, you might do a few things. But the problem is that the risk isn't the students, it is from people form the outside. Of course people being what they are, they will use that risk as an excuse to treat every student like a criminal and make every school into a maximum security prison.

  • sarcasmic||

    they will use that risk as an excuse to treat every student like a criminal

    Well, yeah. Everyone must be treated equally. So if there is a chance that someone is a potential criminal, in fairness everyone must be treated like one.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    I'm pretty sure that it says in the school policy that University of Alabama students can face disciplinary charges for failing to show proper identification to campus police.

  • Zeb||

    I am so glad that the security where I went to college were not police.

  • nicole||

    And here we thought that's what government schools were already set up for.

  • A Secret Band of Robbers||

    Articles like this make it difficult for me to imagine sending my kids to a private school. The ratchet isn't going to get any looser, folks.

  • The_Choctaw||

    I just thought it was a way to provide education to all citizens, regardless of class! See before public education, if your parents didn't have enough disposable income for your schooling, you would be disadvantaged for life versus the kids of rich kids and-- wait, what? Government brainwashing centers? Oh, ok. I need to be more pathologically cynical to play on team L.

  • ||

    Shorter Casino Hustler: "Life's not faaaiiiirrrr"

  • tarran||

    This is why the arming teachers argument also is a bit silly (for the record, I think whether teachers go armed or not should be up to each school to decide or individual teachers if the school is indifferent).

    I think Timothy McVeigh's bombing of the Federal Building fits the profile of the spree killing described by that sociological essay Groovus linked to.

    McVeigh wanted to attack something that was the symbol of the enemy (to him). But, because they had armed guards, and armed people inside, he simply rented a truck, filled it with the fertilizer bomb he constructed in lieu of amassing a secret arsenal, and conducted his symbolic attack in that way.

    There literally is no magic policy that will reduce these incidents much lower than we now have. In fact, I wonder if the policies are conterproductive, because the impersonal rules based treatment of non-normals fuels greater resentment.

  • ||

    Gun-free zones invite trouble, however unlikely that trouble may be.

  • tarran||

    Gun-free zones invite trouble, however unlikely that trouble may be.

    Oh, I completely agree. My point is that there really is no panacea to prevent it. With that being said, if my one of the principals of the schools my kids attend said that she was going to have a couple of shotguns locked in a cabinet in her office and train the staff on how to use them, I would find that comforting.

    My fellow suburban massholes would panic at the thought and pull their kids immediately. Despite the fact we had a non-custodial relative kidnap - using force(!) - a child from the parking lot of the middle school last year using force. People pretended *that* didn't happen because her family had moved from a crime-ridden section of Boston, so it wasn't a threat to the children from my upper-crust town but to the subhuman savages that progressivism is supposed to tame.

  • Invisible Finger||

    My fellow suburban massholes would panic at the thought and pull their kids immediately.

    Again, no downside so far.

  • tommy0302||

    Well said tarran, now that peanut butter & fluff sandwiches have been removed from our schools we need to find the next thing for our children to be worried about. Think of the children dammit!

  • ||

    That's why convents are always being targeted.
    Cripes you dickless gun-fetishists are a piece of work.
    No wonder libertarians get laughed at.
    Buy a box of Extenz to alleviate your shortcomings.

  • sarcasmic||

    Deliberately arming teachers is silly, I agree.

    However there is a difference between outright arming them, and allowing teachers (and anyone else) with a permit to carry just like they can most anyplace else.

    There is a reason why these people target gun free zones.

  • ||

    Yah, because they're cowards.
    Libertarians: Govt bad, so don't slap on more govt. Good so far.
    Dicless Gun fetishists: Gun violence bad, so layer on more guns.
    Fkn retards.
    The world is laughing at you, Amerrrika.

  • Jordan||

    In other words we can expect society to go full retard and severely curtail the rights of innocent people in response to a vanishingly small risk. Sigh.

  • R C Dean||

    Its who we are. Its how we roll.

  • fried wylie||

    Statists gonna state...

  • ||

    Gun Fetishists gotta fap.

  • Loki||

    In other words we can expect society to go full retard...

