Prometheus

Director Ridley Scott returns to the universe he created in Alien.

Among several things that commend it—not least the baroque design and slick visuals you’d expect of any back-to-the-future mission mounted by Ridley Scott—the new Prometheus contains the most electrifying body-horror shock scene in recent memory. It’s part of a harrowing sequence, already icky enough in conception, that climaxes in a claustrophobically walled-in space. The scene is explosive and gut-churning and very messy, of course; and no matter how much you might wish it otherwise, it’s unforgettable. Too bad, then, that the movie’s discursive narrative leeches energy from the proceedings, and that it only intermittently approaches this level of graphic power.

Prometheus seems to have hovered above us for more than a year now. The long, steady drip of pre-release promotion was coy about what the movie would actually be. Now we see that it is, in fact, not exactly a prequel to Alien, the 1979 game-changer in which Scott scuffed up and pulped out the pristine techiness that had dominated sci-fi films over the decade since Stanley Kubrick’s 2001. Heading in another direction, Scott created a wet, grotty darkland of inescapable horror that still resonates.

The new picture, made from a script by Jon Spaihts that was reworked by Damon Lindelof, one of the creators of Lost, returns to the treacherous Alien universe—to what might be called the adolescence of the title monster—to tell a separate story, one not intended, in the George Lucas manner, to neatly butt up against the beginning of the earlier film. This clever narrative strategy allows the possibility—well, the iron certainty—of a sequel that can take the franchise into new areas of Kubrick-style philosophical musing while retaining the genre imperatives of menace and doom and heavily chewed humans.

This time out we find ourselves aboard the Prometheus, an intergalactic expeditionary ship far grander than the shabby Nostromo of 30 years ago. (One suite in the vessel contains a grand piano and crystal chandelier.) Among its 17-member crew are two lovebird archeologists, Elizabeth Shaw (Noomi Rapace) and Charlie Holloway (Logan Marshall-Green), whose researches among the world’s prehistoric cave paintings have revealed a common image of figures pointing up to the sky, toward a faraway galaxy. Shaw and Holloway have somehow managed to pinpoint this place, and a predictably sinister corporation called Weyland Industries is now financing the two-year trip to reach it. Shaw, whose religious faith is proddingly signified by the small cross she wears, hopes to find the origin of the human race—to meet our makers. Holloway, a skeptic for whom science explains all, scoffs at her beliefs. (We already have a small idea of what’s going on from a prologue involving a hairless, muscular being—a sort of interstellar professional wrestler—who on a visit to primordial Earth sheds some genes into a body of water of the sort from which planetary life will later emerge.)

The size of the crew—three times as large as that of the Nostromo—is one of the flaws that flatten the movie’s effect. Although the script fitfully stirs our interest in a pair of characters who ultimately linger too long in a place they shouldn’t, most of the rest are set-dressing. There’s really only room to focus on five of them: Shaw and Holloway; Meredith Vickers (Charlize Theron in ice-bitch mode), the Weyland exec who’s onboard to ensure the fulfillment of the company’s shadowy agenda; the ship’s salty captain, Janek (Idris Elba); and, most memorably, a sleek blond android called David (Michael Fassbender), who is far more intelligent than the earthlings who surround him, but is consigned to menial duties as the ship’s housekeeper.

With his precisely stilted movements and unshakably bland amiability, Fassbender gives the movie’s most inventive performance. While the rest of the crew is tucked away in a two-year hyper-nap, we see him pottering around the ship on his own, devoting long hours to studying ancient languages, and—in the film’s wittiest conceit—whiling away more of his abundant spare time studying a wide-screen video of Lawrence of Arabia, entranced by the glamorously styled blond hair of that film’s star, Peter O’Toole. David seems to know more about the object of the ship’s mission than he’s willing to convey (another flaw—the character’s intentions are never clarified). When his shipmates wonder about the beings who contributed their DNA to the human gene pool and, more important, why they created us, David replies, with the ghost of a smirk, “Why do you think your people made me?”

On reaching their destination, the explorers find a hostile planet whose only breathable air is inside a huge rock formation that resembles a pyramid. Mapping its interior, they come upon a number of unsettling things: a huge stone head, indecipherable wall markings, hidden chambers, and—oops—a vast assembly of oozing urns. A number of wonderfully horrible things happen, involving infected eyeballs and snapping bones, and before very long at all we encounter the fearsomely tentacled precursor to the slimy killing machine of Alien.

