The Politics of Hardcore Punk

Writing in the Village Voice, rock critic Jason Buhrmester celebrates the new 25th anniversary re-issue of Victim in Pain, the landmark debut album by New York hardcore punk band Agnostic Front. Featuring 11 songs clocking in at around 15 minutes, Victim in Pain combined the rapid-fire sound of bands like Black Flag and The Ramones with Agnostic Front’s own uniquely aggressive style. The result was an underground classic that has influenced bestselling artists ranging from the West Coast ska-punks Rancid to the metal bands Slayer and Pantera. As Buhrmester correctly observes, Victim in Pain “deserves to be ranked within a stage dive's distance of Velvet Underground and Ramones classics on any list of important and influential New York records.”

Buhrmester also makes an absolutely essential point about the history of the famous New York rock club CBGB, which first opened its doors in 1973 and played host to many of the great punk, hardcore, and New Wave bands before closing its doors three years ago. “When CBGB belched up its last breath in late 2006,” Buhrmester writes, “the parade of nostalgia focused on Blondie, Television, and other '70s bands, largely ignoring the '80s, when hardcore bands like Agnostic Front kept the club afloat.”

Indeed, leading New York hardcore (NYHC) bands like Agnostic Front, Murphy’s Law, and the Cro-Mags easily played more shows—and spent much more time hanging out—at CBGB than anybody else, including the justly celebrated Ramones. So why hasn’t NYHC gotten its proper due in the pages of punk rock history? One answer is politics. While Agnostic Front never advocated any sort of coherent political philosophy, they did express the occasional right-wing political opinion—including criticism of New York’s welfare state and support for Ronald Reagan’s foreign policy (the band also sometimes led their fans in the Pledge of Allegiance). None of that sat too well with the overwhelmingly left-wing world of rock critics and punk rock tastemakers.

For instance, here’s the full review of Victim in Pain that ran in the September 1984 issue of Maximum RockNRoll, the nation’s biggest and most influential punk zine:

There is one song on this extremely hot-sounding thrash album that attacks in-scene violence and bashing as the Nazi activity that it is (“Fascist Attitudes”). Great! But unfortunately, much of the narrow-mindedness, fanatical nationalism, and violence that has destroyed the New York punk scene seems to have revolved around AGNOSTIC FRONT. Is it too little, too late? I hope not, but I’m approaching this band with caution.

The author of this review was Maximum RockNRoll founder and editor Tim Yohannan, a 40-something former Yippie who used his editorial perch to relentlessly police the 80s punk scene for any deviation from leftist politics. As Ray Farrell, a punk veteran who worked at the independent record label SST (run by Black Flag guitarist Greg Ginn), told writer Steven Blush, “As Hardcore developed there was an ideological development at Maximum RockNRoll, making everything move towards a Socialist bent. In a way, it’s really a continuation of the Yippie movement finding another generation to work with.”

In Yohannan’s increasingly distorted view, the occasional reactionary or conservative opinion of a New York hardcore musician revealed the whole scene to be a nest of goose-stepping neo-Nazis—and Yohannan constantly said so in print, influencing numerous readers. This propaganda war against NYHC came to a head with Maximum RockNRoll’s January 1985 issue, where Yohannan used his editorial pull to completely rework an interview that punker David Scott conducted with Agnostic Front through the mail. Yohannan was so offended by the band’s answers that he mailed them another round of questions, focusing on the “disturbing aspects to these nice guys’ philosophies.” After receiving those responses, Yohannan then edited the whole thing together, inserting additional statements of his own that literally gave him the last word on a number of contentious exchanges. It was an ugly piece of work. And considering Yohannan’s tendency to label those he disagreed with as “fascist” and “Nazi” thugs, it’s pretty revealing that his own editing of the interview demonstrated such a nasty authoritarian streak and unpleasant contempt for the open exchange of ideas.

Besides, given the fact that Ramones guitarist and co-founder Johnny Ramone was a self-described Nixon Republican, it’s pretty obvious that there’s more than enough room in the punk universe for left-wingers and right-wingers to make noise.

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  • ||

    I saw Agnostic Front live at City Gardens in Trenton in 1991. Pretty crazy. But then again, it was Trenton.

