BHL: France's National Disgrace

French "philosopher" Bernard Henri-Levy, the non-politician perhaps most responsible for getting NATO into war with Libya, has long been one of the West's most scarequote-worthy intellectuals. There was the quoting of a literary hoax to attack Immanuel Kant, the dubious reportage from the Russia-Georgia mini-war, the now-more-than-ever defense of Roman Polanski's "misdemeanor." And let us not forget the eating-at-home-is-"repugnant" boast, the Daniel Pearl appropriation that led Pearl's widow Marianne to describe BHL as "a man whose intelligence is destroyed by his own ego," and a self-appointment as successor to Tocqueville so brazenly impotent that even Garrison Keillor rose above his usual torpor to snarl that "There's no reason for it to exist in English, except as evidence that travel need not be broadening and one should be wary of books with Tocqueville in the title."

So there was never a question of whether this narcissist millionaire shirt-unbuttoner would manfully rise to the defense of his poor, underprivileged pal Dominique Strauss-Kahn, but just how thoroughly he would soil himself, his country, and his alleged professions in the course of the apologetics. Well, thanks to the editing genius of Tina Brown, we now have an answer.

Let's go straight to the victim-blaming:

I do not know—but, on the other hand, it would be nice to know, and without delay—how a chambermaid could have walked in alone, contrary to the habitual practice of most of New York's grand hotels of sending a "cleaning brigade" of two people, into the room of one of the most closely watched figures on the planet. [...]

I hold it against all those who complacently accept the account of this other young woman, this one French, who pretends to have been the victim of the same kind of attempted rape, who has shut up for eight years but, sensing the golden opportunity, whips out her old dossier and comes to flog it on television.

How about some special pleading for the accused, because of his elite status? Check:

I hold it against the American judge who, by delivering him to the crowd of photo hounds, pretended to take him for a subject of justice like any other. [...]

France [...] has counted him among her most devoted and competent servants for so many years.

And Europe, not to say the world, [...] is indebted to him for contributing, for the past four years at the head of the IMF, to avoiding the worst.

Stuff it, égalité! Can we have some spectacular misreadings of the U.S. criminal justice system, please?

I am troubled by a system of justice modestly termed "accusatory," meaning that anyone can come along and accuse another fellow of any crime—and it will be up to the accused to prove that the accusation is false and without basis in fact.

And since we don't want to reprint the whole quavering bag of apologia ("Charming, seductive, yes, certainly; a friend to women and, first of all, to his own woman, naturally," etc.), let's close with perhaps my favorite line:

What I do know is that nothing in the world can justify a man being thus thrown to the dogs.

I'm guessing what BHL really means here is that no worldly rape can justify Strauss-Kahn's treatment. Since if the accusations are true, a 62-year-old man known by every French person I've asked to have the sexual manners of a primate lunged nakedly at hired help half his age, grabbed her breast, knocked her to the floor, and chased her around his expensive hotel suite attempting with some success to thrust his penis into her body and discharge DNA evidence.

I don't know if he's guilty, and it would be imprudent not to consider the conspiracy theories in a case involving someone who until this week was the single biggest political threat to the sitting president of France, but the only decent way you can arrive at "nothing in the world can justify" Strauss-Kahn's treatment is if you oppose all perp walks equally. Short of that, it's just special pleading for a powerful dick. And another reminder that BHL is 10 times the national embarrassment to France than Jerry Lewis or even Johnny Hallyday ever was.

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  • ||

    How unfortunate that Jean Bart isn't here to share this day with us.

  • -||

    I don't know if he's guilty

    You don't? That's generous of you. Anyway, the man is hated here because his politics is hated. It has nothing to do with his alleged crime.

  • Mango Punch||

    Short of that, it's just special pleading for a powerful dick.


    I see what you did there.