The movie has a great look, elegantly deepened by Scott’s intelligent use of 3D. There are some odd kinks in the story (a reference to a wheezing concertina said to have once been owned by Steven Stills—possibly an inside joke of some sort—may puzzle anyone familiar with Stills’ instrumental specialty.) And it’s not clear whether Rapace—sweet and spirited here, a world away from her Dragon Tattoo girl—is yet ready to carry a big Hollywood production; or why Guy Pearce should have been brought in to be unrecognizable as Weyland, the wrinkled company founder, who is introduced as a shimmery hologram.

Still, if Prometheus weren’t burdened by the expectations engendered by Alien, a masterwork of sci-fi modernism, it would surely be greeted as a superior genre exercise. It’s exciting in parts, even if the excitement isn’t maintained. And while the movie’s earnest spiritual ponderings may seem hackneyed to some viewers, that, of course, is a tribute to their eternal fascination—to their real mystery. Toward the end of the picture, when one of the characters says, “Time to go home,” we realize that none of them is any longer sure where “home” might be. 

Kurt Loder is a writer living in New York. His third book, a collection of film reviews called The Good, the Bad and the Godawful, is now available. Follow him on Twitter at kurt_loder.

Find this and hundreds of other interesting books at the Reason Shop, powered by Amazon.

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    For those who haven't seen it, the trailer. Even on a 2D monitor, the beautiful 3D clearly pops.

  • Brandybuck||

    Hoping they do the whole movie that way...

  • RBS||

    I'm going to see this tomorrow. I had to promise the wife some extra shopping time for her to agree to us seeing separate movies (she's going to see Snow White and The Huntsman). I better not be disappointed

  • ||

    We saw Snow White last weekend, and we weren't overly impressed. Kinda like a mashup of Twilight and Alice In Wonderland. So unless she's the type who cannot handle scary/gory movies, your wife would probably be better off seeing Prometheus with you.

  • ||

    You will be. It's fucking terrible.

  • waffles||

    So the movie isn't really about anything? This review actually disappoints me. I was excited to see this. Drag.

  • ||

    I was excited to see this. Drag.

    So see it! Just because Kurt Loder doesn't like it doesn't mean you won't. It's doing well at Rotten Tomatoes, so Loder is in the minority here. Hell, Roger Ebert gave it four stars.

  • John||

    But Ebert is retarded. And for that matter so are most of the reviewers on Rotten Tomatoes. Joe Moganstern of the WSJ, whose opinion I very much trust, says exactly the same thing as Loader.

  • ||

    But Ebert is retarded.

    Ebert goes full retard whenever he talks politics, and I wish he would do a lot less of that. But the man has an encyclopedic knowledge of cinema, and what's more, he can write. With a few notable exceptions (he trashed The Untouchables, for instance), I find that his taste in film meshes with mine, which is really all that counts when you're looking for a film critic you like.

  • John||

    Ebert hated Dirty Harry.

  • ||

    Ebert hated Dirty Harry.

    He gave the movie 3 stars, a positive rating. He called its moral position "fascist," but he nonetheless praised it as a good movie.

  • JW||

    One of the best sci-fi movie reviewers there was, was Stephen Hunter, who, alas, doesn't do reviews any longer. He got sci-fi and his reviews were always spot-on, even when I didn't want to agree with him.

  • Sam Grove||

    Ebert like Predator, but he didn't understand why those aliens were coming to our planet.

  • ||

    In the eastern United States when they count how many points a deer antler has they count both sides as well as the brow points.

    So they call a little bitty 2 point buck a 6 point.

    I think this explains just about everything.

  • CE||

    I generally agree with Ebert's reviews, although I'll never understand how he missed the four-star brilliance of O Brother Where Art Thou?

  • ||

    I generally agree with Ebert's reviews, although I'll never understand how he missed the four-star brilliance of O Brother Where Art Thou?

    He definitely fucked up there. What's more, he also trashed Raising Arizona.

  • Agammamon||

    He doesn't really handle quirky/wierd movies well.

  • Bill||

    Just saw it. Great visually but a lot of plot holes.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    I though Aliens vs Predator was the prequel to Alien.