    Go? You mean we weren't there before? *shudder*

  • fried wylie||

    Not there yet, due to people who wont STOP RESISTING *tase* *beat* *tase* *stomp* *tase* *nightstick rape* *tase*

  • sarcasmic||

    I wonder what the reaction would be if someone illegally carrying a firearm in a school for personal protection nipped a mass killing in the bud.

    I'm sure they would make an example out of our hero by sending him to prison for a very long time.

  • John||

    They would just ignore it and pretend it didn't happen. Someone carrying a legal firearm stopped a mass shooter at the Appalachian Law School or wherever it was and the media just didn't cover it.

    You have to remember, people defending themselves with weapons doesn't fit the narrative and therefore does not happen.

  • NeonCat||

    I'm sure it didn't help that the ALS is in a very rural area unlike Newtown, which is relatively close to media-rich (or is it -ridden?) NYC.

  • Gray Ghost||

    You have to remember, people defending themselves with weapons doesn't fit the narrative and therefore does not happen.


    Related to that point, I haven't heard anything further in the media about that link you all posted yesterday about the Clackamas shooter being deterred by a CHL holder.

  • ||

    That's how far this republic has fallen. May lightning strike these fucking slavers.

  • A Secret Band of Robbers||

    First day: "Illegal shooting at school; one shooter dead, other in custody"

    Second day: nothing.

  • An0nB0t||

    That which is seen, and that which is unseen.

  • Steve G||

    Kind of difficult to prove a mass killing was avoided. Unless the 20-something-white-loner was covered in high capabity mags and improvised bombs.

  • ||

    The real world is not a Dirty Harry movie, or the OK Corral.
    Get your heads out of your asses, you dickless gun fetishists.

  • Brian D||

    When only criminals have weapons, we'll be safe.

  • ||

    "Single acts of tyranny may be ascribed to the accidental opinion of the day; but a series of oppressions, begun at a distinguished period, and pursued unalterably through every change of ministers, too plainly proves a deliberate, systematic plan of reducing us to slavery."

    Mental defective commits mass-murder; hoplophobic prohibitionists exploit the reactions to the massacre in the pursuit of their despotic designs upon the country; rinse, repeat, rinse, repeat, rinse, repeat, rinse, and repeat.

    Sounds like a plan of reducing us to slavery.

  • sarcasmic||

    Slavery has been the default state of man for most of history.

    There's no reason to think that this little blip of liberty is an aberration that will soon be corrected.

  • sarcasmic||

    *isn't*

  • Cliché Bandit||

    when i have the energy i would like to debate this point.

  • The_Choctaw||

    There's a certain slavery in every public place having the potential to turn into a fucking bloodbath because everyone has a "well the second amendment and government is powerless to stop crazy people..." attitude, too. Living in America you're just used to it.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    That bootlicking retard Scarboro dredged up the despicable 9/11 analogy this morning. You remember: after 9/11, we had a grown up reassessment of what freedom means, and decided a little intrusion by the TSA is better than thousands of flaming airplanes falling out of the sky.

    Right? And all those crackpot libertarians who called the ATF a bunch of jackbooted thugs, just because they murdered Randy Weaver's kid? They're just a bunch of tantrum-throwing juvenile delinquents!

    But the adults are in charge of the country now, and a tidal wave of hysterical legislative kneejerkery is exactly what we need to get the healing process into overdrive!

    FORWARD, LEMMINGS!

  • John||

    Have some liberal salty tears Brooks. Can the NRA ever be defeated???

    http://www.slate.com/articles/.....ssful.html

  • nicole||

    If you are a gun-control advocate, the news regularly brings you what every reform movement wants: a powerful anecdote demonstrating the urgency of your cause, in the form of a mass shooting of innocents.

    Holy shit, what fuckers.

  • John||

    Dead children, just what every reform movement needs. Bayzelon is really a horrible person.

  • Loki||

    Gotta love it when their mask slips. 20 dead children = leverage. "Fuckers" isn't a strong enough word. I'm not sure one exists.

  • NoVAHockey||

    "Maybe we need to shift from fighting over rights to appealing to the communal good"

    my response: go fuck yourself.

  • nicole||

    You'd think they would know better than to use phrases like "collective sacrifice," but I guess that just shows how little they know their enemy.