  • sevo||

    "I do not know—but, on the other hand, it would be nice to know, and without delay—how a chambermaid could have walked in alone, contrary to the habitual practice of most of New York's grand hotels of sending a "cleaning brigade" of two people, into the room..."
    Is this true? I can't claim to have stayed at "New York's grand hotels", nor have I made a close count of the folks who clean the hotel rooms where I have stayed, but when I have seen hotel maids, they are typically one to a room.

    ..."of one of the most closely watched figures on the planet. [...]"
    Closely watched by whom?

  • ||

    Maids, godchildren, and aerobics instructors who value their orificial integrity, apparently.

  • ||

    Personally I wonder what Strauss-Kahn was still doing in his hotel room long past checkout time on the day of his flight.

    Granted I havn't stayed in any of New Yorks fanciest hotels, but even in a typical Holiday Inn, they expect you to be out of the room by noon at the very latest.

    My suspicion, given the other allegation, is that PERHAPS .... perhaps this guy has a "strategy" of intentionally staying late in a hotel room and assaulting the maid just before boarding a flight out of a country.

  • ||

    Given that the guy's job is based in the country he would be fleeing from, I don't know if that's such a great strategy.

  • ||

    I don't know how much time he spends in New York, especially if he spends it staying in $3,000/night hotels.

    He might only make trips to the US every few weeks. By that time, memories fade and cops lose interest.

  • ||

    By that time, memories fade and cops lose interest.

    If we were talking about parking in a handicap spot, I would agree. But attempted rape? Sorry, no.

    I did like the bit where the IMF claimed that he would have had immunity if he'd been on a business trip, but this was a personal trip.

  • ||

    Why not attempted rape?
    If the suspect leaves the country, the local cops have no way to collect evidence from him. They have to wait until he comes back, which might be a long time. And rapes are hard enough to prosecute as it is. If and when the suspect returns, would the victim be able to pick him out of a lineup?

  • ||

    We're talking about weeks here, not years. HIS JOB IS BASED IN WASHINGTON. Need I repeat? He can't stay away indefinitely like Polanski.

  • ||

    And when he returned he'd be under diplomatic immunity. And in a different jurisdiction.

  • Xenocles||

    I'm not so sure here; if enough complaints surfaced it wouldn't be too unreasonable to expect the State Department to expel him.

  • ||

    1. Diplomatic immunity only shields you if it is in force at the time the crime is committed, not later times when you could be arrested for it. Otherwise France could just send Polanski to Hollywood as a diplomat to accept his awards.

    And I'm pretty sure DC would extradite him to NYC with no problems, as they do with many criminals per year, no doubt.

  • ||

    Wouldn't that require them to have more evidence than the word of one maid in a hotel? Extradition is for having enough evidence to charge someone, not for taking someone in for questioning.

  • Parah Salin||

    This was not true in Assange's case.

  • Patricia||

    Well, he was about to step down (in a month), and probably expected to return as the President of France, in a state visit.

  • rather||

    The check-out is flexible in upmarket hotels-3PM is not unusual. I wondered if he had his dry cleaning with him? Was he leaving that day for sure?

  • ||

    The FoxNews story linked to says that checkout was at noon and room service was sweeping the rooms looking for trays and utensils.

  • Dumb Bunny||

    The maid found a utensil all right.

  • despindle||

    Another AP story said that he had checked out at 12:36 and the maid arrived to clean the room at about 1 PM. I assume he did the electronic checkout on the TV and then lingered in the room.

    Now, I've checked out on the TV when I wasn't quite ready to leave to avoid late charges and then finished packing and left 20 mins later, but I don't think late charges were a big concern for him, especially since it was already late (check out time was noon). He checked out , knowing that would prompt a maid to come clean the room and then hung out in the bathroom completely naked? What plausible counter explanation is there for that?

  • ||

    Exactly. I get a strong sense that this was not just him getting surprised by the maid. It was premeditated.