  • Walter Jameson||

    I'm sure it was a far more preferable crazy than the domestic violence/homeless crackhead crazy that characterizes Trenton today. Unfortunately, City Gardens was before my time, but if I killed someone for every case of City Gardens nostalgia I heard, I'd probably be somewhere between Dahmer and Bundy.

  • SxCx||

    I'd really prefer to talk about the Bad Brains self-titled.

  • Michael||

    Now I want to leave work early so I could listen to Bomber Zee and smash absolutely everything in sight. Who wants get punched?

  • ||

    Ah, The Cro-Mags.

    Do I even have a way to listen to cassettes at this point? The middle children of history. Too late for vinyl and too early for CDs. We are the damned.

    I remember when I got my first Blaupunkt that let you skip ahead by song on cassettes. It was bliss.

  • Beezard||

    In Yohannan’s increasingly distorted view, the occasional reactionary or conservative opinion of a New York hardcore musician revealed the whole scene to be a nest of goose-stepping neo-Nazis—and Yohannan constantly said so in print, influencing numerous readers.

    Which was in lockstep how fascistically anti-fascist the D.C. skinhead scene became during the same time.

    His views are also a little silly when there were actual fascist bands like Skrewdriver and No Remorse were at the height of their powers, and weren't terribly welcome into the American scene.

  • Beezard||

    Every Murphy's Law song I've ever heard was about smoking pot and how they weren't racist.

    Bunch of goddamn hippies now that I think about it.

  • ||

    But Murphy's Law should be held responsible for the hardcore proto-fascist anti-tooth decay crews who ran wild through the pits during the mid 80's to the mid 90's.

  • Beezard||

    *damned speed typing. should be a "with" and a few "whos" in there.

  • gabo||

    "I like guns and guns like me!" - DRI

  • ||

    That would be: D.I.

    Cause Richard hung himself...

  • BakedPenguin||

    I'd really prefer to talk about the Bad Brains self-titled.

    Root can't talk about them. They're banned in DC.

  • Beezard||

    But Root's got that PMA, so I'm sure that can't be the reason.

  • Hacha Cha||

    the best NYHC compilation in my opinion is New York Thrash. bands like Adrenalin OD, The Undead, Nihilistics, Bad Brains, Beastie Boys, Kraut, Heart Attack, The Mad, Even Worse, The Fiends, False Prophets, and the Stimulators. I got to see the two day reunion show at CBGB back in 02 and saw the Stimulators reunion with Harleys War a year or two after that. wanna hear a good anti-government spending hardcore punk song? listen to Welfare for the Rich by the Nihilistics! Adrenalin OD and Nihilistics are playing in Asbury Park on the 12th wish I could make it.

  • Hacha Cha||

    oh yeah and fuck Maximum Rock n Roll, a few years back they banned an ad that had a diseased vagina.

  • Beezard||

    fuckers! wasn't it around the same time they had some roving reporter having a sex holiday with young boys in Thailand?

  • Agent Provocateur||

    That sounds like MRR's resident "libertarian" Mykel Board. Would have been about 20 years back.

  • Beezard||

    yeah, I'm thinking early 90's..

  • wingnutx||

    That was Mykel Board, and it was a April Fool's joke.

  • Beezard||

    well, I guess there's some pretty little Thai boy-girl some where who's relieved about that.

  • ||

    I wanna be sedated. (I do).

  • Mad Max||

    The Sex Pistols were accused of being fascist because of lyrics like these (which they later had to water down for the American market):

    I am a libertarian
    I am a gold-bug man
    I know what I want but
    I don't know how to get it
    I wanna end the fed cos I

    I wanna end fiat money!
    No paper currency!

    Gold standard for the USA it's coming sometime and maybe
    I don't wanna spend a million dollars in a bread line
    your future dream is an inflationary scheme

    cos I, I want some HARD currency!
    (Maybe it's just me)

  • ¢||

    It's a class thing, like most aesthetic things are. "Stuff White People Like" culture originated in punk (or punk journalism, whichever came first).

    First-generation NYHC was actual underclass losers yelling about their lives, not collegiate slummers pretending to wail on their behalf while they're not around. That's not allowed; proles can't be trusted to signal properly.

