Would Cesar Chavez Have Wanted Forced Unionization? UFW Says "Yes!"

A few weeks ago, Reason TV released the above video entitled, "Forced to Unionize: Is this Cesar Chavez's Legacy?" The United Farm Workers' (UFW) answer to that question seems to be a resounding, "Hell yes!"

On the eve of the theatrical release of Cesar Chavez: An American Hero, the biopic starring Michael Peña, John Malkovitch, and Rosario Dawson, UFW sent out a press release pushing a "fundraising screening" of the movie in Hollywood. And the union singles out Gerawan Farms, the company profiled in Reason TV's video, as a villain that Chavez would've wanted to vanquish:

The UFW continues Cesar Chavez's legacy. The UFW fundraiser is dedicated to the more than 5,000 farm workers in the Fresno, California area battling against their employer's stern strong resistance to implement a UFW contract. The State's Agricultural Labor Relations Board ordered the mediated contract with Gerawan to go into effect. State of California mediator at Gerawan Farming orders this contract. Gerawan is one of America's largest peach and table grape growers. Gerawan resists implementing the UFW contract and avoids paying its workers an estimated $2 million owed from last July to January - and millions more over the duration of the contract.

While you might want to skip the Chavez movie, which boasts an underwhelming 39 percent critics' rating at Rotten Tomatoes, don't miss out on Reason TV's coverage of the issue and decide for yourself whether or not UFW's description of the situation is fair.

Originally published on March 13, 2014. Original text is below:

"If Cesar were here today, he certainly wouldn't be supporting what's being done now, which is a union trying to impose itself on employees," says Dan Gerawan, co-owner of Gerawan Farms, one of the nation's largest producers of peaches, plums, and nectarines and a major employer of California farm workers. 

Gerawan Farms and some of its employees are in the midst of a fight with the United Farm Workers (UFW) union, which claims to represent Gerawan's workers, despite not having collected dues or bargained on behalf of them for more than two decades.

After years of failed efforts to unionize California's migrant farm workers, a massive grape strike started in the small farming town of Delano sparked a movement leading to the eventual rise of the UFW in 1966. The face of this movement was a man named Cesar Chavez, a man revered by labor historians as the bringer of "peace in the fields," who has roads, schools, and even holidays named after him. He's also the subject of an upcoming biopic starring Michael Peña.

But since then, much has changed in the agriculture industry and in labor politics. The UFW, which once boasted more than 50,000 dues-paying members, now claims fewer than 5,000. Yet with unionization in the industry on the decline, real wages have steadily increased. This might explain why many workers at Gerawan Farms have begun to protest—not against their employer, but against the union. 

Gerawan Farms employs more than 10,000 workers a year—more than double the entire membership of UFW—and points to county employment statistics to back up claims that it's an industry leader in employee compensation. UFW won an election to represent Gerawan Farms' workers in 1990. The company and the union had a single bargaining session, and then UFW disappeared from the scene, according to Dan Gerawan.

UFW refused to participate in the story and has not answered questions about why they disappeared for more than two decades. The truth is, they don't have to answer such questions. Despite its 24-year absence, UFW is still the representative union of the workers under California law. Two years ago, UFW initiated a process called "mandatory mediation and conciliation," which would force Gerawan Farms to impose a union contract and terminate any employees not willing to divert three percent of wages towards union dues. This did not sit well with the workers.

Silvia Lopez has worked in Gerawan Farms' fields for 14 years and raised her two daughters on her salary from the job. She once worked in a union shop and didn't enjoy the experience, saying it was like "having two bosses."

"I never liked a company where they have [a] union," says Lopez. "I don't see that I have to pay somebody to explain me my rights. I know my rights."

Silvia started a petition to hold an election to officially decertify UFW. She collected more than 2,000 employee signatures and submitted them to California's Agricultural Labor Relations Board (ALRB). Silas Shawver, ALRB General Counsel, rejected the petition.

"There were some serious problems with signatures submitted that appeared to be fraudulent," says Shawver.

Lopez denies that there were a significant number of fake signatures on the petition, but she nonetheless tried again, collecting thousands of signatures for a second time. Shawver rejected the petition again, citing allegations made by UFW that Gerawan management was putting pressure on the employees to oppose the union. ALRB, which acts as investigator, prosecutor, and judge in these cases, is pursuing unfair labor practice charges against Gerawan Farms in court in conjunction with UFW.