  • Agammamon||

    Yah, know, its too bad they NEVER MADE THAT MOVIE!

  • ||

    Actually the time line of Prometheus totally fucks up the time line of Aliens vs Predator as the "Aliens" did not yet exist in 2094.

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    Still going to see it. I can still clearly remember John Hurt's sternum busting open when I was twelve years old. I stood up and slowly backed out of the room, muttering something about being tired and wanting to go to bed.

  • John||

    It sounds like they took what could have been a great movie and fucked it up by focus grouping and writing the script by committee. Hey we need a love story here because women are an important demographic that usually are not attracted to SCI FI movies. Hey, we need some kind of explosion here because the under 18 demographic loses attention if there isn't one every ten minutes of screen time and so forth. By the time they hit all of the focus group buttons and everyone on the screen writing committee gets their sacred cow in the script, you end up with a bloated, flat movie.

    The contrast between this and Alien, with its fewer characters, tight story line and sparse dialog really tells the story of how and why Hollywood has gotten so much worse over the last 30 years.

  • LibertyMark||

    Yes. From politics, to ads, to entertainment to education, everything is so carefully crafted to ensure proper demographic coverage that real meaning is sapped away.

  • John||

    Yeah not every story is about a racially balanced and environmentally concerned group of people two of which are involved in a complicated love relationship.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    whatever happened to the simple love story.

    Boy meets girl
    Boy loves girl, girl doesn't love boy
    Boy becomes homocidal maniac
    Girl not impressed
    Boy kills girl

    The end.

  • JW||

    That's opera, not film.

  • John||

    No in Opera, boy kills self.

  • JW||

    Yes, but only after he kills the girl or her family.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Opera is singing gone awry.

  • Agammamon||

    Shakespeare?

  • ||

    It sounds like they took what could have been a great movie and fucked it up by focus grouping and writing the script by committee.

    They took what could have been a great movie and made a good movie instead.

    Go watch it. It is at least as good as Avengers.

    And when I say go watch it I mean pirate a cam recorded copy of it.

  • John||

    Go watch it. It is at least as good as Avengers.

    Joshua, you couldn't pay me enough to waste two hours of my life watching some dumb as comic book put to screen. So saying it is as good as the Avengers is damning with faint praise.

  • ||

    waste two hours of my life watching some dumb as comic book put to screen.

    I watch any and all sorts of movies. Sometimes I assume everyone else is the same.

    Anyway they are both late spring/early summer Blockbuster big budget action flicks, what else should I compare it too?
    Battleship?

    Yeah Prometheus is 18 million times better then Battleship....that help at all?

  • ||

    I stood up and slowly backed out of the room, muttering something about being tired and wanting to go to bed.

    I was eight when Alien came out. My friend had a movie poster with the monster on it in his bedroom. That poster gave me nightmares long before I ever actually saw the film.

  • R C Dean||

    I took a smokin' hot little high school sophomore to see Alien. I really had no idea what it was going to be, and she certainy didn't.

    I don't believe she ever spoke to me again.

  • ||

    I don't believe she ever spoke to me again.

    I'm reminded of the romance montage in Naked Gun where Frank and Jane walk out of Platoon, in gales of laughter . . .

    If it's any comfort, she probably swelled up to 300 pounds and punched out 3 kids before her 20th birthday.

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    I thought The [original] Blob was the prequel to Alien. No?

  • Mint Berry Crunch||

    I know this is blasphemy, but IMO Alien and Blade Runner are both highly overrated. So when Prometheus was hyped as "the new sci-fi movie from Ridley Scott!" I couldn't get as excited as some people.

  • John||

    They are both just so interesting to look at. Alien is I think not overrated. It is just a great thriller. I will give you Blade Runner. It looks cool. But it drags like hell.

  • T||

    Let's face it, one of the reasons you go see a Ridley Scott movie is because they're visually stunning.

    Blade Runner is the mark of a committed geek, though. It bores most people to tears.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    I appreciated Blade Runner more when it was over than at any point during the film. The ideas don't really sink in until about 3 days later. Watching the film, I did have to prop myself up at times. The music did not help.

  • John||

    That is how I feel about Wings of Desire. Watching it, I almost fell asleep. But then I couldn't stop thinking about it for about the next week.

  • Zeb||

    It also took me several attempts to get through Blade Runner without falling asleep. But I still think it is good.

