A.M. Links: China Warns U.S. About Possible Default, Obamacare to Release Sign-Up Numbers Monthly, Researchers Getting Closer to Nuclear Fusion

  • how'd they expect a government website to work?Healthcare.govChina warned the US about a possible default while the White House insists it remains open to a short-term debt limit deal. Senator Tom Coburn says the US won’t default if the debt limit is not raised and Senator Rand Paul called the president irresponsible for suggesting otherwise.
  • Jay Carney says the Obama Administration will release numbers on Obamacare sign ups monthly, like Romneycare and Medicare Part D did.
  • House Republicans say they’re going to investigate reports of federal officials shutting down businesses and evicting residents on federal parklands because of the partial government shutdown.
  • The Obama Administration is reportedly no longer using “black sites” in foreign countries to interrogate extraordinarily rendered individuals, so that the government can still try them in civilian courts.
  • Arizona will continue to require proof of citizenship to vote despite the Supreme Court striking down the law. In California, Jerry Brown, who has recently signed bills into law allowing illegal immigrants to get drivers’ licenses and practice law, vetoed a bill that would allow them to serve on juries, comparing the activity to voting.
  • The FBI helped arrest an auxiliary cop in Massachusetts who was allegedly selling drugs out of his police cruiser.
  • Chinese state media reports the government has two million “public opinion analysts” in the country policing the Internet.
  • Peter Higgs and Francois Englert were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for predicting the existence of the Higgs-Boson, observed last year, half a century ago.
  • Researchers at the National Ignition Facility in California say  they’ve reached a milestone toward self-sustaining nuclear fusion.

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Arizona will continue to require proof of citizenship to vote despite the Supreme Court striking down the law.

    Disenfranchising the lazy voter.

  • Redmanfms||

    A State saying FYTW to the Feds.

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!

    Bee-eeee-aaaaa-youtiful.

  • Brett L||

    Technically, they said, "Anyone who wants to vote in a state/local election needs to show ID, still. Fuck you if there happens to be federal elections on the same ballot." Although there IS a Federal form which you can request.

  • Lord Humungus||

    I temporarily allowed all the scripts on H&R - what an unholy mess of ads and social networking.

  • Snark Plissken||

    I started getting this 10 second delay with 'processing request' every time I refresh with Chrome. So I disabled Javascript but that screwed some stuff up and still got the delay. How do you disable scripts other than adblock?

  • Mokers||

    Try the safescript extension or no script on Firefox

  • Snark Plissken||

    Okay, thanks.

  • Lord Humungus||

    I'm using Firefox - running Adblock and, more importantly, NoScript.

    NoScript is a PITA initially since you have to allow your favorite site. But once in place - no more banner ads, side google ads, pop-ups, or social media loading. It makes H&R so much faster to boot.

  • Snark Plissken||

    You don't use Reasonable?

    *gasps*

  • Lord Humungus||

    I should...

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Comments are useless without reasonable.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    I tried it, and didn't like it. I think that was more to do with Chrome than anything.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    Reasonable is like my DVR. I didn't know how much I loved and needed it until I got it.

  • ||

  • grrizzly||

    This reasonable thingy is too sophisticated. Somehow I managed to hide every single comment.

  • GILMORE||

    ""d neither of us fits the profile of a troll.""

    Guess who.


    I'M NOT AN ANIMAL!! I'M A MAN!! A MAN!!

  • mad libertarian guy||

    On Chrome use reasonable and set it in your options.

  • Redmanfms||

    Chinese state media reports the government has two million “public opinion analysts” in the country policing the Internet.

    But how many pedobots?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The Obama Administration is reportedly no longer using “black sites” in foreign countries to interrogate extraordinarily rendered individuals...

    International waters. They're not just for monkey knife fights anymore.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Lust-Filled Spiders Come Above Ground, Terrify Everyone

    Male tarantulas mostly live underground in burrows, but during mating season, their lust brings them up to the outside world in search of females, who are waiting in their own burrows.

    If droves of randy tarantulas running amok wasn't creepy enough, their mating process is. Males carry their sperm on the outside of their bodies. They weave a "sperm web," where they keep their sperm until they find the lady tarantula of their dreams.
  • Matrix||

    Warty approves

  • Swiss Servator, Kneel to Zug!||

    Warty imitates

  • Bobarian||

    Warty leaves a sticky trail during mating season

  • ||

    A term you never want to hear: "mating hooks". Warty comes to mind.

  • Enough About Palin||

    You know who else wove a "sperm web"?

  • Lord Humungus||

  • Jordan||

    So that's where Sandi went.

  • Brett L||

    This is why shotguns must remain legal. Winging the bastard with #2 Buck would probably hurry his evacuation and give injuries that would make him easier to find.

  • Ted S.||

    Why do I get the feeling they're pranking the tabloid?

  • Aloysious||

    What a crappy thing to have happen.

  • Rich||

    flue poo horror

    Nice band name.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    What's the British term for TP? Because I didn't see any up there on that roof.

  • Live Free or Diet||

    What's the British term for TP?

    "Toilet paper" is a pretty common term there too. When I was there (middle school age), the kids called it "bog paper" or "poo tickets." The adults typically referred to it as "toilet roll" or "two ply."

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    What a strange, alien language.

  • Enough About Palin||

    ‘Poopetrator’ Defiles Clothes With Feces At Yale Dorm Laundry Room

    http://newyork.cbslocal.com/20.....ndry-room/

  • Bee Tagger||

    Chinese state media reports the government has two million "public opinion analysts" in the country policing the Internet.

    Policing the internet or following FLOTUS on twitter, you decide.

  • Swiss Servator, Kneel to Zug!||

    Both?

  • Ted S.||

    The FBI helped arrest an auxiliary cop in Massachusetts who was allegedly selling drugs out of his police cruiser.

    I assume he's on a paid vacation?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    He needed some auxiliary cash. His fellow LEO were saddened by the arrest because they couldn't really use "stop resisting" tactics on one of their own and with the feds there.

  • Redmanfms||

    totality of circs, due process, best of 'Murica.

    toll-a-meter .01 hth

  • Lord Humungus||

    Dozens play chess in public to defy SF crackdown

    At least for an afternoon, the chess players were back at the usual spot they've occupied for years along downtown San Francisco's busy Market Street.

    But instead of hustling a dollar here and a dollar there with deft openings and clever traps, the mostly homeless players and their supporters were playing Sunday in defiance of a recent police crackdown and ban on the public games. And they were backed by a brass band and several homeless advocates who helped organize the three-hour "chess-in" under bright, blue skies on a hot San Francisco afternoon.
  • Drake||

    If I ever decide to become a bum, I'm moving back to CA.

  • mr simple||

    Going back to Cali? Hmm, I don't think so.

  • ||

    +1 black corvette

  • Restoras||

    Don't become a bum, but instead just decide to walk the earth...

  • Bam!||

    Two things.

    First: A brass band? Frickin' A. Better than a stupid drum circle.

    Second: "Homeless advocate?" That's a thing?

  • Redmanfms||

    Second: "Homeless advocate?" That's a thing?

    Yeah, it's a rent-seeking political parasite closely related to the "community organizer."

  • Doctor Whom||

    When chess is outlawed, only outlaws will play chess.

  • KMA Too||

  • Snark Plissken||

    Peter Higgs and Francois Englert were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for predicting the existence of the Higgs-Boson, observed last year, half a century ago.

    Obama didn't get the Nobel Prize for Medicine yesterday, despite his ground-breaking work crafting Obamacare, and today he didn't get the Nobel Prize in Physics despite his ground-breaking work in reality distortion fields.

    I think it's pretty clear the Swedish Academy is racist.

  • Zeb||

    Well maybe next time. I think they really wanted to give Higgs the prize before he died.

  • Enough About Palin||

    So Boson gets shit then, eh?

  • Zeb||

    The boson gets the stupid and silly title of "God Particle".

  • Christophe||

    Assuming this isn't sarcasm: Bosons are name after Satyendra Nath Bose. It's an entire class of particles.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Senator Tom Coburn says the US won’t default if the debt limit is not raised and Senator Rand Paul called the president irresponsible for suggesting otherwise.

    Since when is the politics of fearmongering irresponsible?

  • John||

    I love how the liberals are constantly citing the 14th Amendment as authority for dumb ass to borrow money at will. Ah no, it means the village idiot in the White House is obligated by law to use taxes to service the debt before using it for anything else. The 14th Amendment makes default illegal.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I think it is even more narrow than that. I think it only meant that Congresses could not 'cop out' on the debt, especially to military pensioners, from the Civil War.

  • John||

    But it is written broadly. The language is pretty clear that the Feds have to honor all of their debts.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    We take the context of ratification in mind in interpreting the 14th in other areas. For example, while the 2nd Amendment RKBA was not meant to apply to state governments, the SCOTUS has argued that by the time the 14th went through the RKBA was considered a fundamental liberty guaranteed by due process (well, more likely P&I, but precedent forced it into the former).

    I guess you could argue that it would then to apply to any Civil War debt style situation.

  • Doctor Whom||

    The doctrine of incorporation is a separate issue. Also, just as matter of construction of legal instruments, "including" doesn't mean "consisting only of."

  • Zeb||

    I think that the main purpose of the debt part of the 14th was to reassure creditors that though the Confederate debts would never be paid, the US would definitely pay its debts. And to give people who fought in the Civil war what they were promised.
    The left liberals who want to use the 14th to force the issue seem to think that all spending that goes to individuals is also "debt". It seems to me that paying pensions, etc. for people who fought in the Civil War was a special case and otherwise it is meant to apply to government borrowing.

  • The Last American Hero||

    +1 Lannister

  • VG Zaytsev||

    I think it is even more narrow than that. I think it only meant that Congresses could not 'cop out' on the debt, especially to military pensioners, from the Civil War.

    Even more important at the time was the clause that prevented the feds or states from honoring Confederate debt.

  • Doctor Whom||

    I love how they quote part of the 14th Amendment but leave out the words "authorized by law," which change the meaning substantially. If I didn't know any better, I'd almost start to believe that they weren't quite intellectually honest.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Out of genuine curiosity, what work do you think that language ('authorized by law') does in this context?

  • Gilbert Martin||

    If there is any default on Treasury debt it will be because the administration actively chose to do so.

    Net interest on the debt is only about 6% of federal outlays and principal payments can be refinanced/rolled over without increasing the debt limit.

    Cash is fungible. All the administration has to do is prioritize paying debt service before everything else and there will be no default.

    Refraining from paying anything other than debt service does not constitute a default.

    Default is a specific legal term that applies to contractual debt obligations. It does not apply to anything other than that.

    The adminisration scaremongers and their MSM lackeys are deliberatly trying to redefine the term to mean not paying all sorts of other things such as social security payments, etc.

    Default has nothing to do with whether any of those other things get paid or not.

  • John||

    Choosing not to pay the debt over a political dispute is a real no kidding impeachment offense.

  • Root Boy||

    I love reading all the sturm and drang about the .gov having no money. The latest excuse I heard for not being able to pay $25B a month in treasury interest (from the $200B in vig they get every month) is that there are millions of payments a month by the treasury and it is just too hard to prioritize payments.

    Damn government is like the titanic, can't steer that bitch.

  • Zeb||

    They seem to want to call all spending debt.

  • Red Rocks Rockin||

    The latest whining (and this happened in 2006 by Team Red, it's in the Congressional Record alongside Obummer's mendacious "I won't vote to raise the debt ceiling" statement) from Team Blue is that Congress needs to authorize funding for programs its already voted for.

    Really? Because if I found out my income wasn't going to meet my wishlist, I'd start looking for where I could go without instead of asking the bank to increase my credit limit. And it's rather audacious for President Cornball to scold Congress to "pay your bills." How big is the executive branch again?

  • Auric Demonocles||

    At a certain point, not raising the debt limit would cause a default. But if we're at the point that we need to borrow more to pay the debts we already owe, we are already bankrupt.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Yep.

  • Stormy Dragon||

    All the administration has to do is prioritize paying debt service before everything else and there will be no default.

    Except of course that is illegal under the terms of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Except, of course, that the Constitution is the supreme law and requires that debts be paid.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    I hear this stated a lot but I never hear an explanation. how and why is such an action illegal under the cited law?

  • Stormy Dragon||

    If Congress appropriates money for some purpose, the President isn't allowed to not spend it. We've basically got a situation with two contradictory laws, one of which says the president can't pay for things because it would incur more debt and another that says he can't not pay for things because that's a power reserved to congress.

    It's not clear which of the two laws "wins" if the debt ceiling isn't raised.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    So, in other words, you're not entirely clear whether it's illegal at all.

  • Stormy Dragon||

    In other words, no one is. When you have one law that says you MUST spend money and one that says you MUST not spend it, what are you supposed to do?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    Which means the talking point pimped by you and (among others) MattY that prioritization is "illegal" should never rear its ugly head again.

  • Stormy Dragon||

    Well if the president is free to ignore the law in this situation and not have it be illegal, why would he ignore the impound act and not the debt ceiling law?