The appearance of collusion between the ALRB and the UFW disturbed Gerawan management and infuriated many of the workers, who staged a protest in front of the ALRB offices in Visalia. In a move reminiscent of the famous Delano grape strike, some even travelled to Sacramento hoping to have their voices heard by Governor Jerry Brown, the very same governor who created the ALRB while in office 38 years ago to create "peace in the fields" and act as a neutral arbiter between companies, workers, and unions. 

"Often what our employees tell us is, they don't trust the ALRB," says Gerawan. "They've cited Silas Shawver himself as someone they don't trust."

Following the protests, the ALRB finally granted the workers their election, to be overseen by ALRB and administered by Shawver. Prior to the elections, Gerawan Farms granted ALRB access to their facilities to conduct interviews and run private sessions to inform workers of their voting and unionization rights.

What were the election results? We don't know. Shawver has impounded the votes in an office safe, pending further investigation of the unfair labor practice allegations. He failed to provide a timeline for this investigation.

"What does that mean, to have an election and not count the votes?" asks Lopez. "Where is the right of the farm worker? Where is it?"

Lopez and her co-workers have filed a class-action lawsuit against the ALRB for failing to count their ballots. Gerawan Farms is also suing, alleging that mandatory mediation is unconstitutional. UFW continues to call for a contract to be imposed and, alongside ALRB, alleges that Gerawan has engaged in unfair labor practices.

"The main problem is in the ALRB office," says Lopez. "They are supposed to be neutral with us. But they are not. We can see that they are favoring the UFW organization."

Watch the above video for an inside look at this fight, and scroll down for downloadable versions. Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Camera by Sharif Matar and Weissmueller. Approximately 8 minutes.

Scroll down for downloadable versions of this video, and subscribe to Reason TV's YouTube Channel for notifications when new material goes live.

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  • prolefeed||

    What were the election results? We don't know. Shawver has impounded the votes in an office safe, pending further investigation of the unfair labor practice allegations.

    Sounds like the union lost the election, but the person in charge is a UFW flunky who doesn't want to count the votes.

  • Virginian||

    It's not the people who vote that count, it's the people who count the votes.
  • R C Dean||

    Oh, they've counted the votes.

    If the union had won in spite of the alleged company violations, the result would stand, and so would have been announced. The current dispute would be over damages.

  • Virginian||

    It really speaks to the power of the media that unions still have a generally good reputation among people.

  • Irish||

    It really speaks to the power of the media that unions still have a generally good reputation among people.

    Unions as a nebulous and undifferentiated mass have a positive reputation. It is telling that when given the choice American workers frequently reject unionization, though.

    Unions are like children. People have a positive view of kids in theory but when the little fucker is kicking the back of your seat during a 7 hour plane flight, reality tends to get in the way of your theoretical approval.

    People like what unions theoretically are, but hate them in practice.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    Just yesterday, a furniture dealer friend of mine was lamenting that she couldn't get some Mexican guys from Home Depot parking lot to help her move furniture this weekend for less than $10/hour. She wants to pay $8/hr. She said guys will get in the truck for $8, but the next day, the other guys in the parking lot will beat them up. So, nobody goes for less than $10.

    I commented that it sounds like an expensive minimum wage situation, enfored by union thuggery.

    I could see her brain working. But she didn't let the cognitive dissonance get to her. She just kept complaining about the $10/hr.

  • Virginian||

    The cognitive dissonance on the union front always amazed me. Like we were learning about one of the mining disputes, and there was a small gun battle sparked by the union attacking "scabs" as they were being escorted to work by Pinkertons.

    So, when a rampaging mob attacks a group of people who just want to work in peace, that's the good guys. The guards protecting the workers heading to work are the bad guys.

    Never ever understood that.

  • Irish||

    The entire concept of 'scabs' and the idea that we should hate them is sickening.

    A scab is someone lower on the economic totem pole than the union members who is simply attempting to improve the lot of himself and his family. For this he deserves disdain, hatred, and possibly deserves to be made the victim of mob violence.

  • ThatSkepticGuy||

    Yup. There's no surer way to get a Teamster or a supporter thereof to show their true colors regarding poor people and worker's rights than to bring up the idea of "scabs".