  • tarran||

    You have to give them props for taking the mangled mess that is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep and making a semicoherent story out of it.

    On the other hand, why did they even bother trying to make a movie out of that turkey of a book?

  • Lord Humungus||

    I liked the book! /man in back of crowd

  • ||

    Same. I downloaded it one night ended up staying up until 7 in the morning reading the entire thing in one session. Couldn't put it down.

  • T||

    I've never thought Dick translated well to film. Having said that The Man In The High Castle would probably work okay.

  • Nephilium||

    I think the best Dick translation has been A Scanner Darkly. I did also appreciate Total Recall, even if it added a lot of material, and changed it into more of an action film.

  • wingnutx||

    "Screamers" was a pretty good adaptation.

    Predictable but fun.

  • ||

    I haven't read the book, so I can't speak of the quality of the adaptation, but Minority Report was a good flick.

  • 35N4P2BYY||

    Blade Runner is one of those few movies where one should avoid the director's cut. The cut released in the theater does not drag nearly as badly. Mind you, it still drags, but not as painfully as the director's cut.

  • JW||

    OK, you have shitty taste in movies. Any other shortcomings you'd like to confess to?

  • Mint Berry Crunch||

    I guess movies just work better for me when I actually give a shit about the characters and story.

    You can praise Blade Runner for being so visually spectacular and thought provoking, but answer this: Did you care at all about Harrison Ford's character? Were you emotionally invested in the success or failure of his mission?

    I disliked Blade Runner for the same reason I disliked Inception. If I don't even care whether Leonardo reunites with his kids (or whether Ford is a Replicant) then all the movie's supposed depth and cleverness were for nothing.

  • Brandybuck||

    I never saw Ford as a possible replicant. Even in the director's cut with extended unicorn scene and flock of origami swans, I still didn't see it. If I had not been told that he's really a replicant, I would never have known.

  • Agammamon||

    Deckard's not a replicant, I don't care what anyone says.

    Plus if he was then there's a whole lot of people that would have to be paid to act like they no him - Bryant, Gaff

  • Agammamon||

    YOu're not really supposed to care about Deckard. Its really about Roy and Priss, and Rachel.

  • wingnutx||

    Exactly.

  • Pro Libertate||

    De gustibus non est disputandum. That said, I think both are very good films.

    Scott's not the director he once was. "Overrated" to me applies more to his later films, like Gladiator.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Gladiator is a teen boy film. I put it on par with Independence Day. Don't go in expecting alot, but its a good popcorn flick. Atleast it doesn't drag you down with slow music and detail destroying darkness.

  • Pro Libertate||

    It had some nice moments. Particularly Oliver Reed.

  • ||

    Hmmm I love Gladiator and Independence Day, but then I was a teen boy when they came out.

  • LibertyMark||

    Hmm... I thought Gladiator had much more heft than Independence Day.

    From a political point of view, I loved the scene at the end where the Emperor's power simply evaporated to chants of "Maximus! Maximus!"

  • ||

    Gladiator is a teen boy film.

    Alien and Blade Runner are teen boy movies.

    Prometheus is as well.

    Kingdom of God was good.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Blade Runner was a sci-fi geek film (teen boy has alot of crossover, but is not necessarily coincident).

    Alien wasn't made to appeal to teen boys. It just happened to.

    Most "struggle with superior power, but win in a not very realistic way, but lots of explosions and/or blood" movies are teen boy movies, especially if the premise is thin enough to puncture with a feather.

    Neither Alien nor Blade Runner really fit that profile.

  • Iamtheeviltwin||

    I enjoyed Gladiator enough in the theater that I went twice. Got a copy for Christmas the following year and re-watched it. To this day I don't understand why I liked it so much when I first saw it.

  • Tim||

    I saw Alien when I was a young teen, the shuttle scene where Ripley strips was the perfect combo of terror and titllation to my young synapses.

    For those of you who have seen it only on TV, the small screen just robs it of the power.

  • John||

    Weaver had the best ass cheeks in Hollywood. It takes a hell of an ass to make those tighty whitey panties she had on look sexy. But damn did she do it. And the top wasn't too bad either.

  • JW||

    Yep. I dated this girl in the 80's, just because she had a striking resemblence to Weaver in Alien.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    I preferred James Camerons "Aliens" to "Alien". Ridley Scott is great at shock and awe, but it wears you down rather than inspires and intrigues.