  • John||

    School bus forced to take dangerous mountain road because asshole feds close down the safe road in the name of punishing America for the shutdown. Remember this then next time someone tells you Obama cares.

    http://www.foxnews.com/opinion.....access-to/

  • WTF||

    They don't count because they're only racist rednecks.

  • Doctor Whom||

    Here's how an Obot explained it to me. The NPS is under the death grip of the obstructionist teathuglicans. The Anointed One is apparently completely powerless over the branch of government that he heads (although he still gets the credit for everything).

  • Lord Humungus||

    The Most Dangerous States in America

    10. Oklahoma
    9. Maryland
    8. Florida
    7. Louisiana
    6. Delaware
    5. South Carolina
    4. New Mexico
    3. Alaska
    2. Nevada
    1. Tennessee

    I blame the dueling and a' feuding.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Most dangerous for sisters and cousins.

  • John||

    Those and moonshine runs. Those mountain roads are dangerous.

  • Bam!||

    Hold my beer and watch this.

  • Swiss Servator, Kneel to Zug!||

    #1 last words heard in Wisconsin?

  • Snark Plissken||

    4. New Mexico

    Gary Johnson's fault, of course.

  • Drake||

    I was expecting a Walter White joke.

  • Snark Plissken||

    In your dreams.

  • Snark Plissken||

    That was a Norm McDonald joke.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    I saw that Welch was retweeting some of that. I don't get what Norm's point was. I mean, what's the "so what?" to take away from it? You can't ever prove that it was a dream.

  • Red Rocks Rockin||

    It's not a surprise, though. New Mexico's a giant welfare state. 70% of the births are paid for by Medicaid. The Indian reservations are filled with the hopelessly dependent and socially dysfunctional. Except for a few WASP-ish enclaves, a lot of folks live just a step or two removed technologically from their ancestors in the 1800s.

    If you took away even half of the government tit, New Mexico would go back to being a glorified sheep ranch.

  • Snark Plissken||

    Yeah, I grew up there.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    If you took away even half of the government tit, New Mexico would go back to being a glorified sheep ranch.

    Perhaps in the short term, but I suspect that the state would find other means and become a better place without being a welfare state. Welfare is part of the problem, not simply an inadequate solution. Welfare begets more welfare.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    It was clear from the outset that this ranking would be a bag of shit, but it totally lost me with:

    It has among the highest rates of drug use in the country, which is known to encourage criminal activity.

    Drug use doesn't encourage criminal activity other than using itself. Prohibition sets the stage for violence, not use.

  • Bam!||

    Addiction can lead to crime.

  • cavalier973||

    Laws can also lead to crime.

  • Bam!||

    I was arguing against prohibition leading to crime. Just pointing out that addictions can lead to crime.

  • Bam!||

    I meant "wasn't arguing against"

  • cavalier973||

    Poor grammar can also lead to crime. You just murdered that sentence.

  • Bobarian||

    I'm addicted to law?

  • Numeromancer||

    You might as well face it.

  • cavalier973||

    Memphis’s violent crime rate was the nation’s fifth worst, while Nashville’s was the 18th worst. Like many states with high violent crime, poverty in Tennessee is acute, and high school and college graduation rates are lower than most of the country.

    As one who grew up in Memphis, I can say with some certainty that this is primarily "black on black" crime. I blame the looney welfare state and the diabolical "War on Drugs".

    In addition, pointing to "graduation rates" is a little disingenuous, because there are some places that "graduate" the students without having actually educated them.

  • cavalier973||

    I should also like to add this.

    The South tends toward violence because the culture ultimately derives from the English-Scottish Borderlands. We just don't know no better.

  • cavalier973||

    Also, this.

    Dr. Sowell borrows from the above tome to argue that the "hip hop culture" is actually a derivation of the "redneck culture" of the American South, which is itself a derivation of the English-Scottish Borderlands.

  • cavalier973||

    It may seem incongruous that Alaska, which has a low poverty rate and high levels of high school and college graduates, would be among the states with the worst crime rates. It has among the worst violent crime rates in part because of its forcible rape rate: 79.7 per 100,000 residents, the nation’s highest rate.

    It's all those moose wandering about without any supervision at all.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -House Republicans say they’re going to investigate reports of federal officials shutting down businesses and evicting residents on federal parklands because of the partial government shutdown.

    I think this will backfire. It will look like the GOP and conservatives are saying 'Hey, we welcome a shutdown of the government, who needs it anyways? [day later] Hey, we do not like how you shut it down, you were not supposed to shut down all the stuff people like!' And the administration will be able to trot out technical defenses under measures like the anti-deficiency act and prior established plans.

  • Ted S.||

    No matter what the House Republicans do, the President and his sycophants in the media will say the House Republicans are wrong and terrbile.

  • WTF||

    Are you really that dense? The point is that there is no reason for the Feds to be expending resources to go out of their way to cause difficulty for people, in order to try to score political points and pretend government workers are necessary for people to be able to live on federal parklands or operate businesses.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The problems are several: they have reasonable defenses to fall back onto: for liability and maintenance reasons it makes sense to close off even open air parks/momuments, plans to do so likely pre-date the shutdown talk and can be produced at these hearings. So far there is only the charges (some of which will likely prove less than fully founded) and optics against the administration, in hearings their defenses will be given lots of time.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    That's fine. Let them stand up in front of Zod and everybody and make those defenses. People will decide if they are reasonable.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    As of now we are only getting the charges against the administration and the optics against it (shots of open air monuments with 'barrycades'). Why give the administration the limelight to offer up their defenses and cast doubt on some of the charges?

  • robc||

    Because they have no defense.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I wish I could be so cocksure about things based on unfriendly news reports, but I often find there is a lot more to things than on the surface.

    The surface strikes me as quite negative to the Democrats, with such a baseline the only direction left to go would be one they will likely welcome.

  • WTF||

    As of now we are only getting the charges against the administration ...

    No, the majority of 'news' outlets are pushing the administration line that the Republicans are responsible for the 'shutdown' and the 'hardships' that supposedly result from that.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The charges about 'barrycades,' guards and cones in front of open air monuments and such is currently out there and well known among the public. More importantly it is largely uncontested. Like most reports in the coming weeks we will find that some of them at least will be less founded than others and defenses, perhaps at the least technical, will surface as the situation is better understood. Why invite publicity into that?

  • WTF||

    Because if the administration had any reasonable defenses, they would have already used them. And the 'barrycades,' guards and cones in front of open air monuments and such are not just 'charges', they are documented evidence.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The barrycades and cones are 'documented evidence' but they are evidence of charges that they are being done out of purely spiteful political reasons. Those charges can be rebutted (since there appears to be possible legal justifications for such things, there may be pre-shutdown contingency plans that could be pulled out for at least some of them, and there will be some cones/barricades that will be justified in any shutdown). A congressional hearing will invite, and give equal time, to the administration and its supporters to provide that.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    More importantly it is largely uncontested.

    Because this thin-skinned administration is always so reticent about defending itself.

    Why invite publicity into that?

    For about the tenth goddamned motherfucking time, because your hypothesized defenses will not be seen as reasonable. Do you get it now, or are you going to continue to pose the question as if it provides some kind of insight?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -For about the tenth goddamned motherfucking time, because your hypothesized defenses will not be seen as reasonable.

    I imagine you thought there would be no reasonable defenses of Obama's administration that would inspire a majority of Americans in the last election to vote him back into office.

    Not being able to see that people other than you might find what you think unreasonable to actually be reasonable is a major liability in politics.

    These stories are almost uniformly being reported by media institutions unfriendly to the administration. That does not make them any more or less false than anything else, by the way. But it does make it likely that less than full effort was made to get what are likely to be the defenses offered by the administration and supporters. Since these are essentially only being reported in unfriendly venues, why invite the public to focus on a hearings where the administration will be able to trot out its defenses? Because you are so sure no one will find them reasonable?

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    OK, so maybe you disagree with the projected outcome but, for fuck's sake, surely the concept of why those who disagree with your risk assessment would invite publicity has penetrated the neutron-star level density that is surrounding you, right?

    So you can stop asking why. You've been told why. You potentially disagree with the outcome, some maybe argue about that, rather than rehashing the fucking "why" question. You've been told why. The "why" is that people probably won't agree that the government's rationalizations stand up to scrutiny. That's why. Clear enough?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Sure, much as I can see that at least some people that otherwise would not might find the administration's defenses, when given that kind of light, reasonable I can see what you fellows are saying. I just think you are wrong. I get that you think I am wrong, and I am only answering why I disagree.

  • GILMORE||

    ""I can see that at least some people that otherwise would not might find the administration's defenses, when given that kind of light, reasonable I can see what you fellows are saying. I just think you are wrong. I get that you think I am wrong""

    ENGLISH, MOTHERFUCKER - DO YOU SPEAK IT??

    This is what happens when dumb people learn Lawyerese before Logic.

  • Swiss Servator, Kneel to Zug!||

    Why are continuing to wallow in the Blue Tulpa swamp?

  • WTF||

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The Washington Times' unnamed source is the foundation of such confidence?

  • WTF||

    Sure, just ignore all the other evidence that that is exactly what they are doing, such as shutting down roads, closing private businesses, and fencing off open-air monuments, for fuck sake. You really are the new MNG.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I am merely saying that if you are that confident on the back of things like the Washington Times quoting an single, unnamed source, you may want to step back and reassess how sure you are this will play out the way you think under scrutiny. If Mother Jones had an article with a single unnamed source I am sure you would laugh it off.

  • WTF||

    If Mother Jones had an article with a single unnamed source I am sure you would laugh it off.

    No, I would evaluate the rest of the evidence available, and if the evidence overwhelmingly supported the source's statement, I would make my judgment based on that.

    Can't you read, or are you just disingenuously ignoring the rest of the evidence at hand, MNG?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I thought I was Blue Tulpa?

    As for the substantive question, can you not see that the 'evidence available' as of now comes from, and as you might expects, favors those who share your strongly partisan point of view. There is quite a mountain of political defeats made up of fellows who thought such a foundation was sure to win the battle for them. Forgive me if I am wary of hunkering down on that foundation.

  • WTF||

    As for the substantive question, can you not see that the 'evidence available' as of now comes from, and as you might expects, favors those who share your strongly partisan point of view.

    The evidence is what it is, dipshit. You didn't actually see the fuckers trying to bar the WWII vets from their open air memorial, for no good reason other than FYTW? If the evidence favors a certain point of view, then that is reason to hold that point of view, unless refuted by better evidence.
    And now I'm supposedly the 'partisan' for looking at the evidence for what it is. Fuck off, you disingenuous fuck.

  • GILMORE||

    ", just ignore all the other evidence that that is exactly what they are doing, such as shutting down roads, closing private businesses, and fencing off open-air monuments,

    i am in central VA at the moment. consistent with an earlier H&T post, there was a story in the local paper about how area school field trips were diverted to privately - run historical parks... and when the county parks dept people found out, rushed to said locales and promptly revoked their 'permissions' ... because you see, the proper forms had not been submitted. Yeah, i sincerely doubt anyone is going to buy some narrative about how this is about saving money or reducing liability. its about making people hurt BECAUSE WE CAN. super classy bureaucratic territorialiam. A++

  • Mainer2||

    You really are the new MNG.

    You are just now figuring that out ?

  • WTF||

    Yeah, well, I guess I was just giving him the benefit of the doubt.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    I want FULL CREDIT for calling it first. Fisty may post first but I identified this simpering, intellectually dishonest,goal post moving style as MNGs long before you simple rubes picked up on it. AND IF I AM NOT mistaken I believe ProL disagreed with me. Even if this isn't the exact MNG he is close enough...I wonder if his PHD still makes him feel superior.

  • Mainer2||

    Noted, Bandit.

  • WTF||

    Who can forget MNG's classic "People with PhDs who probably make more than you are trying to have an adult conversation" rant?

  • Cliché Bandit||

    Ahh the good old days.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    If I post first then I also get credit for ALL firsts. So if a commenter is identified as a probably sockpuppet of another, infamous commenter then I get the thanks.

  • Snark Plissken||

    Tractor pulls!

  • Cliché Bandit||

    Ohh the memories...I forgot about the tractor pulls.

  • Mainer2||

    I INSPIRED THAT. The subject was Walmart. MNG was slamming their crap products. I said they carry name brands at good prices, so I shop there. He said I could stop at Walmart on my way to the Tractor Pull. My one claim to reason.com fame, and it's all but forgotten.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    TRAKTOR PULLZ!! But only after I go to the Walmart first.

  • Mainer2||

    See someone remembers.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    I remember...just not who was involved. Priceless.

  • GILMORE||

    replace "park ranger" with "career democrat".

    because if people didnt have problems, why would they look to Government to solve them? MAKE THEM NEEDS US

  • robc||

    Except they didnt shut down ALL the open air parks/monuments, only selective ones, so the argument fails.

    And fuck off with the DA bullshit.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Again, they will simply show up with predated contingency plans and such to explain all that away.

