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New Study Suggests There is a Correlation Between Video Games and Criminal Behavior

People are quick to point the finger or dismiss the effect of violent video games as a factor in criminal behavior. New evidence from Iowa State researchers demonstrates a link between video games and youth violence and delinquency.

Matt DeLisi, a professor of sociology, said the research shows a strong connection even when controlling for a history of violence and psychopathic traits among juvenile offenders.

Source: Science Daily. Read full article. (link)

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  • Rasilio||

    "The results show that both the frequency of play and affinity for violent games were strongly associated with delinquent and violent behavior. Craig Anderson, Distinguished Professor of psychology and director of the Center for the Study of Violence at Iowa State, said violent video game exposure is not the sole cause of violence, but this study shows it is a risk factor."

    Sounds to me like correlation/causation confusion.

    Based on this article it looks like what they found was a correlation between higher levels of violent video game play and higher levels of criminal violence, but given that they have not mentioned a causitive factor combined with the fact that the overwhelming majority of game players do not commit violence suggests that it is kids prone to violence who are drawn to more violent video games and play them more extensively rather than the games making the kids more violent.

  • ||

    Yeah, and they do the same thing with guns. Assume the gun is causitive. "Risk factor" /=/ "cause".

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