    "Alien" was an interesting idea that couldn't really enunciate what it was about, but made up for itself by smoky action scenes.

  • John||

    I thought Aliens was kind of lame. It was just a cheesy war movie. I found the space marines to be the most tiresome set of cliches ever put on film. It was exciting in parts. But overall it just wasn't that great. Hell, I like the third one they made with Winona Rider better than Aliens.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Tiresome, yes, but "most tiresome", I think not.

    Still, better pace and more fun. Alien seemed to drag on purpose as if Scott was trying to put you to sleep before he unleashed hell.

  • John||

    I liked the dragging parts of Alien. I liked the ship and the whole look of the place. I thought it was cool just watching the people on the ship. And the drags made the action parts that much more exciting and terrifying.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    How dare your taste differ from mine!

  • ||

    And the drags made the action parts that much more exciting and terrifying.

    Exactly. The movie took time to develop mood and atmosphere. It managed to be scary even when the monster wasn't in the scene.

  • Pro Libertate||

    It's a suspense film.

  • Xmas||

    You should catch the directors cut of Aliens if you can, with some scenes from the colony before bad things happen and the "gun bot" scenes. It adds adds about 15 minutes to an already long movie, but it complete changes the pacing and adds to the tension.

  • Tim||

    My Aliens Will Go On Every night in my dreams

    I see you, I feel you
    That is how I know you go on

    Far across the distance
    And spaces between us
    You have come to show you go on

    Near, far, wherever you are
    I believe that the heart does go on
    Once more you open the door
    And you're here in my heart
    And my heart will go on and on

    Love can touch us one time
    And last for a lifetime
    And never let go till we're gone

  • Lord Humungus||

    Alien could have been a Jason slasher movie. Just change the space ship to a summer camp. Don't get me wrong, I still like it, since the "sci-fi" elements seems more true to life than the glossy elements we normally see in movies.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Alien or Aliens LH?

  • Lord Humungus||

    Alien (the 1st one).

  • Agammamon||

    Well, it was conceived as a haunted house movie in space so I suppose that characterization is correct.

  • ||

    Alien invented the group trapped in confined area kill off one by one type of slasher horror flick.

    Alien 1979

    Friday the 13th 1980

    Maybe there were ones before it but I can't think of them.

  • Iamtheeviltwin||

    I always thought that Halloween (1978) popularized the slasher film style of horror movie. However, I thought that Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) was the American genesis for the genre.

  • JW||

    I preferred James Camerons "Aliens" to "Alien". Ridley Scott is great at shock and awe, but it wears you down rather than inspires and intrigues.

    They both stand on their own in their respective genres. I wouldn't think that they're connected, or better or worse than the other, beyond setting and universe.

    "Alien" was an interesting idea that couldn't really enunciate what it was about

    Huh? It was a horror/thriller flick, designed to scare the shit out of you with more intelligence than the typical slasher film. Much scarier than its prequel, Dark Star.

  • Killazontherun||

    Mostly agree. I did not like Aliens at all for the very same reason of it being a modern war movie with a lot of barking substituted for dialog.

  • JW||

    It’s exciting in parts, even if the excitement isn’t maintained.

    This is true of nearly every film, including Alien. It has l-o-o-o-o-o-ng stretches of not much happening, but ad-libbed dialog. What matters is how the film balances the non-"exciting" parts with the action.

    I may be misinterpreting "exciting" with "action," but I would expect a significant level of exploration and exposition in a film like this. Some of the most enjoyable movies are the ones which unfold as you go along and leave you wondering about the next scene, without any "excitement."

    If you want non-stop excitement, go see a GI Joe movie.

  • John||

    ^^This^^ It is called pacing. And no one seems to do it anymore.

  • Tim||

    Prometheus has already touched me though, now when I see the Friday Funny I will scream:

    CUT IT OFF!
    CUT IT OFF!

  • ||

    Sounds like typical Ridley Scott fare - short on character development, long on grandiosity. Ever since I walked out of Gladiator I have had a (perhaps irrational) distaste for Scott's movies. Yes, I walked out on Russell Crowe in all his manly hotness. Wasn't enough for me to stop rolling my eyes and wanting to fall asleep.