  • Root Boy||

    We've seen Obama and Carney in action. They have little ability to justify their closure strategy - Andrews AFB Golf Course, anybody?

    Their shitty strategy needs more exposure.

  • wareagle||

    who's gonna expose it? The same press that is either ignoring or excusing it?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The same people who are exposing it now. The conservative press has done a good job of getting the word out about this, and in a way where the administration's side does not get much play. My question is, why invite the administration's view and give it air time (which is what a hearing will do)?

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Are you really that dense?

    No, he's mendacious not dumb.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Because putting up cones to keep people from pulling over and taking pictures has one iota of relevance to a government shutdown. It's foot stomping petulance and I think that will backfire.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -“If I were a lawyer for the Park Service, I’d advise it in no uncertain terms to close the parks to the public during the government shutdown, because it would be irresponsible to do otherwise,” writes Richard Seamon, a University of Idaho law professor who previously advised the National Park Service as an assistant to the solicitor general in the US Department of Justice, in an e-mail. If parks remain open, “there are bound to be accidents or crimes that would have been avoided or ameliorated had officials been on duty to respond or patrol.”

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Surely this lawyer knows the law says that the police have no duty to prevent crime so there would be no liability for the failure to do so. Also, good luck suing the feds for any of that.

  • WTF||

    Bo is pretending he never heard of sovereign immunity.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Some people might want to look up sovereign immunity law. Thankfully, it is not as blanket as some here seem to think/imply.

  • WTF||

    Thankfully, it is not as blanket as some here seem to think/imply.

    The actual application of it, however, is.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Yes, because no one ever wins (or more often) settles a lawsuit against the federal government!

  • WTF||

    I'm waiting for your examples of people successfully suing the federal government for getting injured in a national park.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    This took one minute:

    -A judge has ruled in favor of a family that sued the federal government after their son was crushed to death by a retaining wall at a national park in Northern California.

    http://www.actionnewsnow.com/c.....nzUWw.cspx

  • WTF||

    So the presence of park officials made no difference. Thanks for playing.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    My goodness but you are interesting in your dogmatism!

    -I'm waiting for your examples of people successfully suing the federal government for getting injured in a national park.

    -Here is one

    -Er, subject change!

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Asking that the response bear some relation to the context under discussion is not a subject change. You could cite a breach of contract case, too, and it wouldn't be any more relevant to potential federal liability because of the absence of park rangers.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Let's stipulate that WTF asked for, and denied, that federal lawsuits for injury on National Parks successfully occur because of sovereign immunity. He was flat wrong on that, proven in less than three minutes. In the worst tradition of the internet he offers not mea culpa, sorry, I misunderstood this part of the law, it is indeed possible for the federal government to be liable for injuries that occur on park service lands. Instead he wheels to 'well, this would not involve the rangers being present or not.' Is that not at the least a bit 'smelly?'

    Now, as to the context, NEM, I believe you have said you are a lawyer, no? So can you not see how the actions of park rangers could be a factor in a lawsuit over injury? One thing that is often asked in such lawsuits is, did the owners or maintainers of the land take reasonable steps to prevent the injury? When the owners or maintainers are not even present that opens up wide avenues for any lawyer with any acumen. Can you not admit that?

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Then cite a case in which the Park Service has been held liable for failing to prevent a crime.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -Then cite a case in which the Park Service has been held liable for failing to prevent a crime.

    That is not necessary to justify keeping people out of the parks given you seem to have conceded the point about potential tort liability for other things, right?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    That is not necessary to justify keeping people out of the parks given you seem to have conceded the point about potential tort liability for other things, right?

    The case you cited had nothing to do with the presence of Park Personnel. If anything, the retaining wall case is a justification for permanently closing all parks, right?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The case was cited to smash WTF's and NEM's silly assertion that sovereign immunity foreclosed lawsuits against the federal government for injuries on park grounds. That is demonstrably false, OK?

    Now, the relation to the presence of employees supervising has been explained. I imagine when NEM returns to comment he will concede that having employees present and supervising would be a potential factor in a lawsuit where someone was injured while using the facility, since whether landowners are liable often has something to do with what reasonable steps they took to prevent such an injury.

    But of course, the mountain goat case I site below makes this superfluous.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Correction: NEM's initial comment seems more based on the doctrine of police having no legal liability to prevent crimes in general* than in sovereign immunity.

    *Which of course is distinct from the liability land and enterprise owners have to protect people from injuries while on their land, a liability that has often included taking reasonable steps to prevent attacks from third parties

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    But of course, the mountain goat case I site below makes this superfluous.

    You spoke too soon.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Consider two potential clients of yours, both who own, let us say, an enterprise where families come and children play on the things on that property. At both places a child was injured while doing that.

    The first potential client usually had employees supervise such activity who would warn them about this or that danger when it was relevant, and the second did the same. But in this instance the second client had sent all of his employees home because of a contract dispute, but he still let people come in and use the facility and the injury occurred during this time.

    Are you going to tell me that you would not prefer to have the first one as a client rather than the second? I do not know of any tort lawyer would not.

    If you concede this then you can see why the park service might want to keep people out of facilities and lands they are not supervising, and you can then explain that to WTF who has concluded the only possible reason that can be offered for them doing is instead political machinations.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    Are you going to tell me that you would not prefer to have the first one as a client rather than the second?

    That is not relevant to the main point. The main point is that there is no justification for using even more personnel to close open-air memorials, because you cannot point out a time and place where the federal park service has been successfully sued on a "duty to warn/prevent" basis.

    Seriously, monuments like the WWII Memorial are open 24/7. You aren't seriously claiming it's guarded the entire time, are you?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -A federal judge has dismissed most of a widow's claims against the federal government after her husband was killed by a mountain goat while hiking in Olympic National Park two years ago.

    -She also alleged that the park failed to act quickly once the attack was reported — the one claim that was not dismissed in Judge Robert Bryan's ruling in U.S. District Court in Tacoma this week.

    OK, mea culpa's anyone? Here is a case of a judge refusing to dismiss a count of a lawsuit against the federal government which is based on the theory that the park service did not act quickly enough in response to a fatal attack by wildlife. An entirely unsupervised park would, I think even you fellows would have to see and admit, be at far greater peril of such a lawsuit, right?

    http://www.peninsuladailynews......ntain-goat

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    An entirely unsupervised park would, I think even you fellows would have to see and admit, be at far greater peril of such a lawsuit, right?

    Uhhh, no. Just the opposite. If it was well known that the park was unsupervised, there is no duty to act on the part of nonexistent supervisors.

    Which is exactly my point with the national monuments and memorials. These things are practically like sidewalks - there's no citywide duty to monitor them.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    In a tort case a defendant's lawyer will want to be able to stand up in front of a jury and say 'we took reasonable steps to prevent this from happening. We put up a sign. We had people present to watch the kids and tell them not to play on this or that rock. We etcetera, etcetera. We are not expected to stop every accident, just to show we took reasonable steps to fulfill our duty of care. We did that.'

    If that third sentence is not true it detracts from the case.

    Don't trust me, ask any lawyer working in torts.

  • robc||

    So there are wild mountain goats at the WW2 memorial?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Yes, robc, that is exactly how the law works. The duty to warn, supervise or timely come to assist someone on your property only applies to mountain goat attacks and nothing else that could conceivably occur on said property.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    Assuming Bo Cara is right and there is some conceivable set of facts concerning "wilder" parks, that still has no bearing or relevance on memorials planted in the middle of a city.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    Mea culpa this: "Bryan had dismissed Susan Chadd's final negligence claim against the federal government Oct. 10.

    The claim had asserted that the park failed “to summon a rescue helicopter in a timely manner” after Chadd's husband, Robert Boardman, was fatally gored in the thigh on Switchback Trail on Klahhane Ridge while trying to protect his wife and their friend Pat Willits of Port Angeles from the 370-pound male mountain goat that was harassing them before Bob Boardman separated from the party and the animal followed him.

    On Tuesday, Bryan dismissed the entire lawsuit, saying there were no remaining claims, after he refused a motion for reconsideration of an Aug. 20 ruling in which he had dismissed most of Chadd's claims."

    Entire suit dismissed

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    You are supposed to be a lawyer, right? The dismissal of this claim does not mean that there could be no set of facts that would warrant a claim for not acting fast enough in response, just that it did not in this case. To the contrary, the fact that it survived the first round of dismissals kind of shows that.

    I mean, I think you are being coy or obstinate here, so let us bring it to the forefront and ask you point blank: you do not think there is a conceivable legal advantage to keeping people out of a facility or property that you usually supervise?

  • robc||

    you do not think there is a conceivable legal advantage to keeping people out of a facility or property that you usually supervise?

    So the fuck what?

    It doesnt fit with the pattern of closing the administration went with, so they cant successfully use that excuse.

    Use that excuse to explain closing a park in which a private entity has contracted to run and maintain the park?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    For the 100th time, Bo, the Park Service did not "usually supervise" these memorials or other federal lands. Do you really think if you were way out in the middle of Lake Mead that the Park Service would arrive in time to save you from a bear? They probably see you once a week at best.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -the Park Service did not "usually supervise" these memorials or other federal lands

    Do you know this to be true? I doubt they left even the open air memorials totally unsupervised. Certainly parks like Yellowstone were supervised.

    I am not arguing that some actions during the shutdowns are not petty political motivations. Some almost surely are, I have always said that.

    My point is that at least some are also almost surely able to be reasonably justified by the kind of things I am talking about.

    At present the negative stories are from unfriendly presses and the justifications are practically unheard of. My only point this entire conversation is, why ruin that by having a congressional hearing and giving the administration a spot light to offer up what it can?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    Do you know this to be true? I doubt they left even the open air memorials totally unsupervised.

    I know for a fact that open air memorials are routinely unsupervised and open 24/7. Did someone from the Park Service show up at these things from time to time to make sure giant chunks weren't carved out of the Vietnam Memorial? Yeah, but that's not what you were saying.

    My only point this entire conversation is, why ruin that by having a congressional hearing and giving the administration a spot light to offer up what it can?

    Because if the order to barricade the WWII Memorial (for example) came from the President, the whole nation is going to go nuts. There is literally almost nothing to lose. Any excuses (like yours) have been proffered by Team Blue Dogs already.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    It may not mean that there are literally no facts that would warrant a claim, but it means that the facts you posted which purported to show a claim, and asked for a mea culpa, do not.

    So, again, cite a case in which the Park Service has been held liable for park personnel's failing to prevent a crime or injury.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    OK, NEM, fresh from Lexis Nexis Law School I have your mea culpa case, and I must say it is even more on point here than I could have hoped.

    The case is Ducey v. United States, 713 F.2d 504, 515 (9th Cir. 1983).

    In this case two men were at a NPS park. They were killed in a sudden flash flood. The lawsuit alleged that the NPS negligently failed to act to warn and guard the deceased from the flood. The NPS tried to argue that since the deceased were admitted without charge the NPS was not liable, but since the deceased did business with an independent enterprise operating on the property via an agreement with the NPS the Court held the NPS could be liable. Importantly for this case, the NPS could be liable for the omissions of the independent, private enterprise as well!

    Certainly this shows why not only would the NPS have to be worried that it could be liable if, due to discontinued supervision they could not act to warn or guard against a sudden action like a flash flood, but it might also rightly be concerned about the failure to act of independent private organizations who operate on their lands (such as the ones much furor is being made over being closed during this shutdown).

    Well, what say you now?

  • FYTW||

    Well, what say you now?

    "Hi, my name's Bo, and I'm one of those super-annoying 1Ls who thinks that by engaging in wank-tastic legal pedantry he's demonstrating how smart he is, rather than providing an object lesson in why normal people and even many lawyers hate lawyers."

  • WTF||

    Asking that the response bear some relation to the context under discussion is not a subject change. You could cite a breach of contract case, too, and it wouldn't be any more relevant to potential federal liability because of the absence of park rangers.

    Exactly. Although I'm about done trying to have a reasonable discussion with MNG II.

  • robc||

    And dont forget the parks that were shut down even though the workers arent federal employees and therefore there would be no more liability issues than normal.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    WTF, your claim of sovereign immunity blocking such suits is demonstrably false. No one else is defending it now. Your inability to just say 'hey, I was wrong on that' speaks volumes, and it is not about my 'reasonableness.'

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    NEM has a point there, Bo.

  • Brett L||

    Perhaps. However, I fail to see how the NPS would be liable while furloughed. They aren't the owners, they are the managers.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    They would be liable, the distinction you are thinking of would not stand up in court.

  • Swiss Servator, Kneel to Zug!||

    I would gladly oppose you in court on that. You admitted to the Federal Bar anywhere?

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    So instead of a "closed" sign and a barricade you put up a sign that says "There is nobody here to help you if you should need it. Enter at your own risk."

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Assumption of risk is far less protecting of owners of land, enterprises and such than it once was. This would leave open considerable potential liability.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    Yeah, and we're also operating in a world where a burglar can sue his victim if he hurts himself in the act. Only a lawyer...

