A.M. Links: Chavez Re-Elected, East Asian GDP Projections Cut, State Department Removed Security Personnel From Libya Despite Pleas For More, SpaceX Ship On Its Way To ISS, Nobel Prize For Physiology or Medicine Announced

  • Hugo Chavez claimed victory after winning 54 percent of the vote in Venezuela’s presidential election. Looks like the march to “democratic socialism” will be going on for a few more years. 
  • The GDP projections for East Asia and the Pacific have been cut by the World Bank citing fears of China’s economic performance.
  • The State Department removed up to 34 security personnel from Libya months before the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi despite pleas from the head of the Special Forces "Site Security Team" at the time for more security. 
  • A SpaceX cargo ship is on its way to the International Space Station in the first of a dozen planned supply runs.
  • The 2012 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Sir John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for their work in cell development. No word on the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel committee set its bar high with Obama on that one didn’t they?

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Hugo Chavez claimed victory after winning 54 percent of the vote in Venezuela’s presidential election.

    I hope Carter was there to give it the U.S. stamp of approval.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Turkey is sending reinforcements to the Syrian border after recent military exchanges with Syrian government forces.

    NO ONE CARES. But what did Mitt misspeak about the situation?

  • wareagle||

    perhaps Mitt pointed out that Assad is not quite the reformer Hillary claimed him to be.

  • Chris Mallory||

    Al Qaeda on one side and Lincoln on the other. Maybe they can both lose.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    I care!

    Syria has awoken the Turk. After they finish with Syria, we'll have Janissaries marching through the streets of Manhattan on their way to celebrate the construction of an neo-Ottoman mega-mosque at Ground Zero!

  • LTC(ret) John||

    If it was truly Ottoman, they would seize a Greek Orthodox church and convert it!

  • Fluffy||

    The best part of that process is when they tear out all the Greek icons and replace them with random line patterns.

  • Mike M.||

    The Janissary is one of my favorite units in Civilization. Love those guys!

  • R C Dean||

    Personally, I think its more likely that the rebels are the ones lobbing the odd shell into Syria. They have a heavy presence along the border and are the ones that stand to benefit.

  • R C Dean||

    Make that "into Turkey".

  • Bardas Phocas||

    So you're ready to slander the Rebel Alliance with no evidence? Why couldn't it be the Empire missing the mark?

    You would prefer another target, a military target? Then name the system! I grow tired of asking this so it will be the last time: *Where* is the rebel base?

  • R C Dean||

    I'm just wondering "cui bono", that's all.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    Charming to the last.

  • PapayaSF||

    This is plausible. The "shelling" has been (AFAIK) one shell at a time, and the rebel units are certainly not under tight central control.

  • DRM||

    And the rebels shot down that Turkish plane a while back, and somehow Jedi mind-tricked Syria into loudly announcing it did it?

    No, the Syrian government has proven its willingness to provoke Turkey well enough that no conspiracies are necessary to explain the shelling.

  • PapayaSF||

    The fact that Syrian government forces shot down the Turkish plane does not prove that Syrian government forces are responsible for the shelling.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    The Nobel committee might as well award the Peace Prize to Honey Boo Boo Child. I don't think Alana has killed anybody yet, unlike the current president.

  • RBS||

    I was thinking Chavez, as an end of life/going away present.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    I think they would have him join Kruggie in the economics field. MOAR SPENDING!

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    A SpaceX cargo ship is on its way to the International Space Station in the first of a dozen planned supply runs.

    Celebrate the big, fat government contract, boys.

  • Not an Economist||

    Not bad considering they had a stage one engine blow up.

  • db||

    I think "blow up" is a bit extreme. It was shut down by the flight computers due to an anomaly of some sort in its operation. Do you have more information?

  • db||

    OK, so I guess it did blow up. Wow. Turbopump failure?

  • Atanarjuat||

  • Atanarjuat||

    ...And amazingly, still made it to orbit. As Elon Musk said,

    “As designed, the flight computer then recomputed a new ascent profile in realtime to reach the target orbit, which is why the burn times were a bit longer.”
  • Not an Economist||

    Actually, making it to orbit is not all that impressive. NASA has had engines shut down prematurely for years and still made it to orbit.

    What was impressive is an engine blew up and didn't take the rocket with it. The other engines asorbed some damage and were robust enough to take it. (Although it is possible the engine fell apart rather than explode.)