  • John||

    I am still pissed they didn't make Master and Commander into a full series of movies. That movie was fantastic. And there are what 33 O'Brian books ready made for scripts?

  • Shmenge||

    There are 20 Master and Commander books, though O'Brien wrote other books as well, which I have not read.

    As a big fan of Aubrey/Maturin long before the movie came out, it was a huge disappointment.

  • John||

    The movie? I thought the movie was great.

  • JW||

    Scott's fallen off in recent years, but he still has enough cred in my book to be excited about this, since he's returning to the well that got him started in such great form.

    I feel the same way about Larry Niven, whose writing was some of the best up until the 80's. I don't like his recent solo stuff anywhere near as much as the writing he did 30-40 years ago. But he still can put out a terrific book when collaborating with other authors.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Niven was fantastic during his peak. It's frustrating that he can't seem to hit those highs anymore. Probably frustrating for him as well.

  • ||

    I still don't know what the hell happened in integral trees.

    I guess the sequel explained that the ship dropped all the poeple off to colonize the place...still the explanation seemed hollow.

  • CE||

    I though Gladiator was over-hyped when I first saw it in the theater. But I saw it again on cable this summer, and it was amazing.

    Since the film probably hasn't changed, I can only assume I have -- probably from watching so many mediocre films in between.

  • NeonCat||

    Dear Future Human Explorers,

    When you finally encounter an alien world and you have no idea what awaits you, send down some robots/drones to check the place out. If it turns out that the natives aren't friendly, the place is wildly toxic, infectious or carnivorous, at most you will lose one of your robot buddies instead of a precious, highly trained human who you will then try to save, thereby endangering your crew, ship and possibly the rest of the human race. If everything seems copacetic, then you can go down and meet the natives.

    In fact, if your technology is sufficiently advanced, you could create human shaped avatars/remote immersive telepresence androids who will walk around while your body is safe on the ship. Make it realistic enough and you'll know if the natives want you over for dinner or as dinner, and respond accordingly.

    And yes, I know my suggestions would make a lot of SF movies a lot more boring. Consider it my takeaway from cautionary tales about having ovipositors rammed down one's throat.

  • John||

    Odd that they have the technology necessary for interstellar travel but the space suits apparently haven't changed in 300 years.

  • Pro Libertate||

    If the robots are dismantled in disturbing fashion, nuke the site from orbit.

  • Translucent Chum||

    This. Does anyone actually think an initial deep space visit is going to actually include humans? We can't even put a person in orbit. This story is better as a benign robot reports that life is discovered and brings a sample back to Earth. Take it from there and send me a royalty check for your 4th of July blockbuster.

  • Pro Libertate||

    To be sure, "we" can put humans in orbit. It's just us Americans that can't.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    What are you, Canadian?

  • Pro Libertate||

    They can't, either.

  • ||

    You might want to let John Glenn know that.

    Also NASA != America. Now that they're finally taking the handcuffs off of private space exploration I wouldn't be surprised if manned spaceflight became a lot more common.

  • Translucent Chum||

    See. Using actually twice in the same sentence proves the alien has already invaded my synapses.

  • Azathoth!!||

    There are people in orbit right now--what are you talking about?

  • effinayright||

    WTF?? The Chinese just sent three more up the other day. One a woman. Granted, I'm not happy that "we" Americans aren't doing it right now, but "we" certainly know how.

  • CE||

    Which do you think is easier to replace, a humanoid android built with advanced technology, or a human explorer you can train in a couple of years?

  • ||

    Which do you think is easier to replace

    the answer is C both.

    http://www.rottentomatoes.com/...../trailers/

  • wingnutx||

    That looks great.

    (Apparently a three word sentence gets marked as spam.)

  • ||

    What is truly idiotic is that they use probes to map the alien dome thing....and they physically release them in the dome.

    Anyway the point of the mission does eventually show why they sent people rather then robots.

    Still I would think they could have sent a probe a month or two ahead of the main ship and done a shit load of work before they got there. They obviously had the tech to do it.

  • ||

    Also they have gravity on the ship...

  • Jesse James Dean||

    wtf squirrels

  • Translucent Chum||

    The Night's Dawn Trilogy would make for a HBO series. It would have to run for 10 years, but that would be all kinds of awesome.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    sorry, Game of Thrones has the 10 year spot wrapped up.