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Well, I am conducting this conversation based on what the law is, not what it should be, since the administration will be able to rely on the former.

  • Brett L||

    Right. A shutdown where the government stops working, not where they actively work to make people uncomfortable. I disagree with you. The Government is clearly owned by the Democrats in the mind of the public and clearly acting exactly like a protection racket.

  • Drake||

    I marvel at how the Federal Bureaucracy has aligned itself with one party. If Republicans ever come to control the Presidency and both Houses of Congress again, what is to stop them from massive federal layoffs(other than incompetence)?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Civil service laws, bureaucratic inertia, and GOP insincerity.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    GOP insincerity.

    I hate to agree with Bo, but - this.

  • Rasilio||

    I believe there are actually laws on the books preventing this.

    Now if they actually eliminated those jobs they could do it but otherwise no they couldn't

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    This would be the easiest way, pass laws eliminating the agencies and the jobs.

    Remember how much of that happened the last time the GOP controlled the White House and Congress?

  • Drake||

    Incompetence / Insincerity

    It would be fun to watch a budget showdown between President Paul and a Republican Congress - because he refuses to fund the Departments of Education and Commerce.

  • Brett L||

    Oh, you're not wrong. I'm hoping the people see the farce of governance, not that one party or another wins.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I do not think either Team has any interest in people seeing the 'farce of governance.' The theory around here seems to be the GOP will help out with that, but since the shutdown they have used theatrical stunts to 'reaffirm' that things like the NIH, national parks and monuments are part of the 'core mission of the federal government' (the actual words of GOP Congressman Kingston (Ga) during their pro-NIH rally the other day).

    What I would have liked to have seen in the face of the stories about the parks and monuments and the NIH is for Congresscritters to say 'Now, this is why these should be privatized as soon as possible, so they can cease to be political footballs and be run in a more sane, efficient, and less coercive manner.' Good think I did not hold my breath on that.

  • robc||

    The theory around here seems to be the GOP will help out with that

    False. The theory is one or two guys in the GOP will help out with that, which is one of two more than, currently, among elected Dems.

    I will register Dem (which I was from 1987 to 2007) to support zombie Cleveland in the 2016 primary if he runs. But I suspect its as likely as my support for zombie Coolidge in 2012.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Then robc let's condemn the other GOP when they act the fool, during the shutdown and not.

  • robc||

    Then robc let's condemn the other GOP when they act the fool

    I do, all the fucking time. I spent 2011 and 2012 blasting Romney.

    I ridicule McConnell and Boehner as much as I possibly can.

    Its hard right now though, with Boehner kinda, sorta showing some spine for a change.

  • robc||

    Right now, though, Obama and Reid are worse, so they get the biggest share of my condemnation.

    Unlike you, I start at the top (or bottom).

  • Cliché Bandit||

    rob, two things:
    1. Is Coolidge your best on the GOP/Whig side? I do agree with Mr. Veto Cleveland however and wish he were still with us, the tubby bitch.
    2. Don't you think it is interesting that the person to which you responded did not bother to see (or acknowledge) that your views are not tied to the GOP thus demonstrating, at the least, a level of intellectual laziness? If so then why continue? A great man once said play on your own field, not your opponents.

  • robc||

    1. Coolidge was the best president of the 20th century (the competition was staggeringly weak). There could be a number of 19th century guys I would prefer if I took the time to think about it.

    2. For the same reason I never filtered joe? Although he got filtered in about 5 minutes when he returned. I still argue with Tulpa too, so maybe Im just a fool. It took me years to get around to filtered about MNG.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    I assumed you were going by party affiliation not century. In that case I agree. I think Cool Cal had some missed opportunities (the Fed, KILL IT WITH FIRE) but overall didn't break much. Ike is in a similar bucket. As for Party affiliation I would probably lean back to Garfield, he was in office only 6 months...not enough time to do anything too bad.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -Don't you think it is interesting that the person to which you responded did not bother to see (or acknowledge) that your views are not tied to the GOP

    Where would I see this? I have not seen his '2011 and 2012' posts he refers to as evidence of such.

  • robc||

    There is a search feature at the top of the page.

    And my posts go back much, much further than 2011.

    At least the first term of Bush 2.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    so it is laziness then.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Instead of going off what I have heard from him the few months I have seen him post I should scour the archives for any proof he has denounced the GOP here? That is certifiable.

  • trshmnstr||

    I would be proud to vote for either of those corpses any day!

  • Ted S.||

    As opposed to Yes, Minister, where the UK Civil Service was aligned with itself against the parties.

  • Redmanfms||

    what is to stop them from massive federal layoffs(other than incompetence)?

    They'd be crucified for doing so.

    If the Republicans actually did what Dems do when they are in office (fire all bureaucratic appointees and hire new ones that are good little Team players) the news media would go apoplectic. The Dems would screech about the GOP politicizing the civil service and the MSM would lap that shit up.

    Remember the ongoing outrage over Bush firing 11 U.S. Attorneys?

    Remember when Clinton fired 80 of them?

    Don't forget the wailing and gnashing of teeth that accompanied Reagan's treatment of the air-traffic controllers.

  • Redmanfms||

    Besides, The GOP has never shown much interest in reducing the size of Federal government. They've just never been as smart or brazen as the Democrats in making the civil service a functioning wing of their party.

    So yeah, incompetence.

  • Drake||

    So what? Only the mainstream media and the left would be angry. It wouldn't cost the GOP one vote in the next election.

    Reagan won another term in a landslide after standing up to a public union.

  • Redmanfms||

    So what? Only the mainstream media and the left would be angry. It wouldn't cost the GOP one vote in the next election.

    They aren't called the Stupid Party for nothing.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Did the Dems fire bureaucratic appointees?

  • waffles||

    The Pew research polls on the subject seem to indicate a fairly even split on the "who to blame" question. I really doubt what the Republicans are doing is as dangerous as the Democrats. The public at large isn't going to look too closely at this or employ any real critical thinking. Most people just see the news through a lens that supports their preconceived notions.

    My bias is towards chaos. So I'm at least a little bit happy with this turn of events.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Even an even split, if it lingers, is not good news for the GOP which is likely hoping that they have their usual turn-out and enthusiasm advantages in off year elections.

  • WTF||

    An even split, with the MSM actively promoting the democrat position, is actually not good news for the democrats.

  • waffles||

    I really think that the people who are turned off by a partial government shutdown aren't people who could be turned on to the GOP in a midterm election. The venn diagram doesn't have much overlap.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    The concern, for the GOP, would be the people who could be turned on to vote for the Democrat Party in the midterms who otherwise would have stayed home and watched MTV.

  • robc||

    The concern, for the GOP

    Not even hiding your concern-trolling now?

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    Is concern trolling expressing, or in this case merely identifying, something that might be concerning? Using the word?

  • robc||

    Concern trolling is expressing "concern" for your enemy in a way that implies you are trying to help them.

    Just speak for yourself and stop devil's advocating or being concerned about the actions of the stupid party.

    They are going to act stupid and destroy themselves, sit back and enjoy it with the rest of us.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    I consider the GOP and the Dems to be enemies, but my ideal outcome for this shutdown would be something the GOP would like better. Ideally something would happen like the GOP taking the Senate which would snap the Democratic party into conceding on something big like Obamacare.

  • robc||

    I consider the GOP and the Dems to be enemies

    Good, not stop concern trolling for either one.

  • robc||

    s/not/now/

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Even an even split, if it lingers, is not good news for the GOP

    This is just flat out false.

    And even split works to the GOPs advantage because they are the outsiders and nominally anti-government.

  • gaijin||

    My bias is towards chaos.

    Then you might like Obama as Chaos!

    Obama as chaos

  • waffles||

    That's not chaos, just gross mendacity. It's close but it doesn't play with this breakfast pastry.

  • Bee Tagger||

    Peter Higgs and Francois Englert were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics for predicting the existence of the Higgs-Boson, observed last year, half a century ago.

    They should have said this award was given to them 50 years ago, they were just finally able to confirm it this year.

  • Stilgar||

    They should not have given this award. Higgs did not want it and the reality is there were 5 theorists (4 alive) who all made very significant contributions to the theory. Trying to split hairs to eliminate other researchers on the same topic so you can meet the magic 'no more than three' is not the way the award should be determined.

  • Bee Tagger||

    I don't get it, where does the dumb joke arrive in your plan?

  • Ted S.||

    Say Higgs refused it (if he really doesn't want the award) and give it to the other three who are alive.

  • LynchPin1477||

    I'm surprised that an experimentalist wasn't also included. The problem is the LHC is a HUGE experiment and singling one person out to recognize is probably almost impossible. But it was still a monumental effort to confirm the theorists' predictions, and without that the theorists have nothing more than a nice idea. As you said, the "no more than 3" rule simply doesn't work in an era increasingly dominated by big science.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    interesting aside, it is the exact same as the specialization of the workforce in econ. And with it we have seen the explosion of scientific discovery. I Pencil or I Boson?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Jay Carney says the Obama Administration will release numbers on Obamacare sign ups monthly...

    And numbers revisions every other month.

  • gaijin||

    Seasonally adjusted of course.

  • Lord Humungus||

    This is pretty rich coming from the WAPO:

    Venezuela, on the path to implosion, expels diplomats

    THE EXPULSION of three U.S. diplomats by Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro last week should be taken as one more symptom of the unravelling of the crackpot socialist regime inflicted on the country by the late Hugo Chávez. Mr. Maduro, a former bus driver picked by Mr. Chavez to replace him as he was dying of cancer, accused Charge D’affairs Kelly Keiderling and two colleagues of plotting to sabotage the crumbling national electric grid, histrionically shouting “Yankee, go home” for good measure.

    The charges are ridiculous, but there is logic to their timing. Mr. Maduro’s government is besieged by the consequences of 14 years of disastrous economic policies: inflation that has risen above 45 percent; severe shortages, including of food staples and toilet paper; chronic power outages, including one that turned out lights in 70 percent of the country last month; and one of the world’s highest rates of violent crime.
  • John||

    But it will work in America. Our top men can handle it better.

  • robc||

    Like in California, which has eliminated poverty.

  • LynchPin1477||

    A small price to pay for sticking it to the rich. Nobel cause and such.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Without implying that socialism hasn't been the primary culprit in ruining Venezuela, to believe that the CIA didn't have a hand in the implosion would be folly.

  • Enough About Palin||

    "severe shortages, including of food staples and toilet paper"

    Wouldn't this create a balancing act of sorts? No food, no need for poo tickets.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    I've always thought that the most effective weight loss plan is living in government mandated poverty.

  • Rich||

    The Obama administration plans to release data on health insurange [sic] signups through Obamacare exchanges on a monthly basis

    Maryland says only 326 have actually enrolled

    The state has about 600,000 people without health insurance.... Officials say there’s still plenty of time, so long as people aren’t deterred by website problems

    or Republican obstructionism.

  • John||

    Something like half or more of the people who are eligible for medicaide bother to enroll. Most people don't pay a lot of attention to things. There is going to be a huge number of people who have no idea they are supposed to buy health insurance and are going to be shocked when the penaltax is taken out of their tax refunds. You watch. It is astounding how out of touch a lot of people are.

  • Rich||

    How can this be, John? I thought Democratcare was placing a "Navigator" on every street corner.

  • Root Boy||

    Obama just needs to do another round of speeches to get the word out

  • mad libertarian guy||

    If you need "navigators" to help people negotiate a law that is supposed to save America, you're doing it wrong.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    Ya know, I made a forced spice evolution joke a few weeks back about the navigators and got NO PLAY! Screw you guys, I am going home.

  • LynchPin1477||

    I've tried to visit the home page of the Virginia site 4 times in the past week. Not log in to the system, not request any information, just visit the front page. The past three times I got the "site is busy" message, which didn't go away even after 15 minutes of waiting. Today it changed to "down for maintenance". I'm sure they'll get these issues worked out eventually, but my God. If this were a private company launching an IPO they'd be laughed out of business by now.

  • Brett L||

    Researchers at the National Ignition Facility in California say they’ve reached a milestone toward self-sustaining nuclear fusion.

    Fusion is now only 20 years away, comrades!

  • Mokers||

    Looks like somebody was worried their research budget would be cut in the next budget.

  • gaijin||

    Fusion is now only 20 years away, comrades!

    It is always and forever just one generation in the future.

  • robc||

    I think you missed the joke.

  • Ted S.||

    What's next? A story on how Voyager has finally left the solar system?

  • Auric Demonocles||

    Oh boy, Pro Lib and I haven't talked about space in like 14 hours!

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    It's just like magnetism & energy perpetually skittering away at 299,792,458 m/s

  • Smilin' Joe Fission||

    I cannot remember which Fusion project it is that is being funded by the Feds, but there is at least one that is doing all this to develop a pure Fusion bomb. Basically a nuclear bomb without all of the nasty fission products you get in a fission-fusion weapon.

    It is being characterized as a more elegant weapon for a more civilized age.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    While the fallout is zero the Gamma burst is going to be a muthfukka.