  • NoVAHockey||

    it's funny. that word just jumped off the page for me.

  • nicole||

    I'm having a moment of hysterical laughter here. They think "give up your guns" won't work, but "give up your guns for the collective" will. !!!

  • AlmightyJB||

    What if I owned guns "for the collective". Is that ok?

  • mad libertarian guy||

    I do.

    I take the "militia" part of the 2A pretty seriously. Not that I think I'll ever need to be called upon, but if I were, for whatever reason, not only will I be using those guns as a means of self defense, but as a means to preserve the collective.

  • John||

    Just in case you haven't barfed enough over this

    But that answer isn’t translating into public safety. Maybe we need to shift from fighting over rights to appealing to the communal good. If you are the law-abiding owners of a semi-automatic, Adam Lanza’s horrible act isn’t your fault, and your desire to protect yourself and your family is probably heartfelt. But if you shared in a collective sacrifice of your preferred type of weapon, you could help make it just a little bit harder for the next young man experiencing a dangerous psychotic breakdown to go on a shooting rampage.

    And the thing is, it’s hard to see how that could happen without your sacrifice. Lanza got his guns from his mother, who owned five of them and took her sons target shooting. They lived in a town with a strong gun culture—strong enough to torpedo a police-led effort earlier this year to curb the shooting of assault weapons at unlicensed guns ranges.

    You have to sacrifice for the common good Brooks.

  • nicole||

    I didn't even get that far. What fuckers!

  • $park¥||

    They lived in a town with a strong gun culture—strong enough to torpedo a police-led effort earlier this year to curb the shooting of assault weapons at unlicensed guns ranges.

    Somebody should tell them that guns don't fire torpedoes.

  • AlmightyJB||

    "They lived in a town with a strong gun culture—strong enough to torpedo a police-led effort earlier this year to curb the shooting of assault weapons at unlicensed guns ranges."

    huh? were my panties supposed to bunch up over that?

  • Zeb||

    So in other words the town got annoyed that the police were telling them they couldn't shoot down at the sand pit?

  • NeonCat||

    My preferred weapon is a GAU-8A Avenger. I don't own one, unfortunately, is that good enough for the collective?

  • ant1sthenes||

    It's your duty to make it a little easier for the next sane but evil young man to go on a home invasion killing spree.

  • Loki||

    Basically, yes. It's your duty to die for the collective. "The needs of the many outweigh blah blah blah, insert collectivist horseshit here". And if someone does invade your home the proper response is to call the police and hide in a closet hoping they get there before you're killed. And then when they do get there, that they don't finish the job for the home invader.

  • fried wylie||

    When did people start living according to Star Trek axioms?

    Hey Spock, and by extension all Vulcans, thanks a bunch for spreading your collectivist bullshit to a whole generation of poorly parented hippy-crochfruit. Go fuckyourselves, on your next available 7-year fuck-timeslot.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    Uhh to be fair, Spock ended up (with Kirk's help) being an individualist and reversing the phrase.

  • fried wylie||

    Any progress in that direction was lost over the ensuing century.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    ohh and "crotchfruit" is now purloined.
    thanks

  • Redmanfms||

    collective sacrifice

    You know who else believed in collective sacrifice?

  • Loki||

    Newtown, he summed up, "is going to be for schools what 9/11 was for airports."

    *barf*

    ...the resulting environment is no way to raise independent, free-thinking citizens.

    Feature, not bug.

    But we shouldn't let it change our ability to assess risk—and to think before we legislate.

    What ability to assess risk? As for thinking before they legislate: BWAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!1!!! When has that ever happened?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    You have to sacrifice for the common good Brooks.

    You know what? Fuck the "common good".

    Of my "more than ten but less that fifty" handguns, most are single stacks. But I do have three (two of which were specifically made for the police/military market, strangely enough) which are designed for a magazine which holds more than the magical tenth round, which is apparently what designates them as tools of wholesale slaughter.

    I have no intention of surrendering them to anybody from the government.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    I have no intention of surrendering them to anybody from the government.

    That fills Lon Horiuchi with glee....

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Maybe he'll be filled with something else next time, instead.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    I thought he had a nervous breakdown after Wako...i hold no sympathy for him if that is the case.