  • CatoTheElder||

    "I wonder what Strauss-Kahn was still doing in his hotel room long past checkout time"

    Sofitel probably allowed late checkout. If not, so what? DSK Would just pay for another night and put it on the expense account. It's only another $3000. Chump change.

  • CatoTheElder||

    Oops. According to Fox via Drudge:

    "He was supposed to be on the first flight from New York to Washington, D.C., Saturday morning. He missed his flight but did not arrange a late checkout, law enforcement sources said, and should not have been in the room."

    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011.....z1MaWUcw44

  • rather||

    His defense is hinting it is consensual but the sheets are full of blood

  • ||

    More hints. If his ticket said that he flew out in the morning, he could plausibly claim the maid was lying later.

  • ||

    Possibly, but I think it's a little strange to stick around past checkout time when his flight was leaving in a couple hours.

    Everyone knows the maids show up and start cleaning all the rooms around noon.

    How could he be in any way surprised by her arrival? I'm sure this guy has stayed in enough hotels to know what time check out is and when the maids start cleaning.

  • zoltan||

    I've worked at a luxury hotel and people stay late without telling anyone. They think they are above having to tell the little people that they are leaving.

  • Gray Ghost||

    I've worked those places too, zoltan, and I agree. Pain in the ass when you're trying to get through all your checkouts. Usually the, "Oh, will you be staying with us another night then, sir?" treatment gave them the message that it was time to sober up and get the hell out.

    And while there may be more than one maid per floor, I don't ever remember seeing more than one maid per room---unless one was training the other---not that I'd consider a Sofitel a "grand hotel". I was front of the house though, and never worked housekeeping.

  • cynical||

    "I do not know—but, on the other hand, it would be nice to know, and without delay—how a chambermaid could have walked in alone, contrary to the habitual practice of most of New York's grand hotels of sending a "cleaning brigade" of two people, into the room..."

    I know I'm not a gifted logician like BHL, but isn't it possible that the rape occurred precisely because, due to some fluke, one woman was sent instead of two? That is, that a rare opportunity to rape presented itself and DSK took advantage of it?

  • Sudden||

    it's just special pleading for a powerful dick

    Of course a frenchman would excel at that, Henri-Levy especially

  • ||

    a 62-year-old man known by every French person I've asked to have the sexual manners of a primate

    Unless you're now towing the fundie lion, he actually is a primate, as are all humans.

  • alzabo||

    One of my pet peeves as well. I remember I once sold an anthropology student some acid, and then wound up hanging out with him and his friends for about an hour, 'cause they wanted to be sure I hadn't sold them paper- they had a keg so I was like "alright."

    We wound up having a long argument about whether or not humans were primates. This was many years ago so there was no internet to answer the question for us. In his defense, I think he was from New Jersey.

  • SIV||

    To quote the esteemed editor:

    alzabo -- You and I were basically born on the same date or something, right? Of everyone here, your cultural experience/memory tacks closest to mine. Hope that doesn't ruin your day!
  • alzabo||

    Now why would that ruin my day?

  • alzabo||

    Also, What? Lots of years ago."

  • Really? ||

    I think the implication was that guy who didn't know what primates were then did not learn his lesson.

  • Mensan||

    I get annoyed with this as well. I have a friend (who is a paleontologist of all things) who believes all other organisms evolved, but not humans. During one of our many arguments over evolution vs. her strange hybrid of evolution/creation/intelligent design, I stated that humans ARE apes, which she said is debatable. Apparently, taxonomy isn't her strong suit.

  • ||

    As long as there are reasons why poeple die before they reproduce humans will continue to be the bitch of natural selection.

  • Parah Salin||

    That's unnatural selection. Natural selection is genetic variation that thrives or dies based on it's ability to survive the environment, not a choice not to pro-create.

  • Parah Salin||

    That's unnatural selection. Natural selection is genetic variation that thrives or dies based on it's ability to survive the environment, not a choice not to pro-create.

  • Patricia||

    Perhaps the reference is to certain high-ranking churchmen. Unlikely, though.