  • Smilin' Joe Fission||

    I really do not understand the lust for fusion. It is by all acounts much more difficult than fission and will suffer from all of the same anti-nuclear zealotry that fission suffers from if it ever comes to produce useful power.

    We went from discovering fission in 1938 to having a fully functioning fission power reactor putting electricity into the grid in 1957 (Shippingport). And that was even delayed because of WW2 secrecy issues.

    Fission is simple, safe, clean, and very efficient. Fusion is very difficult and not very efficient. It is something to continue to research but it will not be anything that will improve any of our lives or likely even our childrens lives.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    You really think turning hydrogen into helium will meet the same anti-nuke zealotry? Possibly, but I kind of doubt it.

  • Smilin' Joe Fission||

    It still irradiates the material containing the whole reaction. Fussion creates strong neutron flux fields (which is why a fission/fusion reactor would work much better than pure fusion). It is still "nuclear".

    There is no reason for the current anti-nuclear zealotry, from a objective standpoint. These people are fighting for the cause on a completely emotional basis. Facts are completely and 100% not in their favor yet they continue the fight. Fusion will meet the exact same idiocy from these green peace/environmentalist sheep. To think otherwise is completely naieve.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    There is no reason for the current anti-nuclear zealotry, from a objective standpoint. These people are fighting for the cause on a completely emotional basis. Facts are completely and 100% not in their favor yet they continue the fight. Fusion will meet the exact same idiocy from these green peace/environmentalist sheep. To think otherwise is completely naieve.

    This.

  • Lord Humungus||

    John McCain: He Beat Us in War but Never in Battle
    To defeat any adversary, the late North Vietnamese Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap permitted immense casualties and the near total destruction of his country.

    Giap was a master of logistics, but his reputation rests on more than that. His victories were achieved by a patient strategy that he and Ho Chi Minh were convinced would succeed—an unwavering resolve to suffer immense casualties and the near total destruction of their country to defeat any adversary, no matter how powerful. "You will kill 10 of us, we will kill one of you," Ho told the French, "but in the end, you will tire of it first."

    Giap executed that strategy with an unbending will. The French repulsed wave after wave of frontal attacks at Dien Bien Phu. The 1968 Tet offensive against the U.S. was a military disaster that effectively destroyed the Viet Cong. But Giap persisted and prevailed.
  • Lord Humungus||

    Of course Giap was helped tremendously by LBJ and McNamara.

  • WTF||

    And Walter Cronkite following Tet.

  • Rasilio||

    Brokaw had a lot to do with it too.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    And a $100 billion a year in Communist block aid didn't hurt either.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    I'd say he was helped most by having China as a neighbor, which was perhaps the biggest deterrent of a US invasion of the north. I think if the US had leave to invade from the beginning - just to force the NVA to stop their invasion, not to occupy the place (and SLD here) - we'd be looking back at a completely different war.

  • gaijin||

    an unwavering resolve to suffer immense casualties

    No general actually suffers the casualties unless he is one of them.

  • BakedPenguin||

    "You see, killbots have a preset kill limit. Knowing their weakness, I sent wave after wave of my own men at them until they reached their limit and shut down."

  • Auric Demonocles||

    The Spiderians, though weak and girly in combat, are masters of the textile arts. Taste like king crab, by the way. The lazy bugs actually wove this tapestry celebrating my victory as I was killing them.

  • Rasilio||

    " The 1968 Tet offensive against the U.S. was a military disaster that effectively destroyed the Viet Cong"

    Um, that was a feature not a bug in the NVA's strategy.

    While the Viet Cong was integral in the early phases of the war they were considered politically unreliable for the later stages and needed to be done away with.

    That made the Tet Offensive a double political win for them, they embarrassed the US government who had been assuring the public the war was winding down and killed off the overwhelming majority of the Viet Cong so that the few survivors could just be integrated into the NVA regulars and controlled.

  • mr simple||

    "Prioritization is default by another name. If you pay some of your bills and not all of your bills, you're in default on the bills that didn't pay," Carney said.

    This is what the mouthpiece of a childish and wildly irresponsible administration says. Tarring, feathering and being run out of town on a rail are too good for these people.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    This seems to be the new strategy, to try to get the word "default" into as many mouths as possible. Ignoring the fact that there is zero chance that we will default on the debt, and that by law interest payments have to be made regardless of what happens with the CR or debt ceiling.

  • Rasilio||

    Um, funny thing that, the 2 biggest federal expenditures are not debts and therefore can just not be paid no default at all

  • Root Boy||

    Meaning SS and Medicare? Are you saying it is default to not pay them...on time that is? They will get paid, but maybe strung out.

    I think they can cover almost all mandatory spending and interest without borrowing. We borrow less now than what is paid for defense and other discretionary.

    Not paying some corporate welfare for farming or biofuels cannot be considered default.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    IIRC there was a ruling from SCOTUS that despite public perception there is no implied contract between the government and any individual through those programs.

  • MJGreen||

    Yep. You have no right to SS payments. The government could stop disbursing them tomorrow if it wants.

  • Rasilio||

    Yes, I mean SS and Medicare.

    Technically the government is not obligated pay those benefits at all as there has been a SC ruling that the recipients do not own the benefit and the government is not obligated to pay it should they decide not to.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Technically the government is not obligated pay those benefits at all as there has been a SC ruling that the recipients do not own the benefit and the government is not obligated to pay it should they decide not to.

    All while uphold the necessity to pay SS taxes.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    If you're perpetually borrowing to pay your bills you are basically in default already.

  • Coeus||

    This is how you troll feminists.

    Title vs content. Epic pwnage. And he's linked from every damn feminist blog in existence today.

  • Aloysious||

    I don't even know what 'rape bait' means.

  • ||

    Geez. The girl interviewed in the clip who is studying journalism gave us a glimpse of the stellar intellectualism being produced among its ranks. It explains what we see on TV or the papers.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Forget life on Mars, we could soon design and 'print' alien cells on Earth, claims scientist

    We could soon be able to design cells or entire organisms using computer software and 3D printers, a scientist has claimed.

    The cells could be used to create biofuels, combat global warming, develop new healthcare and medicines and even recreate alien lifeforms on earth, if alien DNA is ever found.

    wait a minute, wasn't this the plot to _fill in the blank_?

  • John||

    Two words, Andromeda Strain.

  • gaijin||

    + 2 more: excellent story

  • Root Boy||

    What about Species with the hot chick??

  • Brett L||

    Look guys, lets make them really delicate and totally dependant on some synthetic chemical, just in case.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    +1 case of White

  • Redmanfms||

    Species

    BTW, you Pansted the link, it goes to USA Today's Editorial Board fluffing Obamacare.

  • Lord Humungus||

    such is the life of a linker.

    here we go:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sci.....ntist.html

  • Lord Humungus||

    Sex shop forced to close due to lack of 'kinky' locals



    A sex shop that opened in 2004 in the West Wales seaside town has had to close amid a distinct lack of interest from the locals.

    Any hopes of cashing in more recently on the supposed new openness the E.L. James book has engendered to experimentation in the bedroom have been dashed amid a tough economic climate.

    Trish Murray, the businesswoman behind the Nice’n’Naughty store, was left to conclude that the residents she was trying to cater to just were not “kinky” enough.
  • Eduard van Haalen||

    All those consonants inhibit the sex drive.

  • Ted S.||

    Oh, I'm sure they're kinky enough. They just don't need sex toys to get their kink on.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    residents she was trying to cater to just were not “kinky” enough

    The local sheep beg to differ.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    The internet must have taken a bite out of adult stores like this. I'd be mortified to buy these things in person but it's game on online even though that transaction creates a link between my name and the items.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    For SoCon Group, the Problem is Not Government Censorship of 'Indecency' but That Government Does Not Censor Violence as Well

    But here’s the problem: there is no regulation of violence on broadcast television, or anywhere else. None. Zip. Zero. Nada.

    The only content regulation of the broadcast medium is of obscenity, indecency and profanity at certain times of day, while none of which address violence. What’s more, the FCC indecency rules haven’t been enforced in the past five years, despite more than 100,000 Americans urging the FCC to act.

    http://w2.parentstv.org/blog/i.....ood-story/

  • sloopyinca||

    Let's see if we can count the double-standards and cop-fellating in this article.

    1: Cop not named for "civil rights reasons". Yeah, they afford that courtesy to all suspects until charged.

    2: Video not released. They never release surveillance footage when a "civilian" is accused of committing a crime.

    3: Note how the story says "they said he pointed a gun at them. But there's no mention of there ever being a gun.

    4: Note how this officer is a "shoot first, ask questions later" kind of guy...and that's put forward as a good thing.

    5: Note how when they see things a cop does that "aren't appropriate", especially with UOF issues, it results in a closed-door internal investigation. But when a "civilian" goes a little off the rails (as he apparently did in this story), he is charged with every possible law under the sun in order to ruin his life.

  • Coeus||

    I predict many more racist receipts with the offending words written in another color pen.

    Things are looking up for a Tennessee waitress who received a racial slur instead of a tip on the job.

    Toni Jenkins works at Red Lobster in Cool Springs. A few weeks ago, someone wrote the N-word on a receipt at her table.

    Instead of sweeping the incident under the rug, Jenkins went public with the matter.

    From KLTV 7:

    Her decision brought criticism. Some suspected she faked it, especially when the customer – through his attorney – denied writing the slur. In a written message to Channel 4 News, the customer said, “I do not approve of the use of that type of talk, not now or ever.” When the story went viral, a man in California took action and posted the details on the website YouCaring.com. People donated to the fund called “Tips for Toni.” And late last week, Jenkins received a check for more than $10,000.
  • WTF||

    My first thought when I read about that was that it was likely a phony incident.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    My first thought when I read about that was that it was likely a phony incident.

    I have as much certainty as one can have without having personally witnessed the event that she is full of shit on this one.

  • Root Boy||

    Yep, most racists are cowards and would not put a comment on a receipt that I assume has their name and CC on it.

  • Zeb||

    Jeez. Someone was a dick to me the other day. Can I have $10,000?

  • WTF||

    Look for a rash of people writing mean, racist, misogynist, homophobic things on receipts.

  • BladeDoc||

    Seems like the best way ever to give someone a big tip.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Burglar caught by cucumber

    During the raid, however, he couldn't resist sampling the home-grown produce and his DNA was later discovered on a cucumber.

    The honorary Recorder of Hull and the East Riding, Judge Michael Mettyear, declared in disbelief: "He was caught by a cucumber."

    is it standard practice in the UK to take DNA samples of all crimos?

  • tarran||

    In the UK, at one point, they were building a DNA database of everybody.

    Freedom has been dead in England for a very long time.

  • Drake||

    To be fair, England itself has been dead for quite a while.

  • cavalier973||

    To be fair, England Airstrip One itself has been dead for quite a while.

  • Lord Humungus||

    USA TODAY:

    Exchange launch turns into inexcusable mess: Our view

    Over the first four days the new online health insurance exchanges were open last week, more than 8 million people visited them, according to the Obama administration. At the very least, this casts doubt on the Republican claim that Americans hate Obamacare and want it repealed. It seems millions of people desperately want the coverage the law will allow them to get, regardless of their medical histories.

    Alas, the administration managed to turn the experience for most of those visitors into a nightmare. Websites crashed, refused to load, or offered bizarre and incomprehensible choices. Even though the system was shut down for repairs over the weekend, Monday's early reports continued to suggest an epic screw-up.

    Why have things gone so wrong?
  • John||

    It is almost as if the government is really bad at doing such things. You could have seen that coming?

  • Restoras||

    Certainly nothing in the past experience of government would have predicted this.

  • gaijin||

    At the very least, this casts doubt on the Republican claim that Americans hate Obamacare and want it repealed.

    No, it doesn't.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Right, Americans signing up for something they are legally required to means that they agree. What a bunch of assholes.

  • Lady Bertrum||

    They assume high visit counts means everyone wants to sign-up. How many of those visits were curiosity inspired?

  • Drake||

    Who doesn't want to glimpse the lower levels of Hell without actually diving in?

    I'll check it out eventually - if only to make myself feel good about the mere 25% increase in insurance costs during open enrollment.

  • Restoras||

    Funny, back in the dotcom bubble everyone was valueing companies based on eyeball. Didn't work out to well.

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -At the very least, this casts doubt on the Republican claim that Americans hate Obamacare and want it repealed.

    That is absurd for so many reasons. First, the number of people they are talking about is a small fraction of Americans. Secondly, even people who abhor Obamacare have visited the site (people that hate it are actually more likely to be aware of its legal requirements or to be curious as to how terrible the websites and what they offer are).

    This is straw clutching.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    This is straw clutching.

    But presented as ironclad fact. The modern media is nothing but a bunch of mendacious fucks. The MSM cannot die soon enough or suffer too gruesome a death.

  • GILMORE||

    Ah, leave it to the hard hitting editorial board of USA Today to tell it likt it is... fuck, at this rate, "Highlights" is going to do an investigative piece on Democratic cronyism with insurance companies...