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Hello? Did anyone hear the space alien language toward the end of the video? I smell a space rat.

  • Ice Nine||

    It was a lion named Laika.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    In space there is no smell...

  • db||

    That failure is reminiscent of a problem that occurred on one of the Shuttle launches in the late 90s or early 2000s. I think it was a launch of Columbia. The nozzle bell is made of hollow tubes that carry fuel to cool the nozzle and preheat the fuel. On the Shuttle flight, something came loose inside the engine and a piece of debris struck and damaged two or three cooling tubes, causing fuel to leak directly into the nozzle. This was visible on launch videos as a white hot light inside the nozzle. This looks very aimilar

  • DRM||

    They're also launching a private satellite on this same flight.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    http://www.suntimes.com/entert.....o-ono.html

    mindblownbr /
    Lady Gaga is awarded a peace prize.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    The late Christopher Hitchens shares the award...So, still more prestigious than the Nobel Peace Prize.

  • Ted S.||

    Every time I hear "Imagine no possessions", I imagine Yoko Ono not holding the IP rights to John Lennon's work and living in penury as a result.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    C Major is such a poor choice of key for a ballad to communism.

  • robc||

    It's part of a trilogy, a musical trilogy I'm working on in D minor which is the saddest of all keys, I find.

    /Tufnel

  • Caleb Turberville||

    Bob Dylan called C Major, "the key of strength, but also the key of regret." So, maybe it isn't inappropriate afterall.

  • Apple||

    But it's a great key for a ballad to racism, bypassing all the black keys.

  • Proprietist||

    Someone needs to make a Nazi punk mockumentary, stat.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The State Department removed up to 34 security personnel from Libya months before the attack on the American consulate in Benghazi despite pleas...

    Isn't this the same thing as removing Big Bird from Sesame Street despite pleas from PBS not to take away their advantage over entertainment competitors?

  • wareagle||

    this seems the early leader in the category of Most Under-reported Story. Why do you suppose that is?

  • RBS||

    This is all so retarded. Cutting funding to PBS means poor kids grow up dumb as shit and is pure evil, but an American ambassador is murdered after his security team was gutted and nobody cares.

  • Entropy Void||

    Maybe at the foreign policy townhall presidential debate, someone will ask how many more on Valerie Jarret's security detail than our Lybian Ambassador's ...

  • Not an Economist||

    Because they haven't figured out how to blame Mitt, the Republicans, or the libertarians.

  • Mo||

    The Obama administration should rightly getting hammered over pulling security out of Libya. However, this also demonstrates why the ratchet effect exists. No politician will ever cut the TSA or our military budget because of the public response if something bad happens.

  • Randian||

    Cutting security in a place where the government was recently overthrown is not the same as providing 30 union goons at the Des Moines airport.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Celebrate DEMOCRACY!

    HUGO

    HUGO

    HUGO!

  • ||

    Well, the people of Venezuela CHOOSE to live in a state of socialism. Good for them. How are they any different than Americans or the Europeans? Now, they deserve everything they get.

    Will of the people. Er...will of the stupid people.

  • robc||

    Only 54% of the people.

  • thom||

    54% of the ballots cast, as counted.

  • Zeb||

    "Now, they deserve everything they get."

    Even the 46% who voted against Chavez?

  • wareagle||

    especially them

  • Rich||

    "Deserve's got nothing to do with it."

  • ||

    I guess, that's what happens when you allow the ignorant to walk among you.

    Do you bear part of the blame, knowing that the stupid vote, and that their vote will affect your life, for not convincing them that your way is better?

    Seriously? I think it a legitimate question? And what are the alternatives?

    Yeah, yeah...constitutional republic... What happens when we clearly no longer follow the constitution and the majority votes away our freedoms?

  • cw||

    Other than force, there is no way to stop the stupid from voting. That's why republics never last.

  • aelhues||

    When we do? You mean like today?

  • T||

    I have an idea that will fix this problem for all time. A sort of final solution, if you will.

  • ||

    You know who else had a final solution?

  • Slithery D||

    Fermat?

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Flee!

  • Not an Economist||

    I wouldn't put it past Hugo to "adjust" the vote total to reflect the "real" will of the people.

  • Bee Tagger||

    Chavez does a great Mark Madsen impression.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The GDP projections for East Asia and the Pacific have been cut by the World Bank citing fears of China’s economic performance.