  • ||

    The glorification of unions to a particular type of person (*cough* joe *cough*) has always mystified me, but I'm pretty sure it's completely and totally rooted in CLASS WAR. It always seems to be people who either came from a blue collar family or people who look down on, but objectify, blue collar families. It seems to go hand in hand with a kind of belief in the nobility of the factory worker (not that there's anything wrong with a factory worker, but there's also nothing better about them than anyone else)...or the proletariat.

    There's also a collectivist element to it. Because unions are, at the end of the day, collectivist. As long as it's non-coercive, that's fine, but humans don't seem to be able to do collectivist without violence and coercion very well. So you see a big correlation between people who like unions and people who think collectively. It's probably because they have a low belief in their own value, so collectivism in the union form makes sense for them.

  • Virginian||

    My uncle is kind of an independent conservative Democrat type. He's IBEW, because if he tried to do his job without a sticker on his truck, he'd get his tires slashed or his engine fucked with.

    It literally is a gang. That's all.

  • Irish||

    While you might want to skip the Chavez movie, which boasts an underwhelming 39 percent critics' rating at Rotten Tomatoes, don't miss out on Reason TV's coverage of the issue and decide for yourself whether or not UFW's description of the situation is fair.

    Wow. That movie must be really atrocious if a film about a Hispanic union organizer can't get pretentious film critics to support it. This is the kind of movie you'd expect them to give good reviews to entirely out of a sense of liberal guilt.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    They already had Twelve Years a Slave to gush over. Their liberal credibility is absolutely glowing. So for this episode of Race War, it looks like blacks beat Latinos. And Asians.

  • Virginian||

    Asians

    Leland Yee, he does agree.

  • Irish||

    12 Years a Slave is actually a great movie that deserved its accolades.

    There are doubtlessly examples of progressives applauding terrible movies entirely for political reasons, but 12 Years a Slave is not a good example.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    Fair enough.

  • Virginian||

    Well but the point is that it literally doesn't matter how good or bad the movie was. If it had been truly terrible, it still would have been lauded as a groundbreaking and visionary.

    Even though there's a navel gazing "racism in America" film released at least once every two years.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    These union guys are totally dialed in on the economics of these markets, but they never buy out the owners and establish their Workers' Earthly Paradise.

    Don't tell. Do.

  • mr lizard||

    Actually the pension fund for one of the maritime unions bought a ship and tried to run it. I don't know anything about its success or failure, it was a long time ago. However what you describe above has been attempted.

  • Cdr Lytton||

    My favorite go to example is a group of unionized employees of the SEIU local. They had just as many and the same type of bitches about "management" as any other unionized workgroup.

  • SusanM||

    Because the unions care as little for "the little guy" as the "1%" does. As long as those sweet dues keep coming in they couldn't care less about any one person who's paying dues.

  • Cdr Lytton||

    That's true, but in this case, the SEIU employees were represented by another union. My poorly written post was trying to point out that the only union I've heard of with unionized employees can't create a workers' paradise in their own house.

  • Cdr Lytton||

  • ||

    "....they never buy out the owners and establish their Workers' Earthly Paradise."

    What? That is work. And risk. Fuck that.

    I just want to sit in an office, make threatening phone calls, pay off pols, and collect union dues.

    Seriously though, how are these guys different from mafias running protection rackets?

  • LarryA||

    These union guys are totally dialed in on the economics of these markets, but they never buy out the owners and establish their Workers' Earthly Paradise.

    Figure out how peple who believe corporations are evil, work is exploitation, modernization kills jobs, and profits need to be looted would run a business.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    UFW initiated a process called "mandatory mediation and conciliation," which would force Gerawan Farms to impose a union contract and terminate any employees not willing to divert three percent of wages towards union dues. This did not sit well with the workers.

    But all hispanics are Social Justice Democrats who vote hard left on everything!

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    I missed the part where they threatened to vote against Democrats in the next election.

  • Tötmacher||

    I missed the part where you weren't a proven liar and scumbag.

  • Byte Me||

    OT: Piers Morgan is still a raging douchebag.
    (Oh, and consider this a "trigger warning")

    http://www.mrctv.org/videos/pi.....s-citizens

  • ThatSkepticGuy||

    To read the HuffPo headlines yesterday, one would think that Piers Morgan was throwing a gracious and nostalgic farewell gala to a Carson-like career instead of being kicked off the network like a jackass.

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    ...in the hands of highly-trained men and women fighting for democracy and freedom, not in the hands of civilians.

    I don't think Piers understands what democracy and freedom mean. And who actually should be fighting for them.