    Bad Brains got thrown out of the canon for alleged homophobia, and even motherfucking Black Flag was out (though Rollins wormed back in recently) for gross metallic manliness and suspected libertarianism. DIY vs. DI-with-your-trust-fund was always the battle, not sides for and against "fascism."

    Agnostic Front was a great and complex band (until about 1989). But the showily earnest can't deal with undecideable irony—or maybe-not-irony. They suppress comlpexity with the "right-wing" label, as if anything but openly proseletyzing leftism is an occult apology for Hitler, fit only for shunning.

    Libertarians are familiar with that phenomenon, I think. They certainly used to be.

  • ||

    http://30underdc.com/bands/bad.....lip31.html

    Money quote:

    "FS: How'd it go in SF?
    HR: Well, it's ok, but too many faggots."
    [...]
    HR: Well that goes along with it but mostly if they just act sensible they wouldn't be so bad, most of them act so crazy even out in public, it disturbs me, makes me want to go and shoot one of them."

  • Beezard||

    I think the closest thing you'd get to libertarian punk anthem would be the Stiff Little Fingers' 'Suspect Device'.

    Some of the late 70's early 80's British anarcho-punk like Crass and The Subhumans have some great anti-government stuff.

    (Unfortunately, lots of anarcho-socialist anti-capitalist drivel as well.)

  • BakedPenguin||

    +1 or more, if I can vote more.

  • Jeff P||

    Ah, punk. The genre that rebelled against the artifice and spectacle of glam rock by dressing in studded leather, dying its mohawk pink, and using chains as accessories.

    The Gov't Issue/Rash of Stabbings show at CBGBs in 81 was probably my favorite punk show. Though the D.I. at Continental comes close.

  • ||

    I never really believed that punk was a reaction to glam, as much as it was always pitched as such.

    Pub rock was much more of a direct reaction to glam and prog rock. Punk was the long germinating seeds planted by 60s garage rock. Punk was seeking to be counter-counter-cultural, when it had a political stance beyond an ill-defined anarchy.

    Glam and punk hybridized themselves too quickly to really be in opposition. Bowie and Iggy pop. Generation X. The Damned.

  • Beezard||

    Yeah, i think glam was more an immediate influence on punk then something to be reacted against.

    At least in Britain. They were all listening to T.Rex and Bowie.

  • ||

    The New York Dolls and The Dictators were glam bands. They just didn't get marketed as such.

    Fine proto-punk bands musically, even if they did pave the way to the vapidities of hair metal.

  • The Art-P.O.G.||

    I like the punk bands that morphed (back?) into glam bands. Bands like AFI. I also have to give a lot of love to the Bad Brains.

  • The Art-P.O.G.||

    And before anyone yells at me about my lack of familiarity with punk history, keep in mind that Green Day and The Offspring were already well-established when I was in middle school.

    Also, I like The Damned.

  • ReAnimator||

    Terrible excuse. Blink 182 was well established when I was in middle school but I still know my punk history fairly well. I have to admit though, that I tend to favor the early melodic hardcore bands from Ca like Bad Religion, the Descendents and the Dead Kennedys over the NYHC bands with a few notable exceptions. I saw Sick of it All for the first tome during their 25th anniversary tour even though I'd been listening to them since I was 13.

  • Agent Provocateur||

    WTF?

  • The Art-P.O.G.||

    Hopefully, that wasn't directed toward me. Yes, I know I'm straying from the genre of hardcore punk into the multifarious aesthetics of whatever punk is these days, but, whatever.

  • Agent Provocateur||

    No that was directed at Sugarfree.I'm still trying to think of anything glam about the Dolls and the Dictators except for their "marketing".

  • ||

    I think it was more at me...

    You do know that the guitarist for The Dictators went on to join Twister Sister, right? And want is this picture of The New York Dolls remind you of more than Poison or Saigon Kick?

  • ||

    Twisted. "what does"

    Stupid distracting phone.

  • Agent Provocateur||

    Which Dictators guitarist played in Twisted Sister ? Adny Shernoff? Ross the Boss? I'm totally unaware of this.