    So the Chinese economy really is a threat to match the U.S.

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    lol...wut?

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    Well, considering the economies of the U.S. and China are as connected as Chang and Eng, if one of us goes down, the other will as well.

  • Almanian's Evil Twin||

    On a brighter note, again, the Detroit Lions did NOT lose this weekend.

    /Bye Week

  • R C Dean||

    Neither did the 'Boys! Woot!

    On the downside, though, the Patriots won and the Packers lost. Again.

  • Fluffy||

    The best part of that game was the return of Poutin' Peyton when McGahee dropped that 4th down pass.

    Man, the look on that douche's face whenever a teammate makes a mistake is always priceless.

  • RBS||

    + 1 Manning Face

  • The Hammer||

    Jealousy is an ugly emotion, Fluffy.

  • hotsy totsy||

    I KNOW! Two asshole quarterbacks in a row.

  • DRM||

    Curse of Ford.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    re: picture

    Chavez at a political rally?

    or

    Chavez being crowned "King of the Bears" at the 2012 Caracas Pride Parade?

    You tell me!

  • LTC(ret) John||

    I vote the later.

  • hotsy totsy||

    Is there a difference?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    despite pleas from the head of the Special Forces "Site Security Team" at the time for more security.

    Every so often, the wolf really does come and eat the little shepherd boy.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Taliban mock US as Afghan war enters 12th year
    http://www.france24.com/en/201.....-12th-year

    America's longest war entered its 12th year Sunday, with the anniversary marked by a Taliban statement claiming that NATO forces are "fleeing Afghanistan" in "humiliation and disgrace".
  • Heroic Mulatto||

    I don't see what the Taliban is so puffed-up about. The Islamic conquest of Afghanistan took 228 years.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    And of the original Talib, I think only one (Mullah Omar) might still be alive. Maybe they made posthumous statements?

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    If by posthumous, you mean, "Sitting pretty in Pakistan, rolling around in piles of American jizya money", then yeah. ;)

  • LTC(ret) John||

    That is Taliban, The Next Generation.

    Fans will argue if they are better or worse than Taliban TOS.

    No word on their pizza preferences, however.

  • The Hammer||

    claiming that NATO forces are "fleeing Afghanistan" in "humiliation and disgrace".

    Are they trying to goad them into staying longer?

  • Lord Humungus||

    Romney surge post-debate overtakes Obama
    http://news.investors.com/poli.....debate.htm

    Based on his commanding debate performance, Republican Mitt Romney has erased President Obama's lead in the most recent days to pull into a tie among registered voters nationally in a brand-new Gallup Tracking Poll.

    Gallup's standard tracking poll uses a seven-day rolling average, in this case, the night of the debate and three nights on either side. Obama enjoyed a four- to six-point lead during the three days before the Oct. 3 Denver debate. But in the three days after, that lead evaporated into a dead heat at 47% each.

    wait, is Tony crying now or John? The Crying Game: Part II

  • ||

    What's the Democratic turnout fudge factor? D+19?

    I have a really hard time believing any of these polls. Of course I'm outta touch.

  • mr simple||

    So Mitt was right about the 47%?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    I imagine Yoko Ono not holding the IP rights to John Lennon's work and living in penury as a result.

    Balderdash.

    Yoko was/is a hugely talented artist in her own right.

    HUGELY.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    + 9

  • T||

    Well, yes, and that's why John Lennon married her. But as a musician, she's not very good.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Mexico's Cartels Increase Their Muscle In The U.S.
    http://news.investors.com/ibd-.....akness.htm

    According to a CBS News report, three of Mexico's cartels are fighting pitched battles in Chicago, and it's their turf wars that are driving its murder rate skyward in violence that shockingly resembles that of Juarez, Mexico.

    Chicago recorded 391 murders this year, a sharp 40% rise for the year, signaling even to laymen that there's a new thug on the block adapting easily to Chicago's hub geography, local gangs and entrenched culture of political corruption.

    "We know that the majority of the drugs here in Chicago, cartels are responsible for," DEA Special Agent in Charge Jack Riley told CBS. "We know the majority of murders are gang related. So it's very clear the connection and role."
  • LTC(ret) John||

    Chciago is already over 400...ugh.

  • hotsy totsy||

    Venezuela's prisons have already topped that. Pikers!