  • ||

    Morgan - "' But that's where, I think, guns belong...in the hands of highly-trained men and women fighting for democracy and freedom, not in the hands of civilians."

    "'If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver – hit the point once, then come back and hit it again. Then, hit it a third time – a tremendous whack.'"

    Ok Piers, I will. I don't give a fuck what you think. Your opinion does not trump my right to defend myself. If you think you can take my guns from me, come try. Again, fuck you. With any luck you will be able to use your retirement time to undergo long, painful, and ultimately unsuccessful cancer treatments.

    "more guns doesn't mean less crime,........ It means more gun violence, more death, and more profits for the gun manufacturers."

    LIAR.

  • seguin||

    If Cesar were here today, he certainly wouldn't be supporting what's being done now, which is a union trying to impose itself on employees

    Uh, you sure about that? I seem to remember Chavez (dirty greasy Navajo! /youngguns) not being a particular fan of individualism.

  • sarcasmic||

    Cesar Chavez: An American Hero

    Yeah, but was he The Greatest American Hero?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Here's a question for you sports nuts in the audience.

    If college athletes successfully unionize their teams, will there be mandatory seniority-based starting rosters? Will work rules limit the number of consecutive plays any individual may participate in? I, for one, eagerly await the day when a team marches down the field to the fifteen yard line, only to be required to make wholesale substitutions.

  • Cdr Lytton||

    So you thing it'll be a conventional labor union rather than a pro sports style players association?

    (if unionization actually happens)

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    The NFL union got limitations on practices put through two years ago -- cue rampant injuries and horrible defense.

  • ||

    Hey look, it's the lying scumbag who is so socially inept he can't take the message! WHAT A SURPRISE. You must be the life of parties, Tulpy-Scumbag. You couldn't understand a social cue if slapped in the face. What's it like being that socially retarded? Don't answer that, you're too socially retarded to express it.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    Someday, with practice, I can hope to be as socially adept as you, Epi. And still manage to patrol a backwater blog comment section enough to respond within 3 minutes of a disliked person's appearance.

    Don't worry, H+R commenters, Epi's on Orange Alert. You have nothing to fear.

  • Tötmacher||

    Die in a greasefire.

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    Say what you will about Epi, Tulpa, but he's not a lying piece of shit scumbag like yourself.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    The selective moral indignation you guys have about using a fake name on the Internet is quite cute, but one wonders what's going on underneath.

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    There is nothing to wonder about.

    You are a liar who gets off fucking with people. Anyone who does such things is a lowlife shitbag. YOU are a lowlife shitbag and I think anyone who interacts with you deserves to know what kind of person you are.

    You want me to stop?

    Fine. Go to the active thread, sincerely apologise for being a shitbag, come clean on all your indiscretions and promise never to do it again. You do that, I'll stop, but god help you if you ever do it again.

  • Rollo||

    I'm both Tulpa's favorite candy and the name of the sock puppet he uses to troll the board with while lying that he is only " using a fake name on the Internet ".

  • EDG reppin' LBC||

    It's not the fake name, dude. It's when we are engaging in what was a previously a courteous argument, and the "Rollo" character starts insulting people, making personal attacks, etc. You keep trying to insist you were just presenting a different viewpoint, but Rollo's arguments turned into name-calling. I've got better things to do than to be insulted on the internet by an imaginary character created by what is obviously a lonely, bored, quasi-libertarian.

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    It's not the fake name, dude. It's when we are engaging in what was a previously a courteous argument, and the "Rollo" character starts insulting people, making personal attacks, etc.

    For me, it's not even that. He could have made all of the same points Rollo did, but as himself and I'd have had no problem with it. He claimed to be a drug counselor to lend credibility to his argument.

    AND THEN, after he was busted, he claimed he did it once, for a few hours...a claim thoroughly debunked by the commentariat who found Rollo posts dating back YEARS!

    He's a lying pig who gets his jollies by screwing with people. He is deserving of nothing but scorn and ridicule.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    Those claims are incorrect. Unlike some others I know I won't immediately jump to calling you a liar, because they may be honest mistakes.

    I never claimed to have only used the name Rollo once for a few hours. I claimed that the BACKSTORY existed for a few hours, which is correct.

    And someone used the name Rollo to post years ago. That doesn't mean it was me. We've only had registration since 2011.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    It's not the fake name, dude. It's when we are engaging in what was a previously a courteous argument, and the "Rollo" character starts insulting people, making personal attacks, etc.