  • sloopyinca||

    Cleveland Browns let down local cops one more time by telling them off-duty officers cannot pack heat at their stadium...you know, like the "civilians" attending games.

    PoliceOne reacts as expected.

  • Derpetologist||

    The FBI explains in great detail the techniques for weaseling information out of people:

    http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/in.....techniques

    No luck yet on finding tips from the IRS on how to cheat on your taxes, but I'm sure it's out there.

  • Restoras||

    That's easy - just stop working.

  • Derpetologist||

    It's not really cheating if you take advantage of the rules they make.

  • Restoras||

    While technically true to anyone with a modicum of logical thinking abilities, in the eyes of the government not getting the money it thinks it deserves is cheating it out of what is rightfully theirs...

  • Rich||

    Park Service OKs immigration reform rally on 'closed' National Mall

    the Park Service will allow the event to take place under the group's rights granted by the First Amendment. About 30 members of Congress are expected to attend the rally, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J.

    So, I suppose the First Amendment allows rallies in any closed public venue, then?

    Also, talk about "upholding the law", Pelosi and Menendez.

  • sloopyinca||

    Violent cop with violent history gets violent. Unfortunately for the officer, it was caught on video this time and he might possibly face criminal charges...after a months-long investigation by his own department and DA's office turned up nothing...until the video made it to the press and the mayor called on the DOJ and state AG to take over the investigation.

  • robc||

    Whats the saying?

    When you owe the bank $100k, they own you.
    When you owe the bank $100MM, you own them.

    China should realize which position they are in.

  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    When you owe the bank $100K, you have a problem. When you owe them $100M, they have a problem.

  • Drake||

    Unless you are Curt Shilling.

  • robc||

    Yeah, thats it. Thanks. I knew I was close.

  • WTF||

    China should realize which position they are in.

    Oh, I'm sure they do.

  • Restoras||

    They'll just take Japan as payment. Fine by me.

  • Lord Humungus||

    This is probably behind the WSJ paywall, but here is the story from Zero Hedge:

    NSA's Utah Spy Supercenter Crippled By Power Surges

    The first arc fault failure at the Utah plant was on Aug. 9, 2012, according to project documents. Since then, the center has had nine more failures, most recently on Sept. 25. Each incident caused as much as $100,000 in damage, according to a project official. It took six months for investigators to determine the causes of two of the failures. In the months that followed, the contractors employed more than 30 independent experts that conducted 160 tests over 50,000 man-hours, according to project documents.

    This summer, the Army Corps of Engineers dispatched its Tiger Team, officials said. In an initial report, the team said the cause of the failures remained unknown in all but two instances. The team said the government has incomplete information about the design of the electrical system that could pose new problems if settings need to change on circuit breakers. The report concluded that efforts to "fast track" the Utah project bypassed regular quality controls in design and construction.

    Tiger Team?

  • Drake||

    There used to be a real kick-ass armored unit called the "Tiger Brigade" - back when the enemy wasn't American civilians.

  • tarran||

    In the Navy during my time in, a Tiger Team was a team put together in an adhoc manner to tackle some problem, granted resources and authority that allowed them to fix the problem without much bureaucratic interference.

    Generally, the tiger team operates 24X7 until the problem is fixed.

  • Redmanfms||

    Huh. I never heard the term used, but I suppose only officers and very senior enlisted would have been assigned to one.

  • Lord Humungus||

    when I hear tiger team, I think of a bunch of cub scouts.

  • Lady Bertrum||

    +1 Orange kerchiefs

  • Rasilio||

    This is not a military term, it comes from the Business world and it is intended to be an independent collection of experts assigned to investigate of fix some specific problem

  • Jordan||

    The report concluded that efforts to "fast track" the Utah project bypassed regular quality controls in design and construction.

    Guess what would happen if a private company tried to pull this.

  • Redmanfms||

    Likely the writer's words and not the Army's.

    Here's the wiki definition.

    I've only ever heard the term used in the civilian world.

  • Brett L||

    Huh. The Tiger teams I dealt with inspected for code violations before we fried millions of dollars worth of equipment. And Gods help you if they found food in your lab.

  • DJF||

    Tiger Team, the military likes to use the term, I have seen it used everywhere from some experts trying to fix a computer system to a bunch of guys being assigned to clean a toilet.

    Freedom in America would be in real trouble if we could not count on government incompetence.

  • Loki||

    Tiger Team?

    You see the term a lot in engineering companies. It's more of a general term for when you stand up a team of experts to go off and solve a specific problem seperate from normal program engineering, and then disband once the specific problem is solved.

    The more interesting problem to me is how the hell did they build this facility with incomplete information about the electrical system? That's beyond DERP, even by government standards.

  • Rasilio||

    Revenge of Stuxnet

  • Troy muy grande boner||

    this makes me think that the NSA isn't as omniscient as people think.

  • ||

    http://moneymorning.com/ob-art.....t-oc-taxes

    Obama cares about the middle-class.

  • John||

    America is about to be hit by a big bus.

  • Restoras||

    Are you counting the bus that America has already been thrown under?

  • Jordan||

  • Rich||

    Parents were upset that kids were being encouraged to wear hoodies to school during the Trayvon Martin theme day.

    After getting numerous complaints, the school now says the theme has been cancelled ..., and Wednesday is now Bucco hat day.

    "Bucco hat day"? WTF?

  • John||

    Pirates.

  • Rich||

    Oh. Glad it's not hats made out of *cheeks*.

  • ||

    The 17-year-old’s shooting death let loose a firestorm of protests in February of 2012. Trayvon Martin was shot and killed by George Zimmerman in February 2012 in Sanford, Florida.

    No mention of self defense or that Zimmerman was found innocent.

    Also, I've personally found that voicing wrongthink about Zimmerman/Martin is one of the surest and shortest ways to piss people off and endanger future cocktail party invitations.

  • WTF||

    After getting numerous complaints, the school now says the theme has been cancelled ...,

    No word on whether they are also cancelling 'catch a cracker' day.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    After getting numerous complaints, the school now says the theme has been cancelled ..., and Wednesday is now Bucco hat day.

    I, for one, am glad to see our government school system focusing on the important things.

  • Derpetologist||

    Florida Man in hot water again- judge rules he must continue to pay child support for children that are not his:

    http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/07/.....index.html

    from the article:

    A Tampa court earlier this year disestablished him as father and relieved him of his future child support payments. But by law, he is unable to get back the $80,000 he already paid.

    Carnell Smith, who founded a group called U.S. Citizens Against Paternity Fraud, wants mandatory DNA tests when a child is born to avoid legal wrangling and anguish.

    "Unfortunately, today it's not a crime for someone to lie about which man is the father," Smith said. "The mother doesn't have to return the money and rarely, if ever, is she prosecuted for perjury, for fraud."

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    -But by law, he is unable to get back the $80,000 he already paid.

    If ever the phrase 'the law is an ass' seemed more warranted, I cannot recall it.

  • Derpetologist||

    You clearly have not heard of the shimmering beauty of lawmaking known as the Bradley Amendment:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bradley_Amendment

  • Bo Cara Esq.||

    What in the world, that is truly the most foolish law I have seen in a while.

  • KDN||

    Senator Bill Bradley, Democrat of New Jersey, introduced the amendment in an earlier bill on May 5, 1986. It passed in the Senate with amendments with an 88-7 yea-nay vote on September 20, 1986

    Bipartisanship in action.

  • Coeus||

    Bobby Sherrill, a Lockheed employee in Kuwait from North Carolina, was captured by Iraqis and spent nearly five months as an Iraqi hostage. Sherrill was arrested the night after his release for not paying $1,425 in child support while he was a hostage.[9][10][11][12]

    That greedy bastard.

  • Rasilio||

    I can understand why he could not get the money back from the mother. In reality the money was owed to the child by the father.

    The question is why could he not get the money back from the actual biological father?

  • WTF||

    But he didn't legitimately owe any money to the child, either. And since the mother was acting fraudulently on the child's behalf, he should be entitled to get his money back from the person committing the fraud (the mother).

  • Rasilio||

    He didn't owe the money to the child, but the money was owed, rather than trying to get it back from the child (via the mother) why couldn't he go after the person who actually was legally owed the debt?

  • Loki||

    China warned the US about a possible default

    What happened to you China, you used to be cool.

  • sarcasmic||

    Billionaire couple donate $10million to keep initiatives for poor families running despite government shutdown
    John and Laura Arnold have dipped into their personal $2.8 billion fortune
    They have stumped up the cash to keep seven Head Start centres open
    The donation means 7,000 youngsters will continue to receive care
    They had been left high and dry by the government shutdown


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....ilies.html
    Give it to a fucking private charity that actually helps fucking people, not some fucking government program! Fucking idiots!

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    John Arnold, known as the "King of Natural Gas", is a big Obama donor.

  • sarcasmic||

    Hmmm. I wonder if Obama's not allowing drilling on federal land is a benefit to this guy. Lower supply and less competition means bigger profits. Bootleggers and Baptists?

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Obama's not allowing drilling on federal land

    Quit listening to redneck AM radio, we are drilling our fool asses off on public and private land.

    Coal is the victim and the enemy.

  • Loki||

  • trshmnstr||

  • Loki||

    Not to mention the delays of the Keystone XL pipeline. Afterall, if I was the "King of Natural Gas" I'd certainly hate for Canadian shale oil to be easily and cheaply transported to refineries in the south and potentially compete with my natural gas. I'm guessing Mr. Arnold considers his Obama campaign donations money well spent.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    KXL tar oil is forced into Mid-West refineries thereby lowering the cost of finished product 10-15c a gallon there.

    Fuck TransCanada. We don't owe them a cheap route to the Gulf.

  • Root Boy||

    That's Buffet's rice bowl, since he owns the RR that ships the dirty, stinkin' oil now.

  • John||

    Yes. Obama loves his cronies.

    Go suck his cock somewhere else. No one here is ever going to like your hero.

  • Jam||

    he's a libertarian, started at Enron as the crack trader, left with millions before it blew up to start a hedge fund to make his billions, it's his wife is the lefty.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Or you can call him a liberaltarian - there are lots of us.

    Only on Hit&Run; are you required to vote GOP to be a "true libertarian".

  • Andrew S.||

    So, I know I shouldn't feed you, but I have a question.

    Have you ever read a single post here, or do you have some kind of bizarro-Reason that you read, where everyone loves the GOP?

  • sarcasmic||

    Have you ever read a single post here, or do you have some kind of bizarro-Reason that you read, where everyone loves the GOP?

    Criticism of Democrats equals love of the GOP. You should know that by now.

  • Jordan||

    You're asking a guy who thinks that "Tu Quoque" arguments are logical masterstrokes.

  • Rasilio||

    I'm not sure what his political leanings have to do with the argument that private charity would meet the needs of the truly needy

  • sarcasmic||

    Who a person is is more important than what the person does. You should know that.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Principals Principles in the world of TEAM politics.

  • Root Boy||

    Head Start has been proven multiple times to make no difference to poor kids. Yet everybody still thinks it's a godsend.

    Warehousing and feeding program for kids with shit head parents who can't raise their kids correctly.

  • Loki||

    Meh, it's their money, if they want to piss away on some ineffectual government program that's their problem.

  • sarcasmic||

    Gulf states to introduce medical testing on travellers to 'detect' gay people and stop them from entering the country


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....untry.html
    Er, what? Do they measure for loose sphincters? WTF?

  • Rich||

    Perhaps they use plethysmography.

  • waffles||

    They test if they talk like a fag and if their shits all retarded.

    Or maybe they wear brown shoes, black belts, and white socks to see if they notice the fashion crime.

  • sarcasmic||

    Carter: Middle class today resembles past's poor


    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/s.....7-23-47-05

    "The disparity between rich people and poor people in America has increased dramatically since when we started," he said. "The middle class has become more like poor people than they were 30 years ago. So I don't think it's getting any better."


    Today's poor watch cable television on flat screens, have internet, cell phones, and a host of other things no one had even heard of thirty years ago, but they're worse off because of inequality!
    Liberalism truly is the politics of envy.

  • John||

    Since when does inequity mean the same as poverty? What a joke. I remember the 70s. It was back when your mom ironed patches on your jeans because you couldn't afford to buy new ones and you rarely called anyone long distance. And I grew up in the middle of the middle class. We are so much more wealthy now. Fuck Carter rotten old bastard.

  • sarcasmic||

    Basically he's saying that the poor would be better off if they were poorer, as long the rich were also poorer. The logical conclusion of that is everyone living in poverty, but it would be happy poverty because there wouldn't be anyone to envy.

  • John||

    Yes. That is really evil when you think about it.

  • sarcasmic||

    When I think about it, it's even the little things. Like air conditioning. Everyone has air conditioners in their homes and cars. In the 70s those things were a luxury. Or VCRs. You had to rent them in the 80s because the machines cost so much money. Now they're obsolete. Yet the poor are worse off. Unreal.

  • From the Tundra||

    Imagine no possessions...