  • Despicable EuroTrash...||

  • ||

    Maids, godchildren, and aerobics instructors who value their orificial integrity, apparently.

  • air max pas cher||

    thank you

  • ||

    France [...] has counted him among her most devoted and competent servants for so many years.

    This kind of thinking, France, is why you are the punchline of so many jokes, and probably why the word France is synonymous with the being a pussy.

  • ||

    Well, it's soon going to be synonymous with enjoying rape a lot.

  • ||

    That's what happens when you harbor international rapists for decades...

  • ||

    And spend a lot of time describing rape as a mere sexual pedadillo that those puritainical Americans are too prudish to understand.

  • Dumb Bunny||

    Rape is treated as a joke on this blog every day. Why the sanctimony now?

  • Really? ||

    Jokes aside, we do not actually beg for a pass for real rapists.

  • R||

  • Old Man With Candy||

    What is Steve Smith's take on this?

  • STEVE SMITH||

    STEVE SMITH NOT WASTE TIME COMMENTING ON MERE "ATTEMPTED RAPIST."FRENCMEN ALWAYS DOING THINGS HALF-ASS. STEVE SMITH RAPE WHOLE ASS!

  • Old Man With Candy||

    Thank you, Steve. Your contributions are always valued.

  • Dumb Bunny||

    I rest my case.

  • ||

    95% of H&R commenters would shoot a sasquatch rapist on sight. None except possibly MNG, Max, or Hobie would harbor him.

  • R||

    Yup. Just because we joke about it, doesn't mean we don't abhor the behavior. None of us(except the possible exceptions mentioned by Tulpa) would have any objections if the maid had put two bullets in Strauss-Kahn's chest and one in his skull. Most would cheer her on.

  • Hobie Hanson||

    It's not bad enough that you want to arm schoolchildren, now you're going to have armed maids barging into my hotel room because they're too cheap to give you a Do Not Disturb sign?

  • R||

    I can't tell if that post is sarcastic or just stupid. Please tell me it's the former.

  • Destrudo||

    Parody, right? Must be?

  • db||

    I'd capture him and sell him to the circus. *adjusts monocle*

  • ||

    I thought the whole point of slaughtering everyone who could read and slow enough to be caught during the french revolution was to end this sort of thing.

    Perhaps they need another one because it seems too many got through the cracks.

  • ||

    Let's see if we can get through this thread without commenting on certain off-topic aspects of one of the pictures in the original post.

  • SIV||

    The Goddaughter? Shit, I'd fuck her. But only if she consented.

  • SIV||

    The mag cover? I'm curious what year it was. Who was editor? And who wrote the article (or is it an interview)? I bet Reason wishes they could have that one back.

  • johnl||

    1978, before Virginia.

  • SIV||

    I knew it was pre-Virginia. I started reading the mag when she was the editor.

  • SIV||

    How's Johnny Hallyday any kind of embarrassment to France? Outside of a few expats and Francophile hipsters nobody outside of Frogtown knows who the fuck he is.I only know of him because he used to be married to Sylvie Vartan

  • SIV||

  • Rock Action ||

    Ah, Masculin feminin. Beautiful ye ye songstress sings dopey song while about to kill a lover/suitor/metaphor with an untroubled shrug and laugh.

    Godard had the zeitgeist right, I guess.

  • rather||

    Be nice to Bernard Henri-Levy; the poor guy can't afford buttons for his shirt

  • Dumb Bunny||

    That shirt is very important. Look at it. It's unbuttoned!

  • ||

    It's becoming clear to me that the French are just too sexually sophisticated to interpret "no! stop! rape!" as "no".

  • rather||

    We do need to look at a possible set-up but the leaks look incriminating. The fact that the woman shut up for eight years is classic for a rape victim.

    Often women only come out after another has gone first, and can recognize that it wasn't her fault. Her own mother discouraged her from taking legal action.