    Oh please. "Rollo" only did that when Episiarch started attacking him.

    In any case, the concern about personal attacks rings hollow when you let Episiarch's behavior pass without a peep. 95% of his posts contain unprovoked personal attacks but that's OK.

    This isn't about using aliases, it isn't about personal attacks; it's about finally getting an excuse to ignore a person who questions libertarian dogma and doesn't back down.

  • Swiss Servator, mehr Sprüngli||

    Nah, it is pointing at a scumbag and jeering. Sod off.

  • sarcasmic||

    Q) How may college athletes does it take to screw in a light bulb?

    A) One. But he gets three credits for it.

  • Irish||

    If college athletes successfully unionize their teams, will there be mandatory seniority-based starting rosters? Will work rules limit the number of consecutive plays any individual may participate in? I, for one, eagerly await the day when a team marches down the field to the fifteen yard line, only to be required to make wholesale substitutions.

    Better question: If college athletes are now considered 'employees' of their schools, then are they required to pay taxes on that nifty $200,000 scholarship?

    I'm sure some offensive lineman with no hope of making the pros is going to be really psyched to leave college and get immediately hit with a $35,000 tax bill.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    Working in the campus bookstore for some extra bucks doesn't suddenly render your entire scholarship taxable.

  • Tötmacher||

    Fuck you liar.

  • SusanM||

    A better question is why are universities which charge tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars for tuition putting so much time and money into a semi-professional sports league?

  • Virginian||

    Because the sports (well football and basketball) generate revenue for the school. A well run and successful athletics program generates millions of dollars in profit which then goes to supporting the other sports which do not generate revenue, or to other university programs.

    Hell, if they repealed Title IX the big athletic programs would be huge cash machines for the real educational stuff.

  • SusanM||

    "A well run and successful athletics program". That's kinda the thing isn't it? What happens when it comes down to a school either pumping money into the sports program to make and keep it successful or supporting the academic programs that school is supposed to be about in the first place?

    I've got no problem with college sports in and of themselves, though. They do have a use in promoting the schools and such. I do think that players who aren't already being compensated with sports scholarships ought to get something out of playing for the team.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    I've always said we should treat college athletes like grad students in high-demand fields -- give them a stipend in addition to tuition and R+B if they're worth it. NCAA could even cap the stipend at $10K/yr if the small schools are afraid of bidding wars.

  • Tötmacher||

    "I've always said "

    lots of things under your sockpuppets?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    And now, as if on cue, the geniuses on Melissa Harris Racetroller's show have taken up the the collegiate sports union debate. Some guy is wondering if athletes will base their school selections on Right to work laws.

    You can't make this shit up.

    Ooh, SHARECROPPERS!

    Don't make me sympathetic to the NCAA, you dummies.

  • Irish||

    Getting to go to college for free is like slavery.

    I do think it's reprehensible that the NCAA doesn't pay players for the use of their likeness in video games, but the idea that the NCAA is akin to sharecropping is absurd.

    Some guy is wondering if athletes will base their school selections on Right to work laws.

    Given that the best college football teams are all from the SEC, which is based in states that are far more likely to have right to work laws, I seriously doubt you'll see top prospects deciding to play for a shit football team like Syracuse because of pro-union labor laws.

  • Irish||

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    I don't believe in that whole Monsanto poison conspiracy bullshit, but if it can be used against Obama, I'm all for it.

  • ||

    Thats just....uh....wow. The depth of ignorance there is ....just wow.

    I would guess that the prime evil the Monsanto is guilty of is MAKING A PROFIT. Every single premise and logical connection they use to arrive at that predetermined destination is fabricated.

    I noticed that earlier in the thread, in the link about Piers Morgan, that Morgan tossed in 'profits for gun manufacturers' as a reason to hate guns and ban them.

    What is odd to me is that none of these people have a clue what 'profits' are or why we should want them. Not. A. Clue.

    If we operated the way they think we should the entirety of humanity would be crawling around in the muck and murdering each other for scraps within 5 years.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Oddly enough, la Racetroller wonders if college sports are RACIST.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Proof. A large majority of white people are opposed to paying college athletes. RACISTS.

    The organized theft of black wealth.

  • Irish||

    It is an absolute tragedy that scholarship athletes only make the equivalent of $50,000 a year in scholarship money.