  • Killazontherun||

    Standard Alex Jones is a nut (and a ham!) disclaimer but this is just too rich:

    Facebook Suspends Account For Questioning Official Narrative on Shooting

    http://www.infowars.com/facebo.....-shooting/

    In September 2011, Infowars reporter Darrin McBreen was told by Facebook staff not to voice his political opinion on the social networking website.

    Responding to comments McBreen had made about off-grid preppers being treated as criminals, the “Facebook Team” wrote, “Be careful making about making political statements on facebook,” adding, “Facebook is about building relationships not a platform for your political viewpoint. Don’t antagonize your base. Be careful and congnizat (sic) of what you are preaching.”

  • Steve G||

    OMG, was teh "Facebook Team" actually looking on FB before the election???

  • Tonio||

    Facebook is...not a platform for your political viewpoint.

    Bullshit. There are several people I know on FB and all they post (that I can see, anyway) is screeds for moveon dot org, Americans against the Tea Party, etc. FB is a platform for approved political viewpoints, but not for others.

    FB is a private entity and can set whatever terms of service it wishes, but the hypocrisy is blatant.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    Hey, what does 9/11 and Sandy Hook have in common?

    According to Iran's state media, both were done by the JOOOZ!!!

    (Seriously.)

  • BakedPenguin||

    Well, duh.

    Tell us what you know, HM...

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    I know my Educational Psychology class was taught by a Lizard Person.

    He...never....blinked!

  • BakedPenguin||

    You know, some of us can't help that we were born with nictitating membranes. Don't be so othering.

  • Tonio||

    That was a pod person, HM, not a Reptilian. Do keep up.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    wait, where do the Grays come in?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    They think "give up your guns" won't work, but "give up your guns for the collective" will. !!!

    But the Collective is Teh Children! What sort of depraved sociopath wouldn't give up his icky scary guns to save the life of a precocious little urchin?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    In his sober, sad speech in Newtown, Conn. Sunday night, President Obama sounded like he meant it when he promised to address gun violence.

    Wow.

    He sounded like he meant it when he said a bunch of other stuff, too. How are we coming along on those projects?

  • Hugh Akston||

    We need 24-hour a day teachers. Teachers that don't need to eat or sleep. Teachers with superior firepower, and the reflexes to use it.

  • Steve G||

    After seeing pics of this kid, I'm really surprised there weren't any Flight 93 moments in this scenario. I mean I think a strong breeze coulda knocked this dweeb over.

  • NoVAHockey||

    that's why it was an elementary school and not a high school.

  • Loki||

    You'd think maybe one of the teachers or other staff would have tried to do something though. Afterall, we're constantly being led to believe that teachers are so noble and selfless. I guess now we know where the line is on their alleged selflessness.

  • Tonio||

    The news report I heard on NPR during drivetime this AM said that the principal was killed after confronting Lanza.

    Also, what NoVa said.

  • AlmightyJB||

    I think most of them will be volunteering to man the xray porno scanners.

  • DGPFL||

    ROBOTEACHER

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Teachers that don't need to eat or sleep. Teachers with superior firepower, and the reflexes to use it.

    "Ladies and Gentlemen, allow me to introduce... ROBOTEECH!"

  • Loki||

    At first I read that as "ROBOTECH" and was thinking "Holy shit, yes! Fuck armed cops, Valkyrie fighters at every school!" Oh well.

  • ||

    " In terms of child fatalities, both the backyard pool and the family car are far more dangerous than the classroom."
    I think individuals and families are a little more willing to accept death at the hands of inanimate objects rather than other individuals actually trying to violently take your life.. Not that I'm in agreement with the gun control assholes on this.

  • Drax||

    move to eliminate deadly guns be wil USA's next great social movement.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    move to eliminate deadly guns be wil USA's next great social movement.

    And one of its most deadly.

  • ||

    If you're lucky.
    Or you could just remain an over-armed country where the women have sense and the men are dickless.
    Either or.