    I just heard that shitstain of a song on the radio. I always pictured Lennon laughing maniacally as he wrote it.

  • Zeb||

    I think Lennon knew that it was just a fantasy. It's just nice to imagine.

  • Brett L||

    It was probably nice to pick up a new royalty check that he wasn't splitting with McCartney, too.

  • Loki||

    I remember the 70s. It was back when your mom ironed patches on your jeans because you couldn't afford to buy new ones

    Fuck, I grew up in the 80s and likewise was not "poor" by any measure, and I still remember having jeans with patches over the knees and being embarrassed when I had to wear them to school. Most of the time I ended up just re-wearing a dirty pair of jeans rather than wear the patched ones.

    and you rarely called anyone long distance

    I also remember the old "collect call" trick. When you took a trip and wanted to call home to let them know you made it to your destination OK, you'd give one name for everything's fine, and the person would say "sorry, no one here by that name" and they'd know everything's fine and wouldn't have to pay for the call. Likewise you'd use a different name if you really did need to talk to them. All to avoid having to pay for a fucking phone call.

  • ||

    Haha, that brought back a few memories there. It's nice living in the distant future of the 21st century sometimes.

  • sarcasmic||

  • Andrew S.||

    That collect call message thing was... a thing? I thought I was so smart when I did it, that I figured out a trick that nobody else could. Dangit.

  • #||

    Damn, I remember doing that.

  • Gbob||

    My parents were both journalists. My Mom stayed at home for a number of years, but we were middle class. I remember being a kid in the seventies. There were any number of nights where we didn't have meat because it was out of the food budget for the week. This was considered to be pretty normal. Patches on jeans or on shirts were, as you mentioned, the norm. My parents couldn't afford a new car, let alone two. We had a small black and white television set and gas, when you could buy it (every other day depending on your license plate number, and assuming the station wasn't sold out), and most canned goods in the house were with yellow generic labels.

    This isn't a "I had to walk ten miles to school in the cold" kind of story. This was simply the reality of middle class life in that decade.

    Today even the poor kids have new designer sneakers. They have all manner of electronics, and you can eat like a king on what food stamps pay.

  • Rasilio||

    Nevermind the fact that the poorest welfare recipients in the US live lives that would be indistinguishable from the middle class in Europe

  • Steve G||

    "since when we started" ?
    Care to elaborate on who "we" is? and what exactly did you "start"?

    Or

    Perhaps this is a giant indication that the implied experiment you "started" failed miserably and it's time to change tactics.

  • sarcasmic||

    Undercover NYPD cop DID take part in savage Manhattan SUV attack claim sources as 4th biker is taken into custody


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....-part.html

    Sources have told the New York Post that the unnamed officer, who is a veteran of seven-years, initially told investigators he did not intervene because he arrived too late to stop the vicious beating.
    However, video footage unreleased by the NYPD apparently shows the exact opposite and the officer, who has already handed in his badge and gun is facing the wrath of the Internal Affairs Bureau.


    Note that the officer isn't in trouble for participating in the attack or lying about it. He's in trouble for not immediately telling his supervisors. They don't care what he did to little people, only that he didn't immediately tell the big people.

  • Troy muy grande boner||

    So there were like 6 of these pigs. These 6 pigs couldn't have gotten together to stop this? Oh, yeah they are under cover. What you want to bet these pigs are under cover for some lame shit like cigarette trafficing or child support enforcement?

  • Steve G||

    Were these guys "undercover" or "off-duty"??? I've heard so much conflicting info and the distinction is somewhat important.

  • sarcasmic||

    A very sweet 16! Bella Thorne rings in milestone birthday on the red carpet with sister Kaili at jeans event


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvs.....arpet.html
    They didn't look like that when I was 16.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    I like Zendaya, her co-"star" on Shake it Up Chicago, far more than Bella.

  • sarcasmic||

    'I was called pig and Shamu the whale': Depressed mother who weighs 616lbs finds new confidence as an obese pin-up girl


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/fem.....-girl.html
    John pron!

  • Rich||

    PSA: Do NOT click that link.

  • sarcasmic||

    Parents' outrage after high school Spanish teacher, 21, revealed as Playboy model
    Cristy Nicole Deweese posed naked for the magazine when she was 18 as a 'coed of the month'
    Miss Deweese teaches Spanish at Townview Magnet High School in Dallas


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....month.html

    'Are her male 16- and 17-year-old students looking at her without picturing her nude?


    Who doesn't?

    'And for the female students, is this someone they can respect as an educator, someone that they can look up to?'


    I dunno. Is she a good teacher?

  • Auric Demonocles||

    Just looking at the clothed picture they showed, they were going to be picturing her nude regardless of whether or not they found nude pictures of her. Now those mental images are just a bit more accurate.

  • Loki||

    If my HS Spanish had looked like that... I would have taken Spanish instead of French to satisfy my foreign language requirements.

  • sarcasmic||

    Revolutionary $35M airship damaged as the roof of its World War II era military hangar collapses
    The Aeroscraft is a prototype helium dirigible that developers hope will change the way the world ships its goods
    The Department of Defense and NASA have pumped $35 million into the project in the hopes it will become an indispensable military craft


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new.....apses.html

  • Bam!||

    I didn't know NASA was into steampunk.

  • DJF||

    The government has had at least a dozen airship projects after the Navy got rid of its airships in the 1950’s and all of them have failed

  • Bam!||

    But this is using modern helium, which is now lighter than air.

  • Brett L||

    Put out that light! Do you want to kill us all, goddammit?!

  • sarcasmic||

    In the past airships could only land where they could refill their helium. That made their use very limited.

    What makes this one unique is that it reuses its helium with on-board compressors, so it can land anywhere.

  • Guillotined||

    No Risk of Default via Economist Greg Mankiw

    My Harvard colleague Martin Feldstein writes me in an email:

    The WSJ and FT continue to write about the risk of default, quoting the Treasury, Boehner and others.There really is no need for a default on the debt even if the debt ceiling is not raised later this month. The US government collects enough in taxes each month to finance the interest on the debt, etc. The government may not be able to separate all accounts into "pay" and "no pay" groups but it can certainly identify the interest payments. An inability to borrow would have serious economic consequences if it lasted for any sustained period but it would not have to threaten our credit standing.

  • Rich||

    The time, ... or DEATH?

    *** glances at Tikker watch ***

    Gotta go!

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    Re the penaltax - if your insurance covers everything rxcept birth control, are you still taxed?

  • Auric Demonocles||

    I believe that a plan like that simply won't exist, or it's a supplemental plan which would not get you out of being penaltaxed by itself.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Coal miners suffer as U.S. production of natural gas increases

    The US has overtaken Russia as the #1 producer of oil/gas.

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18.....increases/

  • Brett L||

    There was an interesting article within the last year about the head of UMWA in the 1960s who basically committed himself to never letting another coal miner die underground in the US. He didn't quite succeed, basically his negotiating made coal so expensive, he helped kick off the domestic LNG boom.

    It was an interesting and nuanced article about someone who significantly lowered the number of jobs in his industry because he cared more about the lives of the workers.

  • Tonio||

    FU, PB. You never consider the coal miners when you talk about shutting down coal powered generating plants, yet you're all boo-hoo about them when it suits your purpose.

    Drown in your own crocodile tears.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    BEIJING (Reuters) - China will replace four coal-burning heating plants in the capital Beijing with natural gas fired ones by the end of next year as it steps up efforts to clean up pollution, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Saturday.

    http://news.yahoo.com/chinas-c.....IAZaTQtDMD

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Meanwhile they'll open another 40 coal burning plants in the same time frame.

  • #||

    Also China isn;t really interested in curtailing CO2, which is why westenr greenies hate Coal so much. In Chian's case they just burn so much coal in such an inefficient manner that conventional polution and coal dust is a huge problem.

  • John||

    I really hope the government stays closed until the Booker special election. The Dem get out the vote vote fraud organizations are generally funded by the federal government and are not getting their checks right now. If the government is closed for that special election, I will be very curious to see who under performs and over performs the polls. It will be sort of a controlled experiment on how much of an effect these sorts of organizations have on elections.

  • Bam!||

    I'm sure they'll declare those organizations to be in the 83% of the government that is essential and still open.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    You don't need to shill for the GOP here, doofus.

  • John||

    CRISTFAG!!

    Griefer troll is griefing. Go fuck yourself you little wierdo.

  • Gbob||

    Since unions are exempt from the "pain" of the shutdown, I'm sure they'll manage. You also have a state machine controlled by team blue that will do just fine busing in transients, hobos and whores to their nearest polling place.

  • Konima||

    Damn, I usually like watching Jon Stewart. He's obviously a democrat, but usually he is capable of maintaining some semblance of neutrality. However, he has been in full partisan mode since the government shut down. It's as unwatchable as Bill Maher right now.

  • ||

    There's a certain subcategory of my friends and family who I watched the Daily Show/Colbert Report with regularly when it was good (you know, Bush's reign of terror) and yet to this very day they just cannot understand why I don't want to watch it with them anymore.

    In their minds, absolutely nothing about it's changed. There's heavy crossover here with NPR listeners who claim there's no bias in its coverage--which, as someone who's listened to a fair bit of NPR myself, is the kind of thing I can only shake my head and laugh at.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    See my comment below. Jon hits both sides.

    He just doesn't parrot the wingnut lies you here on Fox News/AM radio - death panels, socialism, Kenyan, - you know, all the things that make conservatives in this country fucking brain dead idiots like John is.

  • sarcasmic||

    ...here...

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Jon hammered Kathleen Sibelius on the mandate inequity and the sorry ass rollout of the web site repeatedly. Seriously - he did not let up last night. She squirmed like a whore in church.

  • Konima||

    He will point out when the government really fucks something up on occasion. However, he fails to comprehend that inefficiency and bureaucracy is something innate with government. I might hold more disdain for Republicans than Democrats on most issues, and I am capable of recognizing that he is often very tendentious.

    Besides, he has already said that he's in favor of a single-payer system. He sees that the government can't even handle Obamacare, and yet he wants to give them even more control over healthcare? Irrational, non sequitur.

  • #||

    Also the website fuckups allow him to go after the dems without having to go after the core of the law.

  • Auric Demonocles||

    I posted about this last week when I happened to catch an episode. His entire response to clips of Republicans saying that Democrats refuse to negotiate was "bullshit".

  • Gbob||

    I think I stopped watching around the time The One was elected. At first I wondered if it was just me being partisan, but then I figured it out. What works on the show is when the make mockery of those in power. They did it to Clinton, and they sure as hell did it to Bush. I loved every minute, even if I disagreed with it.

    The problem in the past six years is that they decided to make fun of those not in power. When the jester makes fun of the King, it's funny. When the King makes fun of the peasants with the help of the jester, it's far less amusing.

    The vitriol of the attacks against concerned citizens who had the audacity to question such things as "is it right to tap journalists phones, spy on the American people and use the IRS as a political tool?" or "does the country need to spend over a quarter of it's net worth each year?" was petty and low. Just because somebody lives in "flyover country" or questions the government isn't a good enough reason to hold them up for ridicule.

    If folks find it funny, then great. I just can't watch it, myself.

  • Rich||

    Governor Bars State From Asking Job Applicants About Felony Records

    [Rep. LaShawn K. Ford (D-Chicago)] says he anticipates federal bank fraud charges against him –- unrelated to his service in the General Assembly -– being tossed out of court soon.

    Just what *is* it with Illinois? (And California? And Maryland? And Connecticut? ....)

  • John||

    That is a bad idea. I don't how you could ever bond anyone if you couldn't ask them about their criminal record.

    The real shame is that people are such assholes they refuse to give anyone a second chance. I understand you don't hire the check kiter to do your books. But everyone deserves a chance to do something.

  • Rich||

    I understand you don't hire the check kiter to do your books.

    Apparently you do *not* understand.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    Local media is calling the murder of that woman on Capitol Hill last week "last week's fatal shooting" and comparing it to the Navy Yard shooting (as in, comparing the victim from the Capitol Hill incident to Aaron Alexis). No mention that the cops did the shooting & murdering on the Hill.

  • John||

    The women was clearly nuts. But I have yet to hear why they had to shoot her. Sure she was ramming the barricades. But that is why you have the barricades. She wasn't a danger to get through them.

  • Rich||

    "She was using her car as a lethal weapon" is the reason I've heard.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    Not to mention they fired zod knows how many shots in the open in public in broad daylight with 100s of workers and tourists around. I thought police derpartments had policies to break off chases if there was a danger to the public. I also heard that they shot her as she was bailing out of the car, so not sure how, at that point, the car would have been a "lethal weapon".

  • John||

    That is the real scandal. They put a lot of people in danger.

  • robc||

    Ditto in NYC at the Empire State shooting.

    And nothing else happened.

  • Loki||

    Officer Safety uber alles. As soon as the "shots fired" call went out over the radio, and it was reported that she had alledgedly attempted to hit a cop, her life was forfeit. If a few proles accidentally get gunned down in the process, so be it. /cop-DERP

  • Whahappan?||

    If I'm not mistaken said "ramming" was of movable barricades pushed in her path, not stationary barricades that she deliberately targeted.