  • SugarFree||

    "We know that the majority of the drugs here in Chicago, cartels are responsible for," DEA Special Agent in Charge Jack Riley told CBS. "We know the majority of murders are gang related. So it's very clear the connection and role."

    "But we are completed mystified as to how to stop the cartels," Riley continued. "It's almost as if some policy in America is making it worth the violence and murders to make money with illegal drugs. It's a real head-scratcher."

  • ||

    There's something deeper than that though. There's the nonsensical belief that if the cartel's miraculously disappeared from the face of the earth tomorrow, that so would the flow of drugs into Chicago.

  • SugarFree||

    There is no demand for drugs, only a supply that people are compelled to consume.

    It's the same "logic" presented for Fast Food. If there were no fast food advertising or locations, all the demand for it goes away.

  • ant1sthenes||

    Of course, if the WoD ends tomorrow, the cartels will still exist. They'll just be starving wolves instead of normal wolves.

  • hotsy totsy||

    Also the nonsensical belief that illegal immigrants are responsible for the drug cartels, so if we just crack down on immigrants from Mexico, the gangs will just have to go back to where they belong!

  • wareagle||

    you would have thought after Prohibition... never mind; history is for losers.

  • SugarFree||

    "Drugs are different," stated Riley, while opening his fifth can of beer of the morning.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    Beer in the morning?! He would be on his second vodka, I think you mean.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Is America Man Enough to Vote?
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10.....html?_r=1

    The scientists reported that the male McCain voters “felt significantly more controlled, submissive, unhappy and unpleasant.” The testosterone effect was “as if they directly engaged head-to-head in a contest for dominance” and lost, one researcher told a reporter when the study was published in 2009. The men who voted for Obama fared better. The researchers speculated that there might be an Obama baby boom.

    Politicians mining the gender gap should pay close attention to the study. Women had no change in testosterone levels, regardless of whom they voted for. Estrogen was not measured in the study. And women return to the polls more frequently than men. (Indeed, female turnout has exceeded men’s in every presidential election since 1980.)

    Is it possible voting makes male voters too vulnerable? Could the unpleasant feelings male voters experience when their candidates lose discourage them from revisiting the polls? No wonder they stop voting. It hurts too much.
  • R C Dean||

    The researchers speculated that there might be an Obama baby boom.

    Abortion providers everywhere celebrate.

  • Randian||

    If you set someone up to provide the most stereotypical example of extreme Freudian indulgence, I doubt they could manufacture something this ridiculous.

  • wareagle||

    I find your lack of faith disturbing. These are "scientists", after all. There is no end to their drive to achieve peak retard.

  • Mike M.||

    It’s a truism among election reformers that poor turnout produces poor representation, which produces laws people are disinclined to obey and so undermines the process.

    So what explains why Europe is so highly functional and well-represented.

  • R C Dean||

    It’s a truism among election reformers that poor turnout produces poor representation,

    That's tautological enough, I suppose.

    which produces laws people are disinclined to obey and so undermines the process.

    Slow down there, reformer dude. Why would anyone believe (a) people elected in high-turnout elections won't pass laws in response to narrowly-based pressure groups (public choice, anyone?), or even that laws favored by 51% of the population won't leave the other 49% "disinclined to obey"?

  • cw||

    Because !DEMOCRACY!

    It's the end of all things, in more ways than one!

  • hotsy totsy||

    Well, 81% turnout in Venezuela! That should make them law abiding.

  • Zeb||

    I don't seem to have that problem. But generally when I vote, I expect my candidate to lose.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    Here in Illinois, when I am faced with a choice of herp vs derp (which tends to be, oh, every election) I generally vote against the incumbent. Making a difference, one vote at a time!

  • Trespassers W||

    Could the unpleasant feelings male voters experience when their candidates lose discourage them from revisiting the polls? No wonder they stop voting. It hurts too much.

    This also explains why men hate sports.

  • Rich||

    And sex.

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    Wait, what? Is there something wrong with you?

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Meanwhile, In California, people are apparently beginning to seriously ponder to causes of their uniquely high gasoline prices....

  • Atanarjuat||

    On NPR, some "regular guy on the street" was blaming it on oil companies executive bonuses.

  • wareagle||

    at what point does the interviewer make an editorial decision and say "some of the comments are too stupid to put on the air; let's just hang onto them for the company christmas party."

  • Zeb||

    You should have heard the ones they didn't air.