    Your examples contradict your statement as they show the bands marketed as somewhat glam.
    Nearly all good bands looked glam in the early-mid 1970s.
    (I was trying to find an image of the verso of the Raw Power cover.I sent my older sister to the record store to buy it for me as I thought it looked "too gay" when I was 12 back in '74)

  • T||

    Not guitar, bass. Mark Mendoza. Went to Twisted Sister after the Dictators.

  • ||

    All I getting at is that glam and punk were not in opposition. The fact that proto-punk bands and glam bands of the same era are not that significantly different in their visual style and signaling is just evidence for that.

    And the direct connection of glam being corrupted into hair metal is fairly hard to deny.

  • ||

    Back cover of Raw Power, for our Agent.

  • Agent Provocateur||

    All I getting at is that glam and punk were not in opposition.
    Not at all.In the UK it was nearly a seamless transition.

    I wouldn't say The Dolls and the Dictators "paved the way" for hair metal. Not like these guys anyways.

  • ||

    Poor Sweet. I'd like to think they weren't aware of what they were doing.

    I think NYD and D only paved the way in the sense that hair metal would have had a harder time denying that they were a disposable pop phenomenon with only Sweet or T.rex as direct ancestors. It's minor point and not worth all the fussin' and the feudin'.

    As for "12 in 1974"... H&R is the only place in my life I hang out with people older than myself. It's comforting.

  • Michael||

    The drag shtick was a one time thing for them, but now it's pretty much all they're known by. I also think you're conflating glam with corny eighties cock rock.

  • ||

    The Dictators looking like extras from The Warriors.

  • highnumber||

    Yeah, like everybody else already said. Punk was in no way a rebellion against glam. They were related scenes.

  • ||

    Well, it all depends...

    Are You A Square?

  • T||

    Hmm. MRR always struck me as a bunch of douchebags. Almost, but not quite as annoying as preachy straight edge punks.

  • Beezard||

    Straight edge is fucking obnoxious. It's one of the main reasons I can't stand most American hardcore. (Black Flag and Bad Brains being two very big exceptions)

    That and all the homunculus retard tough guys who get more tattooed and more silly as time goes on.

  • Hobo Chang Ba||

    Might be obnoxious, but it's hard to deny that Minor Threat and Fugazi were staggeringly great bands. Anyway, you can't write off these bands because one or two of their songs had lyrics you didn't like.

  • Hobo Chang Ba||

    Also, note that many of the prominent straightedge musicians (Ian Mackaye being a prominent one) supported ending the drug war and very few were calling for actually banning drugs and alcohol. They might have been preachy, but many just wanted to play all-ages shows where serving alcohol would have been illegal and were trying to be good role models and tell kids to take responsibility for their own actions. Also, the really intolerant ones were generally a bastardization of the original message, especially as non-violence was a huge part of the main straightedge movement.

  • ReAnimator||

    Regardless, there was a huge perversion of the straight edge movement and it alienated a lot of people, myself included from modern-day hardcore. The tough-guy attitude and wave of hypocritical Christian bands contributed to this too.

  • Beezard||

    you can't write off these bands because one or two of their songs had lyrics you didn't like.

    Dude, don't worry. I own every Skrewdriver album and I dislike just about EVERYTHING they stand for (except hating commies).

    But I also think that if you like obscenely catchy 3 chord punk, then their first four releases kick the snot out of anything Minor Threat or Agnostic Front put out combined. My point is: I definitely take music over message.

    That said, at least Skrewdriver are often (unintentionally) hilarious. Minor Threat (despite some great songs) still come off to me as uptight weaners, even after all these years.

  • Colin||

    The original SST (which was just some store Ginn worked) is just a few blocks from me. I do a double-take every time I pass the logo.

  • Chuck||

    For the record, here is the 1/85 interview with Agnostic Front.

  • Jesse Walker||

    MRnR did have a great letters section back in the day.

  • ||

    I would have loved punk a whole lot more if it had not been so dominated by anarcho-socialists and liberal extremists. I loathed that.

    I'm glad to see a right-wing punk band. I'll try to check them out.

  • ||

    "So why hasn’t NYHC gotten its proper due in the pages of punk rock history?"

    I assume you're not kidding.

    NYHC has it's own chapter, somewhere near the middle, in every Gen X kid's personal history of punk rock, but Gen X is a mighty small group, with a mighty small voice that often seems to get lost between two groups of really loud people.