  • ||

    Unfortunately, delayed accusations are classic for gold-diggers too, and telling the difference is problematic.

  • SIV||

    The Sofitel maid is your classic case of "rape-rape". She reported it immediately while distressed, injured and dripping unwanted semen.

  • ||

    Yes, of course. We were talking about some of the other accusations that have come out of the woodwork since then.

  • SIV||

    On their own, I'm quite skeptical of such accusations. The current criminal charges are exactly how an indisputable rape would occur. "Stranger", violence, and immediate reporting. In anarchotopia we could be measuring the new world order socialist frog for a hemp necktie about now-- if not yesterday.

  • alzabo||

    In an anarchic society we would be thinking about whether the accuseur or the accusee was more likely to be able to kill you.

  • jocular pedant||

    l'accuseuse ou l'accusée

  • ||

    Thank you.

    Of course, in an anarchic society it's unlikely a slug like DSK would have two nickels to rub together so this wouldn't have happened anyway. But, there would be other people who thought they were above the (nonexistent) law.

  • Amakudari||

    Sure, sure, I'd treat them with more skepticism, but some people are outright dismissive. The accusations worthy of investigation, and it's particularly telling that some French Socialists think no woman's dignity is valuable enough to impede a Good Man. They're not even pleading for presumption of innocence, which is totally fair, but switching straight to attack mode.

    And Tiger Woods had how many known mistresses in late 2009 and how many a few months later? Obviously, that wasn't a crime like this, but I can understand a victim afraid to confront a powerful man alone.

  • Au H20||

    I mean, didn't the same happen with feminists rushing to defend Clinton?

    Hey, if you have the right views, actions matter far less.

  • MJ||

    If memory serves, French law does not have presumption of innocence, his apologists may not grasp fully the tactics in a system that does.

  • ||

    Who knew that Steelers fans and Frenchmen had so much in common.

  • cynical||

    Ouch. I should probably relay your sentiment to some Steelers fans I know.

  • ||

    uh-oh

  • ||

    At least two women i have dated have told me they were raped when they were younger...

    and neither ever did shit about it.

    Another friend told me about an experience that happened to her that i would describe as rape but she said it wasn't. Obviously she didn't do anything about it either.

    Anecdotaly i have met more women who have been raped and done nothing then I have met gold digers.

  • CatoTheElder||

    "Often women only come out after another has gone first"

    This is called the Tiger Woods Effect.

  • despindle||

    Very true, especially in the case that the assailant is a near-family member (godparent). And especially when the woman's mother begged her not to report it because it would ruin the mom's political career (she was a socialist party official and DSK was a leader of the party).

  • ||

    It is extraordinary that someone like this did something so stupid at a time when he was likely to mount a challenge to Sarkozy.

    Not to say that smart people haven't done stupid things at extraordinarily inopportune times, but it is remarkable.

    It's like someone who once defected to the Soviet Union assassinating a president, and then in turn being assassinated by someone with Mob ties...

    Maybe that was all just a coincidence! There may not have been any conspiracy behind any of it at all, but I can't blame people for wondering.

    I neither fully doubt nor fully believe the charges (until the evidence comes out), but people have been framed for less. Stranger things have happened.

  • alan||

    You would have to conclude that either he went nuts, or the conspirators went nuts because that isn't a very smart way to run a honey trap. There is a craps game worth of risk involved pushing the actions in the intended direction. Far more chances for it to back fire than to go as planned. If it was the later than you can bet your ass that someone amongst the conspirators stated, 'that idea is so crazy, it just might work' when it was elaborated to them.

  • rather||

    The guy is a jackass. He had a chauffeur driven Porsche
    http://rctlfy.wordpress.com/20.....allegedly/

  • ||

    Hahahahaha.

    What's the point in owning a Porshe if you aren't going to drive it yourself?

  • ||

    He may be a jackass.

    He may be a rich jackass.

    He may be from the "caviar left".

