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Bailouts Lower Cost of Borrowing to Greece

Greece saw the interest rate it has to pay to get investors to lend it money fall further Tuesday, a day after its European creditors backed the release of the country's next batch of rescue loans.

The Public Debt Management Agency said it raised 1.3 billion euros ($1.7 billion) from the sale of 13-week loans at an interest rate of 4.02 percent — that's the lowest rate since April 2011 and the second lowest in 28 equivalent auctions that started that year.

Late Monday, the finance ministers from the 16 other European Union countries that use the euro approved the release of 7.5 billion euros ($10 billion) in loans to Greece, to be paid out in May and June.

Source: Fox News. Read full article. (link)

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  • gloriajean468||

    before I saw the paycheck for $7727, I did not believe that...my... brothers friend woz like they say truley bringing in money in there spare time on their apple labtop.. there friends cousin started doing this less than 19 months and by now cleared the debts on their appartment and bourt Citroën DS. go to.... WWW.DAZ7.COM

  • Audrey||

    We all know that Greece is facing very tough financial times now. Probably it’s the country which experiences the worst consequences after the crisis. But Greece uses lending products to get out of the crisis and I think that it’s not the best way to fix the situation. When you have financial problems and try to fix them through making debts then you can get into the debt circle and it be hard to get out of it. But in any case, things are getting a little better and the whole situation in Greece slowly stabilizes.

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