    There are the old hippies you mentioned, who seem to think everything that's happened since Woodstock was an echo of hippie culture. I had the hardest time trying to explain to old hippies that calling someone a "hippie" was about the worst thing you could call someone in the scene, the only worse thing being "poser".

    Those old people from the sixties, those hippies, who defined themselves by drug use and long hair, couldn't even conceive of a movement in which a lot of people shaved their heads and wore their rejection of drug use like a badge of honor. Somehow, it must have had to do with the sixties! It just must have!

    The second group, younger baby boomers mostly, were around and paying attention to punk rock in the '70s, but for them, punk rock was something that happened around 1976 and was over by '79 or so. These people, in their own way, made the same kinds of ridiculous assumptions the old hippies did, thinking that what came after them must have been a result of what they were plugged into when they were young.

    They use terms like "post punk" to refer to things they didn't see and didn't understand. I swear, I never met anyone at a show who referred to themselves as "post punk".

    And even as I read this piece, reading about how bands like Agnostic Front influenced metal bands...

    How 'bout the other way around, dude? I remember when a punk band that went Metal was a sell out. "Sell out" being about the worst thing you could call a hardcore band.

  • ReAnimator||

    I've experienced the aging hippie phenomenon first hand time and time again. The only counterculture they can understand is a bunch of long-haired leftists who want to live in a commune and quit bathing. If you actually listen to the lyrics of "punk" bands, they range from the far-left to the far-right and encompass almost any political ideology you can think of, many of them being right-wing or libertarian leaning. Many of them didn't seem to care much about politics at all, and just hated bloated, over-produced, self-fellating bands like Pink Floyd, Foreigner and Rush.

  • Jesse Walker||

    They use terms like "post punk" to refer to things they didn't see and didn't understand. I swear, I never met anyone at a show who referred to themselves as "post punk".

    I don't think post-punk was supposed to refer to hardcore. To me it suggests stuff like Public Image Limited.

  • ||

    I have a few quibbles, but wiki is fairly spot-on.

    Classic examples of post-punk outfits include New Model Army (band), The Sound, Section 25, Sad Lovers and Giants, The Chameleons, Orange Juice, The Psychedelic Furs, Devo, Adam and the Ants, The Birthday Party, The Fall, Gang of Four, Public Image Limited, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Lords of the New Church, Joy Division, The Monochrome Set, New Order, Killing Joke, Echo & the Bunnymen, The Cure, Bauhaus, Magazine, Wire, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Talking Heads, and Tubeway Army.
  • skr||

    I would have put a lot of those bands under either mods or new romantics.

  • highnumber||

    Mods?!

  • Beezard||

    lassic examples of post-punk outfits include New Model Army (band), The Sound, Section 25, Sad Lovers and Giants, The Chameleons, Orange Juice, The Psychedelic Furs, Devo, Adam and the Ants, The Birthday Party, The Fall, Gang of Four, Public Image Limited, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Lords of the New Church, Joy Division, The Monochrome Set, New Order, Killing Joke, Echo & the Bunnymen, The Cure, Bauhaus, Magazine, Wire, The Jesus and Mary Chain, Talking Heads, and Tubeway Army.

    That's pretty much my ipod..

    They use terms like "post punk" to refer to things they didn't see and didn't understand. I swear, I never met anyone at a show who referred to themselves as "post punk".

    It could be a generation gap thing, but when I was in a band trying to rip all that stuff off, we definitely referred to ourselves as "post punk". Or if need be "guitar based New Wave".

  • Jersey Patriot||

    I always think of Jawbox and its ilk under that heading.

  • BakedPenguin||

    I don't think post-punk was supposed to refer to hardcore. To me it suggests stuff like Public Image Limited.

    I think of later Husker Du, later Replacements, Pixies, Jesus & Mary Chain, etc.

    The genre that rebelled against the artifice and spectacle of glam rock by dressing in studded leather, dying its mohawk pink, and using chains as accessories.

    As a teenager, I used to prefer metal to punk. However, the metalheads I knew were cliquey douchebags. The punks I knew didn't give a shit about how you looked or dressed as long as you weren't a dick.