  • Atanarjuat||

    It was NPR; she probably agreed with him.

  • ||

    Did you listen to NPR at all while the whole debt ceiling brouhaha was going on? Trust me, there's nothing too idiotic as long as it's anti-capitalist.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    at what point does the interviewer make an editorial decision and say "some of the comments are too stupid to put on the air; let's just hang onto them for the company christmas party."

    When they are counter to proglodyte memes.

  • SugarFree||

    TRUST DEMOCRACY to ruin Venezuela.

    Such sad news for freedom... and on National Pierogi Day. Talk about adding insult to injury.

  • db||

    I saw a bumper sticker this morning that read "EAT RICE. Potatoes make your ass big."

    Absolute HERESY in pierogitown.

  • wareagle||

    because rice is full of low-carb carbs?

  • SugarFree||

    Western food is bad; Eastern food is good. And acupuncture cured my cancer.

  • SugarFree||

    Stone the heretic.

    One of my peak food experience was the Ukrainian National street festival in NYC we just stumbled upon. A dozen Ukrainian grandmothers making pierogi for me.

    Starch-stuffed starch. Oh, my.

  • NoVAHockey||

    welcome to my family reunions.

  • ||

    My grandmother made them by the hundred. Potato mostly, but sometimes stuffed with sauerkraut, cheese and even prunes.

    Nothing better in the world than pierogi fried in butter and onions.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Top designer labels abandon Argentina
    http://www.denverpost.com/brea.....z28foRtG1d

    The world's most luxurious designer brands are abandoning Argentina rather than comply with tight new government economic restrictions, leaving empty shelves and storefronts along the capital's elegant Alvear Avenue, where tourists once flocked to see the latest in fashion.

    Kenzo is the latest to go. The Japanese label's owner, Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy, issued a statement Tuesday blaming Argentina's "complex economic context" for the closure of its store on Oct. 10. Government trade restrictions kept Kenzo from importing its spring and summer clothing lines, store employee Stella Christianopol said.
  • wareagle||

    but I thought regulahsuns were necessary to keep the evil corporations from raping people. Was I lied to?

  • Calidissident||

    I visited Argentina in May on a trip through my university's business school, and so naturally we spent most of the days visiting various companies, meeting with executives and workers, etc and literally everywhere we went, they couldn't give a presentation without mentioning how awful the government's economic policies are. It's a shame, because it's an otherwise great country. Friendly people, beautiful women, nice architecture, lots of fun things to do, etc.

  • PapayaSF||

    Around the '20s-'30s they were one of the richest countries in the world. In the top 10. Then they got Peron....

  • Calidissident||

    I think it was even higher than that. I remember hearing they were the third or fourth wealthiest country in the world before populists took over. Argentinians are very educated, dress well, are cultured, etc. They're a first world people living in a second world country. And the sad thing is they keep electing the people holding them back! Then again, we keep electing the people taking us down that path

  • LTC(ret) John||

    "No word on the Nobel Peace Prize, which will be announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel committee set its bar high with Obama on that one didn’t they?"

    In a surprise move, a second prize is awrded to O! for meritorious droning!

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    For a period of several years, the Peace Prize was simply the Not Being Bush Prize. I don't know what the new criteria are.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    I fully expect a reinforcement of previous failure. Heading toward Peak Derp.

    Maybe a posthumous one for Che?

  • DRM||

    Posthumous prizes are explicitly prohibited by Nobel's will.

    Of course, said will also says the prize is supposed to go to the person who "shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses."

    So, sure, why not one for Che?

  • LTC(ret) John||

    No dead 'uns...OK, then the clear choice is Assad or Ahmedinijad.

  • PapayaSF||

    To be fair, they should give it to Romney.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Could the unpleasant feelings male voters experience when their candidates lose discourage them from revisiting the polls? No wonder they stop voting. It hurts too much.

    Or maybe it's self-loathing for allowing themselves to be suckered into a rigged and ultimately meaningless display of TEAM building.

  • Rich||

  • Lord Humungus||

    I read this and thought - how could this possibly even be enforced? Police are going to bust up garage sales? flea markets? Ebay? Craigslist?

  • SugarFree||

    Monitoring eBay and Craigslist make a fine excuse for the control of the Internet they've lusted after since it became more than a few math nerds trading jokes and low-res boob pics.

  • Lord Humungus||

    bring back ASCII nudity!