  • Translucent Chum||

    GRRM won't put down the fried chicken long enough to get the rest of the books finished in 20 years let alone 10. The first book was published when I was in college, and I'll be on the AARP rolls by time (if) he finishes the series

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    im hoping HBO poking him will help him along. These books really shouldn't take more than 3 years to write. He wrote the first 3 in 5 years.

  • ||

    I saw him reading the first chapter of the next book not so long ago.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QlJblxV3QHQ

    at the 30:18 mark.

    I have hope and the only news I have on it looks up.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    What if they made a story about aliens coming to our planet after we sent them a signal and they for whatever reason or another landed near Hawaii and got into a fight with a modern, then an old ship of the line...and...oh nevermind, that's just a silly movie premise.

  • Translucent Chum||

    Would Roy Scheider be in command?

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    It really should have been Rob Schneider given the silliness that ensued.

  • ||

    YEAH PROMETHEUS NIGHT LALALALALALALA *MASTURBATES*

    Got my tickets for the first showing after I get out of work. Can't wait.

  • CE||

    Why does it have to be inter-galactic? Isn't the galaxy already big enough?

  • Translucent Chum||

    How else would they work the Beastie Boys into the soundtrack?

  • ||

    Want to discuss what was going on in Firefly?

    Were they traveling to different stars was it all the same solar system what the hell is the whirl?

  • wingnutx||

    Many worlds associated moons in the same system.

  • ||

    It’s part of a harrowing sequence, already icky enough in conception, that climaxes in a claustrophobically walled-in space. The scene is explosive and gut-churning and very messy, of course; and no matter how much you might wish it otherwise, it’s unforgettable.

    He is talking about the robotic abortion of an "alien" from a woman's womb.

    To be honest when I saw it I was laughing out loud because it was soooo corny.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Are we talking about the new movie?

    More memorable than the Alien rendition of the Alien, the Space Balls alien punching through the stomach was the best I've seen. Especially the short dance number afterwards.

  • BunkerBill||

    Don't bother to see the sequel, I know why the Aliens want to wipe us out, they must have just saw this stupid movie and think that our species is not worth keeping around.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    I'm pretty sure that's what the "Battleship" aliens were all about. The shit we end up broadcasting to space is gonna come back and bite us in the ass one day.

  • ||

    Still, if Prometheus weren’t burdened by the expectations engendered by Alien, a masterwork of sci-fi modernism, it would surely be greeted as a superior genre exercise. It’s exciting in parts, even if the excitement isn’t maintained. And while the movie’s earnest spiritual ponderings may seem hackneyed to some viewers, that, of course, is a tribute to their eternal fascination—to their http://www.lunettesporto.com/l.....c-3_7.html real mystery. Toward the end of the picture, when one of the characters says, “Time to go home,” we realize that none of them is any longer sure where “home” might be.

  • joy||

    The scene is explosive and gut-churning and very messy, of course; and no matter how much you might wish it otherwise, it’s unforgettable. Too bad, then, that the movie’s discursive narrative leeches energy from the proceedings, http://www.zonnebrilinnl.com/z.....-3_21.html and that it only intermittently approaches this level of graphic power.

  • Teve Torbes||

    Loder's review is pretty much right on the money. The movie is good, not great. The special effects were good, but the character motivations were inconsistent and in some places completely unbelievable.

  • Heata||

    The story was pretty weak and the only interesting character was David, but it's still worth paying to see it in 3d. It was absolutely beautiful. I love movies that give you time to think and absorb, which is what the first half of the movie was about.

  • free running shoes||

    Not like other sequence, including Nike launched the initial in the year in 1987, Nike has usually launched new types and enhancements the identical range of products.

  • effinayright||

    I watched attentively, to the end. I kept saying to myself, "Hey, wait a minute".

    I never did that with the original Alien, and not in the many viewings since.

    Sucky, disappointing movie.

GET REASON MAGAZINE

Get Reason's print or digital edition before it’s posted online

  • Progressive Puritans: From e-cigs to sex classifieds, the once transgressive left wants to criminalize fun.
  • Port Authoritarians: Chris Christie’s Bridgegate scandal
  • The Menace of Secret Government: Obama’s proposed intelligence reforms don’t safeguard civil liberties

SUBSCRIBE

advertisement