  • ||

    I always hated metal and metal light. The people in my high school who crowed the loudest about their deliberate ignorance were all metalheads. I didn't even know about the D&D/metal fandom connection until college because all the gamers I knew were into punk/post-punk/new wave.

    I've slowly backed into some of it I like, but I don't like the vast majority of it still.

  • ||

    The punks I knew didn't give a shit about how you looked or dressed as long as you weren't a dick.

    True, that. Although they have theirs, too.

    What about the DK's? Nazi Punks Fuck Off? But yeah, they were pretty left/anarcho, I guess.

  • ||

    I saw the Pixies the other night at D.A.R., doing their Doolittle re-tour. It was a fantastic show, which only was enhanced by the free box seats about 50' from the stage. It was the first show I had been to in a LONG time.

    All I can say is thank god for earplugs for my aging ears. I gotta save what I have left.

  • ||

    Huh. Twas the other way round when I grew up and in my adult experience.

  • Paul||

    pretty revealing that his own editing of the interview demonstrated such a nasty authoritarian streak and ugly contempt for the open exchange of ideas.

    Were the Yippies ever about the free exchange of ideas?

  • wingnutx||

    The only consistently good columnist that MRR ever had was Reverend Norb.

    I'm amazed they let him in there. He was like Greg Gutfeld over at Huffington post.

  • T||

    As a side note, Amazon was selling Double Nickels on the Dime by the Minutemen as a $5 dollar download a week or two ago. Good stuff for those of us who don't have a tape deck anymore to listen to our childhood favorites.

  • GILMORE||

    Side note? That should be a post of its own. Minutemen rock.

  • Aaron||

    Ben Weasel was pretty funny at MRR, generally a thorn in Tim Yo's side. The lyrics to Screeching Weasel's "Nicaragua" are inspired.

  • highnumber||

    Ben Weasel was hilarious and a total dick. I hated him and I read him all the time.

  • Hank||

    To his credit, Ben Weasel was a thorn in a lot of leftist/statist sides.

  • TP||

    CBGB, what a shithole. But that whole Bowery neigborhood was a shithole.

  • Rebecca||

    The reason why NYHC doesn't get its due is because none of the American punk bands do. I've read a lot about the history of punk, and most are written by Brits. They are fine with categorizing punk as a passing fad, with it ending in 79. However, punk never got really popular in America until the early 90's.

    I disagree that politics have anything to do with Agnostic Front being left out of history. As others have noted, the Bad Brains were religiously rastafarian in a scene that looked down on religion (until the Krishnacore fad) and they didn't like gays, yet no one criticized them. Meanwhile, Black Flag and Minor Threat wrote songs about being white that would definitely not pass for politically correct today. AF just isn't remembered as a band that was particularly original or groundbreaking. As for the NYHC scene, the youth crew bands Youth of Today and Gorilla Biscuits are much more revered.

  • Agent Provocateur||

    However, punk never got really popular in America until the early 90's.

    Depends on what you mean by "really popular", or "punk" for that matter.
    Pretty much the death of it in the(very)early 90s after Nirvana's success,the rise of "alternative" commercial "X" stations and every fucking lame-o getting briefly signed to major labels.

  • Beezard||

    The reason why NYHC doesn't get its due is because none of the American punk bands do. I've read a lot about the history of punk, and most are written by Brits. They are fine with categorizing punk as a passing fad, with it ending in 79.

    I find the opposite to be true. Sure the Pistols, Clash, Buzzcocks, Damned ect. are well accounted for. But I have yet to see any major punk documentary that even recognizes the British punk movements of Oi! (Early Skrewdriver, The Business, Cockney Rejects, ect.) or The British hardcore scene (GBH, The Exploited) or the Crass Records (Crass, Flux of Pink Indians, Dirt, Rudementary Peni) anarcho-stuff which sounded like nothing else on the planet at the time.

    You'll hear more about new York "No Wave" than any of those bands.

  • ReAnimator||

    This guy knows whats up.

  • iowahawk||

    I've had occasion to meet Roger Miret from Agnostic Front a few times through hot rodding. He founded the Rumblers NYC car club, and has a bitchin' '32 Chevy coupe. If you're in NY, you should check out the annual Rumblers car show, held every August at Union Pool in Brooklyn (right under the Long Island Expressway).