  • fried wylie||

    Alternate product names: Cyberprof, Edudroid, Smartbot

    Specifications:
    * 256 Teraflop processing cluster, 64GB of Ram per node
    * 16EB solidstate storage, for offline access to educational resources
    * WiFi, 4G, and Bluetooth
    * Choice of Windows Server 2020 or RHEL 17
    * Choice of Skins: Chromolly Steel, Aviation-Grade Aluminum/Titanium Alloy, Carbon/Expoxy Composite, or Adamantium
    * Contact your local distributor to discuss armament options ranging from kinetic penetrators, RPGs and lasers to chemical, biological, and radiological devices.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    "Windows Server"

    FUCKING SHIT! You really want to make them as useless as real teachers don't you. You go right ahead with your HP teacher, I will have an open source Linux ode thank you. ( or a smoking hot Apple model)

  • Alice Bowie||

    Nobody is a Libertarian when their child lays DEAD in a school due to a "law abiding gun owner" flipping out.

    Expecting gun owners to take personal responsibility is unreasonable. In this case, a "law abiding machine gun owner" didn't take into account that her retarded son would take her machine gun, murder her, and 27 other people. We can't even hold the murder responsible as he killed himself before the police showed up.

    But it's easy to be a LIBERTARIAN and say we should all be free to possess nuclear weapons...when it's not OUR children laid-out dead.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    uhhh.... ROADZ!?!?!

  • ||

    Uhhh, Dickless gun Fetishist.

  • Redmanfms||

    It wasn't a machine gun you ignorant cow.

  • crazyfingers||

    Hey look, a moron!

  • Loki||

    Expecting gun owners to take personal responsibility is unreasonable.

    Newsflash: most gun owners are responsible. This kind of shit is an abberation, not the norm.

    In this case, a "law abiding machine gun owner"...

    Oh my fucking God! A semi-automatic (which is what all of the guns used in this crime were) is not the same thing as a "machine gun". A semi-auto means that if you pull the trigger a single bullet fires, and if you want to fire again you have to release the trigger and pull it again. That is not the same thing as what is commonly understood to be a "machine gun", which is a full automatic, meaning that if you pull the trigger and hold it down the gun continues to fire round after round until you either let up or run out of ammo (fully automatic guns are already illegal in CT and most other states as well as under federal law). Also, a machine gun is usually thought of as a large caliber weapon mounted on a vehicle or used on a tripod for bunker defense, although there are fully automatic assault rifles (again, already illegal). Try learning something about guns before spouting off about how "GUNZ R TEH BAD EVUL AND STUFF" Or better yet, just STFU.

  • Loki||

    Oh yeah, and Hi Mary! Take your fucking meds.

  • Alice Bowie||

    Who gives a shit what its called.

    Any weapon with rapid fire capabilities in which a principal and another teacher were not able to stop this guys is a problem.

  • Gray Ghost||

    Alice, so you want to ban all non single-shot firearms essentially? Because an unarmed principal, or cop, or anyone this side of Jet Li, is probably not going to be able to stop someone armed with even a revolver, never mind a shotgun.

    Why do you think gun owners are so passionate about keeping their guns? It's because your options without one, when facing someone at close range with one, are few, and usually suck. Let the schools improve how they control access. Let any CHL holders carry, if they want to---many of them won't. And if the school and the voters through the school board, want to pay the property taxes to pay for a cop to sit at the school all day and scratch his ass (not that he did much fucking good at Columbine.), then do that too. But trying to ban ugly black rifles isn't going to accomplish anything.

  • ||

    OMFG,
    Pedantic AND Dickless gun fetishist.

  • Fool||

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-20776784

    And the dear leader has made his wildly original and unique move.

  • ||

    If Amerrrrika is lucky, the incumbent will succeed in disarming you nutbars.

  • Brubaker||

    "within a few years more people would be killed by teachers who fired their weapons accidentally or in misplaced anger or fear, or by students who stole their teachers' guns, than have ever been killed in school massacres."

    Although permitting armed teachers in public schools may arguably not be the best idea, there is absolutely no empirical basis for these assertions. People who have applied for and received concealed carry permits statistically are exceedingly unlikely to be involved in any gun-related criminal activity.

  • Bob Smith||

    Good article - just one qualm. A proper "assault weapon" ban (poor terminology) may not have prevented it, but may have reduced the scope.

  • attractions guide||

    I hope not, this is not a good thing.

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