    Truly, how can our racist nation live with itself?

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    Well, they are being paid with something that's largely worthless. That could be considered racist.

  • Virginian||

    Depends on the degree. Andrew Luck has some kind of engineering degree. If he sustains a career ending injury next year, he won't starve to death.

  • Plàya Manhattan.||

    I would say he's more the exception than the rule. I'm thinking more of guys like this.

  • Dweebston||

    'We weren’t serving the kids. We weren’t educating them properly. We were pushing them toward graduation, and that’s not the same as giving them an education.'

    It's like she doesn't know the first thing about public education.

  • Virginian||

    I'd argue it's not the fault of the university that adult men cannot read. You can put the blame for that squarely on the elementary education system in this country. This kind of corruption is a result of the perverse incentives the current system has. If the contract specified that tuition would be paid for if and only if the athlete graduated with some kind of minimum GPA, then you'd see less of this I think.

    I'd be willing to bet that former athletes do better than the general population when it comes to gainful employment.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I despise the NCAA. I am, in fact, sympathetic to the notion that big-time football players should be allowed to capture some of the value they help create. Especially if they can do so off the field, outside the purview of the NCAA.

    If some Ford dealer wants to pay Johnny Quarterback to shake hands and sign autographs for the tire kickers, the NCAA can pound sand.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Better question: If college athletes are now considered 'employees' of their schools, then are they required to pay taxes on that nifty $200,000 scholarship?

    I foresee a cottage industry of "financial advisors" (operating under the strict supervision of the NCAA) telling those kids, "You hafta buy NCAA-approved 'X' or invest in NCAA=approved personal development course 'Y' because it will reduce your tax bill."

  • R C Dean||

    No, tuition scholarships are called out in the regs as tax-free.

    All the expenses paid for by the school on behalf of the student are taxable, though. And for an athlete, those can really mount up. Naturally, no one has been issuing 1099s or otherwise trying to tax that income. For big-time college athletes, anyway.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-VA)||

    Room and board would certainly be taxable, but if that's the only income they have there wouldn't be much tax due. Books, mandatory fees, health insurance, and supplies used for courses are not taxable. The money spent on athletic facilities, transportation, and equipment would be a business expense for which the employee is not liable any more than a businessman has to pay taxes on the airfare his employer pays to allow him to talk to customers.

  • Tötmacher||

    If you killed yourself no one would care.

  • Cdr Lytton||

    I believe that's only if they're not receiving the scholarship as payment for performing work. Tuition paid for by an employer is taxable after the first $5250.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Well, they are being paid with something that's largely worthless.

    Oh, come now. A "Rocks for Jocks" diploma (and a strong back) should get you a job in North Dakota, these days.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    Thanks to Ted S's link this morning, I know that the Icelandic Naming Commission doesn't permit boys to be named "Cesar."

    http://icelandreview.com/news/.....scrooge-ok

  • Agile Cyborg||

    They are simply following the lead of their greatest example, the Corporation- who would impose and force its will upon anyone and anything if given the opportunity. The only limit to this excess is the government the Corporation is working with.

    The corporate prison system within our so-called open society is a good example of this.

  • Dweebston||

    Thank God our strong regulatory state keeps those corporate behemoths in line. We'd have crushed the corporate prison industry already if only drug offenders would quit getting arrested.

  • Agile Cyborg||

    The corporate prison industry isn't going anywhere. Its partners in the government regulation business will make sure of this.

  • Dweebston||

    We need stronger corporate regulations, then. The right people, top men, enforcing better rules, with more discretion.

  • Agile Cyborg||

    Corporations need stronger corporate regulations, then. The right people, top men, enforcing better, with more discretion allows them to stave off competition.

  • Dweebston||

    We need an antitrust zealot in the mold of Elliot Ness. An incorruptible to defeat the wicked corporate cronies.

  • Agile Cyborg||

    Big Pharma should name one of their skyscrapers after Elliot Ness.

  • Hash Brown||

    Don't you just love those "Unions: The Folks That Brought You the Weekend" bumper stickers?

  • Dweebston||

    "Unions: the people who brought you the forty-hour workweek" for which they demanded to be paid their old 50-hour wage.

  • Agile Cyborg||

    Unions served a purpose once upon a time until they became as corrupt as their counterpart, the multinational.

  • RishJoMo||

    Dude taht is exactly what I am talking about.

    www.GotzAnon.tk

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