    Odd thing about the 80's DIY punk rock / skateboard scene -- as they got older a lot of them got into hot rodding, which is arguably the original DIY punk activity. Miret, Jason Jesse, Mike Ness, Steve Caballero, and Max Schaff are all pretty active hot rod and/or chopper builders.

  • highnumber||

    Agnostic Front were good, but never my faves. For NYHC, I preferred Murphy's Law, Cro-Mags, Sheer Terror, Gorilla Biscuits, Sick Of It All. Murphy's Law were a lot of fun in concert.

  • Beezard||

    Gorilla Biscuits early stuff is exactly what I think of when I think of the words "New york" and "hardcore" together.

  • TB||

    Straight edge was made for intellectual loners

    OUT OF STEP
    (I) Don't smoke
    Don't drink
    Don't fuck
    At least I can fucking think

    I can't keep up,
    Can't keep up
    Can't keep up
    Out of step with the world

  • Beezard||

    It's strange how genre names mutate. Back in the late 90's and early 2000's
    the Baltimore/DC area was inundated with a lot of slow, whiny, droning,(and wretchedly uncatchy) indie bands that me and mine collectively referred to as "emo".

    Of course, this "emo" has little musically to do with eye liner wearing (but equally whiny) teeny bopper scene that the moniker has currently adhered to.

    To this day, despite being definitively wrong about what "emo" is, I still can't except the fact that the name describes anything but that lame indie that poxed any local show I went to.

  • alias||

    Never liked punk (exceptions: Ramones and Clash). Buncha posing and lousy musicianship. Hipster cred with no content. Empty rebellion. Ugly aesthetics.

  • Library Desk Graffiti||

    EVERYWHERE YOU GO - ASSHOLE! ASSHOLE! EVERYONE YOU KNOW - ASSHOLE! ASSHOLE! EVERYONE YOU SEE - ASSHOLE! ASSHOLE! EVERYONE YOU MEET - ASSHOLE! ASSHOLE!

  • Beezard||

    Buncha posing and lousy musicianship. Hipster cred with no content. Empty rebellion. Ugly aesthetics.

    I certainly won't argue that you have to like it, but from a musical stand point, I would argue punk did nothing less than revitalize and save guitar based music.

    Again that doesn't have to matter... Especially if the perfection of "musicianship" is how many drum fills Neil Peart can fit in a half measure.

  • Blood, Sweat and No Tears||

    Good to hear someone speaking up on this because it is a rare description of how I grew up. I became a conservative libertarian as a teenager, largely in rebellion against baby boomer generation school authority figures constantly trying to shove the spirit of 1968 and political correctness down my throat. I also became heavily involved in the NY hardcore scene (Sick of It All once played by bedroom in college and one of my roomates briefly played for Warzone). I particularly went for the movement's apparent rejection of the lifestyle and attitude of hippie music, instead tending towards straight-edge, prudery about teenage sex, pro-aggression and blue collar patriotism.

    Now I'm in my mid-30s, and while my heavy tattooing shows my prior involvement with that scene, now I've given my life over to another scene, besuited, deal-making, corporate law. I often get accused of "selling out" (often by the California-based Maximum Rock and Roll socialist punks who never liked NYHC to begin with) or labelled as a "bundle of contradictions", yet I feel my progression from the Lower East Side to Wall Street is totally natural. I only stopped going to hardcore shows a couple years ago when I didn't want to be mistaken for some kid's dad and couldn't afford to go to any more business meetings the next day with a black eye. When I went to my high school reunion (a snotty northeastern establishment boarding school), those same baby boomer authority figures were still disapproving that I had gotten involved in something so grubby as capitalism instead of "making a difference" by working for the U.N. or whatever.

    I am also pleased to note that a song I used to listen to all the time, Murphy's Law "America Rules," was ranked the #16 most hyperbolic pro-America song of all time (and just about the only non-country song).

    http://www.avclub.com/articles.....s-21,2364/

  • wizard of oz books||

    With many new announcement about the wizard of oz movies in the news, you might want to consider starting to obtain Wizard of Oz books series either as collectible or investment at www.RareOzBooks.com.

  • دردشة يمنية||

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