  • sarcasmic||

    But I have yet to hear why they had to shoot her.

    She disobeyed a "lawful command." That carries a death sentence these days.

  • tarran||

    I suspect that two things factored into the shooting:

    1) The cops are frequently warned to be on the look out for terrorist attacks and assasination attempts. So they are biased to see any transgression as the beginning of a serious attack. I seem to recall that you, John, had a great comment on this effect that I cannot find.

    2) The cops thought they were executing a cop-wounder. The people who shot her heard on their radio (a) "shots fired" and (b) "officer down" and assumed she had been shooting and injured/killed a cop. That's a death sentence; cops piss themselves in panic or go into full terminator mode at the hint of a little person laying a finger on them.

    Everything I have seen is consistent with the cops
    1) Trying to control her after she came to her attention
    2) Using an over the top escalation (shooting at her when she initially fled), triggering the street barriers
    3) Misusing their comms (again the cop injured in the car crash had no warning the barricades were about to be deployed) (the reports of shots fired and officer down provided no context)
    4) Executing a person whom they had categorized as a cop killer

    In the end, this was yet another situation where the police escalated what was at most a misdemeanor and escalated it until someone died. And are being praised for their courage in doing so.

  • sarcasmic||

    The cops thought they were executing a cop-wounder.

    I think you nailed it right there. The moment "shots fired" and "officer down" went over the radio, her death sentence was sealed.

  • AlmightyJB||

  • Brett L||

    Is AP the collateral guarantee?

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    If they do unload a majority stake in the team, they'll have to split the profits with the public.

    Never mind that the public should have never been made to pay for this boondoggle in the first place. And look at the shitass team they're getting for their money. Yet another revolving door of QBs. I don't think they've had a long-term "franchise" QB since Fran Tarkenton.

  • From the Tundra||

    We've had plenty of *other* teams' franchise QBs. You would have loved the press conference yesterday when both the coach and gm said that Ponder is still the number one guy.

    This should make some people feel better about their team:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L.....arterbacks

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    You would have loved the press conference yesterday when both the coach and gm said that Ponder is still the number one guy.

    WTF?

    Meanwhile their official Facebook page is just one Freeman post after another.

  • From the Tundra||

    Shit, after the Steelers game, AP all but deified Cassel. Ponder is toast. I wonder if Buffalo or Oakland would take him...

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    Are they trying not to hurt Ponder's feelings, or is he so dumb he doesn't realize that them bringing in a vet last year and a trade-in last week doesn't look good for him?

  • From the Tundra||

    They have treated Ponder like a fragile snowflake from day one. I really feel like it's just dawning on him today that he is fucked.

    I think Vikings management has been contracting with D.C. communications consultants. It reminds me of when some stoolie in government gets a vote of confidence from the president, he/she is not long for the job. Then there is the inevitable media questions about the person's character.

    Yesterday on the local sports radio, they were talking about how great QBs are workaholics, practically living at the practice facility. They were basically suggesting that Ponder just punches the clock.

  • Rasilio||

    4 years, 11 million and a nice post football career as a sportscaster or something similar.

    I wish I was as fucked as he is

  • Brett L||

    I will say that Ponder played the hand God dealt him to the best of his ability. He isn't a pro QB, but managed to get a smoking hot wife with a decent job and several millions of dollars out of being good at taking 4 steps backwards and handing the ball to AP.

  • Rasilio||

    I don't know, the Culpepper era wasn't that bad.

    He was the starter for 5 full seasons and into a 6th before he got injured and he went to 3 pro bowls in that time and had a QB rating above 95 for 3 of those 5 years and was the best QB in the league for one of them.

  • Andrew S.||

    Unsaid in that article: How thoroughly the stadium deal screwed Minnesota taxpayers.

  • robc||

    At a quick glance, less than Cincy and Louisville got screwed in their recent stadium deals.

    I cant figure out who got screwed worse in those deals, but I think they are the runaway leaders.

  • From the Tundra||

    Sure, but just think of the jerbz and the new restaurants and the urban renewal and the destination and the concerts and the taxes.

    Just don't ask about e-pull tabs. That's bad.

  • From the Tundra||

    Sure, but just think of the jerbz and the new restaurants and the urban renewal and the destination and the concerts and the taxes.

    Just don't ask about e-pull tabs. That's bad.

  • Andrew S.||

    Are those the things that were supposed to pay for the stadium, except instead of the expected $35 million(?) in revenue last year they brought in zero?

  • From the Tundra||

    Worse. I believe they were slightly in the red. We are truly blessed with a magnificent governor and legislature.

    Top. Men.

  • BakedPenguin||

    The article omits the most important news on the Vikings - that I was able to win my FF game despite Peterson being on bye week.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    Arthur Blank (Falcons owner and Home Depot co-founder) has some bad timing on his new stadium deal since the Falcons are stinking it up on their way to a 5-11 season.

  • Cascadian Ephor Xenocles||

    "...Home Depot co-founder..."

    He should just build it himself.

  • Jordan||

    Not possible, according to Obama and Elizabeth Warren.

  • Andrew S.||

    The owner of the Miami Dolphins tried (and failed) to get $250 million of public money to renovate the stadium. He said he couldn't afford to do it himself.

    He then turned around and donated $200 million to his alma mater (the University of Michigan).

  • KDN||

    For the 350-plus days the Vikings aren't playing, the stadium can be used for a range of events - from rock concerts to fantasy football days to amateur sports competitions to political conventions. But not everything goes: There'll be no events that sell guns, adults-only entertainment and periodicals, pawn-style offerings or head shop paraphernalia.

    Fitting, considering that the plans look like a church.

  • PD Scott||

    That's what I get for not refreshing.

  • PD Scott||

    Found this near the bottom.
    STADIUM NO-NOs

    For the 350-plus days the Vikings aren't playing, the stadium can be used for a range of events - from rock concerts to fantasy football days to amateur sports competitions to political conventions. But not everything goes: There'll be no events that sell guns, adults-only entertainment and periodicals, pawn-style offerings or head shop paraphernalia.

    I didn't want to go in their crummy stadium anyway.

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    Lost Dr. Who episodes discovered, fan nerdgasms expected:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ente.....s-24448063

  • cavalier973||

    "Dr." Who? "DR." Who?

    Freak.

  • Coeus||

    Skeptic feminists prove that they actually know what the word means, don't care.

    ACA edition:

    Well, I think the House Republicans are really onto something here. We, as skeptics, should really be skeptical of Obamacare! Like this lady, for instance. Quote Stacie Smeal: “In general, I don’t need health care. I exercise and eat healthy, so I’m generally a healthy person.”

    Wow! What a great outlook! The 27 year old fitness entrepreneur said the Affordable Care Act “disgusts” her. You know, the same thing that gives women free preventative medicine, and that allows young people to stay on their parents’ insurance plans until they’re 26, and that prevents insurance companies from discriminating against people for preexisting conditions, and that dictates that insurance companies must spend 85% of premiums on health care…you know, that thing. It disgusts her.
  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    The Skeptic Movement just replaced God with Blue Governance.

  • sarcasmic||

    Just?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    To mean "simply", not "recently"

  • Zeb||

    Just as in "only", not as in "recently".

  • Coeus||

    mrmisconception October 7, 2013, 3:23 pm
    Those are some interesting predictions there Nostradamus, but let me ask you, did the Bush tax cuts create jobs? Did the bailout of GM get paid back? Did the stimulus actually hurt the economy?

    I ask because the same sources you are using to make these backward predictions also predicted all of these things, incorrectly. This is the reason I don’t like “debating” libertarians, they make assertions that are backed up only by the think-tanks that push their same agenda, then when the failures of said policies are pointed out in becomes all tu quoque arguments and selfish justifications.

    Keep on believing you are right, in 5-10 years when Obamacare is highly popular (and the rest of your predictions are laughably backward) and there is a push to expand it try to remember this time and maybe, just maybe be humble enough to admit to yourself that you were wrong.

    There are no words.

  • Derpetologist||

  • Derpetologist||

  • John||

    They have their narrative, and then believe whatever facts fit it. They are in what amounts to an intellectual prison.

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    The lone voice in there was throwing pearls before swine. I mean, this "mrmisconception" still believes the IRS wasn't targeting Tea Party Groups for zod's sake. If that's not an article of faith in contravention of the evidence, I don't know what is.

  • John||

    I don't understand that one. Lois Lener took the 5th. What do thing she was taking the 5th about?

  • Neoliberal Kochtopus||

    ***puts Derp Hat On***

    Because the Teahadists would find an excuse to make her the villain no matter how valiant of a job she was actually doing.

  • Derpetologist||

    If only some state, perhaps in the northeast, had implemented this program, we'd know what the effects would be...

  • creech||

    It should disgust any proggie because it doesn't go far enough. Kids should be allowed to stay on the parents policy until at least age 40, all medicine for women should be free, insurance companies should be spending 100% of their premiums on health care, and people with pre-existing conditions should actually be given money from the rich in order to show compassion for their condition. Blame the damned teathuglicans for not making Obamacare even more compassionate!

  • cavalier973||

    miserlyoldman just had a weird experience, I'm sure, when he saw my hand reach out of his computer screen and slap him for this comment:

    "...even middle middle class people will get cheaper care from the competition."

    Because we don't have competition in the free market unless the government makes it happen, right? Right??

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    This is from last month, was it covered before?

    "Charges against an Ellicott City [Maryland] man who was arrested after speaking out at a public meeting on new national education standards known as the Common Core were dropped Monday by the Baltimore County state's attorney.

    ""It was clear that Mr. Small violated the rules of the meeting and disrupted the meeting," State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger said. "It was also clear that the officer acted appropriately and did have probable cause to make an arrest on both charges."

    ""In the interest of justice, further prosecution will not accomplish anything more," Shellenberger said. "Therefore, the charges have been dismissed.""

    The prosecutor didn't say Small was actually guilty of assaulting a policeman - a telling omission. Just that the cop can't be sued.

    School officials realize their error - they simply haven't explained the wonders of the Common Core adequately:

    "Baltimore County Schools Superintendent Dallas Dance Monday afternoon released a statement saying the "meeting helped us realize that we must do a better job of communicating what the Common Core is and what it is not.""

    http://ellicottcity.patch.com/.....re-meeting

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Local media is calling the murder of that woman on Capitol Hill last week "last week's fatal shooting" and comparing it to the Navy Yard shooting (as in, comparing the victim from the Capitol Hill incident to Aaron Alexis). No mention that the cops did the shooting & murdering on the Hill.

    SHE TRIED TO KILL THE PRESIDENT!

    I am surprised at how completely uninterested people seem to be in that story. She got what she deserved, I guess.

  • John||

    It is because it turned out that she was mentally ill. People are incredibly unsympathetic to the mentally ill.

  • Brett L||

    Well, they've accused her of being mentally ill. I'm not following that closely, but she was a pretty high functioning crazy.

  • sarcasmic||

    they've accused her of being mentally ill

    Dehumanize her so her murder isn't a loss.

  • cavalier973||

    What's worse is that she was, apparently, a fairly poor driver. She couldn't even get around a barrier that someone was pulling into her path without hitting the barrier and the person manhandling it.

  • Coeus||

    More black girl representation in comics.

    When she was done, I thanked her, but as I turned to leave, she stopped me. Her eyes nervously darted between meeting my gaze and staring at the ground as she told me, in an almost hurried, whispered tone that she didn’t know black girls were “allowed” to cosplay, that she hardly knew any black female superheroes, and that she had no idea “people like us” could join in on things like comic books, cosplay and conventions.

    Listening to her, my heart stopped –- for once, I was at a loss for words. Because 13 years ago, I probably would have said the same thing. I want better representation for women of color in comics, video games, movies and cartoons for many reasons -– but mostly, I want it for that girl.

    This misconception is apparently the (white) cosplayers fault, and not the result of being raised in a culture that actually does exclude other races.

  • cavalier973||

    OT: President Obama works surreptitiously to stop same-sex marriage.

  • Kaptious Kristen||

    Isn't it policies similar to this that keeps people in socialist "utopias" like Sweden from marrying? European friends tell me nobody gets married anymore over there.

  • Derpetologist||

    If you want to have fun, inform a prog that Sweden has a lower per capita income than Mississippi.

  • #||

    Generally speaking if the EU were a state, it would rank 49th in income. Only Mississippi and West Virginia would be lower.

  • Protagoronus||

    I am seeing Sweden at $40,130 (2010 GNI/capita data.worldbank.org) vs. Mississippi at $19,977 (Income/Capita 2010 census - Wikipedia.org)

    Sweden has been moving toward a more free economy and it is possible there are some larger issues at work in Mississippi.

  • Derpetologist||

  • KDN||

    So, just another Tuesday?

  • sarcasmic||

    Wow. That's pretty retarded.

  • mad libertarian guy||

    Dogs are awesome.

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