  • Coeus||

    8===) --- (.)(.)

    That doing anything for ya?

  • The Ghost of Picasso||

    fap fap fap fap

  • R C Dean||

    Holy fuck, that is appalling. And the appellate court ruled that it is illegal to resell something made overseas without the IP holders permission.

    If SCOTUS screws the pooch on this one by agreeing with the lower court, it will lock up the used car market, for starters.

  • Lord Humungus||

    Penaltax!

  • Not an Economist||

    You are not thinking clearly. Just think of the all the jobs the government will require to keep track of all the sales in the US to make sure the foreign IP holders get their money.

    And to track down and arrest all the black marketeers this will create.

  • Rich||

    Yep.

    And DRONES, Baby!

  • ||

    Our unemployment problems are solved.

  • ||

    I have zero familiarity with this case law. But I would suspect that it's rather complicated and ill-defined from a Constitutional perspective. So it wouldn't surprise me if SCOTUS upheld because they would likely have to "invent" a new commercial right to avoid reliance on the existing case law.

  • wareagle||

    it's rather complicated and ill-defined from a Constitutional perspective

    feature, no?

  • robc||

    I dont understand how the first sale doctrine changes if something is foreign made instead of US made.

    In both cases, the only reason the US acknowledges IP at all is due to the constitutional clause. There is nothing I see that suggests common law would be different based on source.

    Foreign IP either follows US common law in the US or it doesnt exist at all.

    That would be a loltastic ruling if the US Supremes overturned foreign held IP (Im sure we have treaties on it, so that wont happen, but it would be funny).

  • Fluffy||

    The difference is that the copyright law pretty clearly allows foreign copyright holders to restrict importation of their products into the US if they so choose.

    Basically this kid was acting as an importer. When he was sued, he attempted to defend his importation by asserting the First Sale doctrine.

    This sets up a conflict between two different sections of the copyright law that the court has to rule on.

    The danger is that if the court tries to salvage the importation restrictions by nibbling away at the First Sale doctrine (as the lower court did) it creates a host of potential problems, as everyone can see. But their other option (and I think the correct option) is to get rid of the import limits. But I really doubt they'll do that, because they'll view it as disruptive. So it's hard to know which way they'll go.

  • Fluffy||

    Now that I think about it, the way to square the circle would be to say that this kid violated copyright not when he sold the goods in the US, but when he carried the books across the border (or arranged to have them shipped across the border in defiance of copyright).

    That would put all property owners who bought goods inside the US in the clear, while leaving the import restrictions in place.

  • robc||

    Now that I think about it, the way to square the circle would be to say that this kid violated copyright not when he sold the goods in the US, but when he carried the books across the border (or arranged to have them shipped across the border in defiance of copyright).

    That is a shorter version that what I wrote below.

  • R C Dean||

    the way to square the circle would be to say that this kid violated copyright not when he sold the goods in the US, but when he carried the books across the border

    Let's say he acquired title in Thailand, and shipped books he owned into the US. That's legal, right? Lots of people buy books overseas and bring them home.

    And he resold books he owned in the US. The first sale doctrine says that's legal, too.

    Absent a (explicit?) prohibition on importing copyrighted material with the intent to resell, I don't see a case here.

  • robc||

    Was he selling directly from Thailand or was he importing to himself first, and then selling on?

    Because if the latter, he was dodged that importer bit, whoever sold to him was acting as the importer.

    It is nit picking, but an important nit.

    I can give an example in an industry Im more familiar with. The local distributor for Mikkeller beers is a small start-up. They arent the importer, however, that is Shelton Bros.

    The beer goes from Europe-Shelton-Distributor-bar-my belly.

    This ruling would say the distributor and bar couldnt sell the beer on without first getting permission from Mikkeller. But, once Shelton imported it, Mikkeller doesnt have control under First Sale any more.

    In this case, Im thinking he is the distributor. His family sending him the books is the importer.

  • thom||

    I would love to see the Supreme Court rule that Americans could no longer re-sell a car made abroad without manufacturer permission. That might be the actual straw that broke the camels back.

  • robc||

    For example, it could become an incentive for manufacturers to have everything produced overseas because they would be able to control every resale.

    I could see this going the other way too...as people buy only 100% American created goods. It would be a selling point for the manufactureer..."resell this good legally!"

  • db||

    This seems like a dirty way of trying to implement "buy American" policies without tarriffs. What about automobiles?

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    When I was a college student, I used to buy school books from amazon all the time from these far flung regions where textbook sellers couldn't charge as much (because their market would evaporate overnight). Americans are assumed to be the subsidizers for the rest of the world textbook market since our schools mandate the books. Its absurd. But in any case, if the case does end up being taken by the supreme court, i believe any ruling would be very narrow and probably along the lines of what fluffy described below. There is no way they will come out with a broad ruling against general resale.

  • Generic Stranger||

    Holy shit that's a badly written article. No, they won't be able to stop you from reselling anything and everything; there'd need to be some IP holder involved in order to queer the deal, and there likely wouldn't be one for "antique furniture" or "family jewels" or random crap you have lying around.

    Also, the kid made $1.2 million reselling books, which suggests that he was importing them regularly and reselling them for profit, rather than just ditching texts he didn't need anymore. Which is not what the article leads you to believe.

    The kid definitely still deserves to win, but that article does him a disservice. After all, if they lie or dissemble about shit like the above, what else are they fudging?

  • SugarFree||

    Pizza Wars Go International: Weird Pizzas Around The World

    Japan: This Pizza Hut ad boasts a pizza topped with hamburger, edamame, corn and more, surrounded by a wiener-stuffed roll crust that is meant to be topped with a "fruity ketchup."

  • RBS||

    I can't decided what part of that Japanese abomination is more horrifying. Probably the corn.

  • SugarFree||

    IIRC, Okinawa-style ramen features corn and butter.

    Although the Korean one with the mayonnaise seems like a natural extension of the Japanese dish okonomiyaki.

  • Proprietist||

    Okonomiyaki is one of my all time favorites (as well as Takoyaki). Kansai dishes really need to get more promotion in America.

  • sloopyinca||

    Well, it is still a Pizza Hut, so I'm gonna go with the sauce.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    fruity ketchup

    Proof that the Devil is active in the world.

  • sloopyinca||

    Technically, all Catsup is "fruity" by definition.

    /pedant

  • LTC(ret) John||

    /throws tomato

  • ||

    Apparently curry-flavored lemonade is a thing in Japan. I'm simultaneously horrified and intrigued by it.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    Curry is goodness, but in lemonade? I am leaning toward horrified.

  • Eduard van Haalen||

    If it were any worse of an abomination, it would be crawling on its tentacles in search of schoolgirls.

  • Fatty Bolger||

    Hot dogs, hamburgers, corn, and ketchup - I assume this is supposed to be some sort of "American style" pizza?

  • Proprietist||

    Japanese pizza sucks in general - the most common pizza has mayonnaise and corn.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    http://www.cnn.com/video/?hpt=.....course.cnn

    Jon Stewart and Bill O'Reilly apparently staged some sort of publicity event disguised as a debate.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    Actually, the even was "moderated" by ED Hill, so I'll give Stewart credit for not being afraid of interacting with Fox News personalities. (Though, I suppose a good majority of the audience was on Stewart's side.)

  • Caleb Turberville||

    *event

  • wareagle||

    Stewart may be a moron but he seems to genuinely believe his own bullshit. O'Reilly is just a phony.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    That's what I gathered from the highlights too.

    Stewart, for better or for worse, came off as sincere. And sincerity goes a long way to pursuading an uninformed and credulous audience that you are correct.

    O'Reilly came off as unprepared, setting up easy "gotchyas" for Stewart. O'Reilly's attempted comebacks seemed awkward, making Stewart's job (namely, to do live version of his show) easier.

  • Mike M.||

    I will give Stewart some credit in that he is at least honest and self-aware enough to recognize and acknowledge that he has done very well for himself using O'Reilly as his primary comedic foil for the last decade.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    Again, O'Reilly doesn't care. He has a new book out, and he needed the publicity.

  • R C Dean||

    Jon Stewart and Bill O'Reilly apparently staged some sort of publicity event disguised as a debate.

    Not to be confused with the candidates staging a publicity event, etc.

  • Caleb Turberville||

    http://entertainment.nbcnews.c.....umble?lite

    “'Drones Yes, Waterboards No' (to point out the irony of it being chic to condemn water boarding but not to be outraged over bombings.)"

    Okay, so maybe O'Reilly did have one good point to make in the debate.

  • MJGreen||

    And O'Reilly comes out hard against the draft? What the fuck Stewart, you're making me think Bill O'Reilly is a better person!

  • The Late P Brooks||

    From the resale link:

    The case stems from Supap Kirtsaeng’s college experience. A native of Thailand, Kirtsaeng came to America in 1997 to study at Cornell University. When he discovered that his textbooks, produced by Wiley, were substantially cheaper to buy in Thailand than they were in Ithaca, N.Y., he rallied his Thai relatives to buy the books and ship them to him in the United States.

    He then sold them on eBay, making upward of $1.2 million, according to court documents.

    Wiley, which admitted that it charged less for books sold abroad than it did in the United States, sued him for copyright infringement. Kirtsaeng countered with the first-sale doctrine.

    So they want the Supreme Court to outlaw arbitrage?

    Awesome.

  • KDN||

    So they want the Supreme Court to outlaw arbitrage?

    I suspect that it's going to happen eventually anyway, and that in our next dark age only Jews will be allowed to practice it.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    And would this apply to medicine reimportation from Canada (a fav leftie Holy Grail here in IL)

    Stand by for wailing and gnashing of socailist teeth if this is decided "wrongly".

  • robc||

    Ive always thought that one could be solved by the US drug companies refused to give a discount to Canadia.

    Make them pay full price and problem solved. If they dont, dont ship them any drugs.

    If they violate patent treaties and try to get around the drug patents, burn Ottawa to the ground.

  • sloopyinca||

    If they violate patent treaties and try to get around the drug patents, burn Ottawa to the ground.

    FIFY!

  • LTC(ret) John||

    I'd rather burn London, Ontario - its not so long a drive/march.

    Same with the Europeans as Canada - US consumer subsidizing the RD that socialist weenies get to benefit by virtue of gov't price fixing.

  • robc||

    its not so long a drive/march.

    I figured we could do it be drone.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    What fun is that?! I assume we'd get a chance to pillage first - think of all that pea bacon, maple syrup and poutine!

  • robc||

    Same with the Europeans as Canada

    Agreed, but lets start with Canada. Once that one has been handled, we can move on to Europe.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    Agreed - I call dibs on Germany.

  • ||

    Jinx

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Make them pay full price and problem solved. If they dont, dont ship them any drugs.

    If they violate patent treaties and try to get around the drug patents, burn Ottawa to the ground.

    Yes, warfare to enforce government monopolies that enrich their cronies is totally libertarian.

  • LTC(ret) John||

    You have missed out on the recreational pillage opportunites!

  • Generic Stranger||

    Actually it's kind of the other way around. Canada, like many companies, puts a cap on what pharmaceuticals can charge for their products. This means that we in the US, which is one of the few countries not to cap prices, have to pay a lot more in order for the companies to be able to recoup their RD costs.

  • Generic Stranger||

    *Canada, like many countries...

  • Cytotoxic||

    If you don't believe in intellectual property rights, you don't believe in property rights, period.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Of course, banning (as much as possible) sales of "previously owned" merchandise is probably essential for implementing a successful VAT.

    Contemplate this, on the Tree of Woe:

    Heavily armed joint tactical squads composed of Consumer Protection and Patent Office agents raiding flea markets and garage sales.

  • db||

    It is part of the New Economic Patriotism. All sales must be government approved and are subject to review at any time. Keep your receipts, folks!

  • LTC(ret) John||

    "Contemplate this, on the Tree of Woe"

    Kudos for placing that one perfectly.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    The danger is that if the court tries to salvage the importation restrictions by nibbling away at the First Sale doctrine (as the lower court did) it creates a host of potential problems, as everyone can see. But their other option (and I think the correct option) is to get rid of the import limits. But I really doubt they'll do that, because they'll view it as disruptive. So it's hard to know which way they'll go.

    They could always void the price fixing arrangement.

    But that's just crazy talk.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    Technically, all Catsup is "fruity" by definition.

    Artisanal catsup, in particular?

  • LTC(ret) John||

    /waits for sloopy to explode in righteous anger

  • DJF||

    This is from last week but I have not seen it reported in the USA. Good work Bush and Obama after wasting thousands of US lives and billions of US dollars their policies have brought peace and military cooperation between Iraq and Iran.

    """"Iran and Iraq have signed an agreement of bilateral cooperation in the defense field.""'

    http://www.armyrecognition.com.....10123.html

  • Lost_In_Translation||

    realpolitik fail

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