    But being a rich, jackass from the "caviar left" doesn't make him guilty of sexual assault.

    I'm not saying he's innocent. But being a rich, jackass with a chauffeur driven Porsche doesn't have any bearing on whether he was framed.

  • Amakudari||

    So there are several possibilities:

    1. He went crazy and just got all rape-y.
    2. He's always been that way and this time he got caught.
    3. He thought she was his call girl and she was intimidated by his aggressiveness.
    4. She's making the non-consensual part up.
    5. She's part of an elaborate setup that would have to involve at least most of the following: herself, Sofitel, the NYPD, a cadre of Sarkoziens and DSK's own handlers. Something like a double agent infiltrating DSK's guard and telling him there was a French maid escort arriving, another secret agent at Sofitel incorrectly informing an attractive maid that his room was empty, and them hoping -- based on his romantic but totally not violent history -- he would force himself on her. Or she could have consented willingly and then left (to accuse him of forcible oral copulation instead of forcible rape, depending on NY's laws), and by sheer coincidence he left immediately for an airport without his staff and left his phone behind.

    Whatever the outcome, I'm almost certain it won't be 1 or 5. He's entitled to a presumption of innocence, so 2-4 seem more likely, and I'm leaning toward 2-3 based on the (very incomplete) picture we have thus far.

  • ||

    My theory is 2. And that he purposely stayed in the room past checkout time, expecting the maid to show up. Thinking "Hey, I'm boarding a flight back to Europe in a few hours, this hotel is supposed to have a "French flair". Wouldn't it be fun to rape a chambermaid, just like European aristocrats of yore?"

  • ||

    This is implausible, unless he's a complete idiot. For the reasons described above, he would be extremely unlikely to get away with it without losing his job and probably destroying his political future.

  • zoltan||

    Considering the many other reports of his behavior, he's probably an idiot.

  • despindle||

    My bet is he has a habit of raping poor (possibly illegal) immigrant staff and then presenting them with a big stack of cash and saying something like, "You can report this and I will destroy you, or you can take this money and be quiet." Except this time the girl managed to run out of the room before he got to that part.

    You also forget that he is from France. If this incident happened in France it never would have been reported.

  • ||

    1. He's about to board a flight to France.
    2. His ticket is supposed to be for a morning flight. He's getting on a later one (cause you know, the DSKs of the world can just do that).
    3. He's theoretically already checked out.
    4. Once out of the country, the police can check him for evidence.
    5. He most likely assumes the woman won't report the crime, at least until after he's left.
    6. He's an "important man", who can't be hassled with somone down to the police station for DNA tests on the word of some two-bit black Guniean whore who is probably lying for the publicity.

  • ||

    7. He's going to quit his job and run for President of France anyway.
    8. The French press will just giggle about those prudish Americans getting all in a fuss about him fucking the hotel maids.

    I think you VASTLY overestimate the risk to him if he had suceeded in leaving the country. Once he leaves, it's just another he-said she-said story that he can blow off.

  • ||

    The maid is apparently an immigrant from Guinea. A colonialism and racism bonus!

  • ||

    And a French colony at that. Which is probably why she was hired by Sofitel.
    There's probably a lot of French Guniean immigrants in France. And they probably get similar treatment.

    His mistake was in thinking he was in France, and not New York, where being a French Gunieans immigrant carries no particular whiff of conquest.

  • ||

    It is extraordinary that someone like this did something so stupid at a time when he was likely to mount a challenge to Sarkozy.

    Gary Hart did somehting so stupid

    Arnold did something so stupid but didn't get caught.

    Edwards did something so stupid and didn't get caught.

    Clinton did something stupid and got caught.

    But yeah you are right below.
    Even hypocritical leftist dicks are innocent until proven guilty.

    Still being stupid at the worse political time is not a defense.

  • Jim||

    That photo caused the Arab Oil Embargo, and was single-handidly the cause of 70s stagflation.

  • alzabo||

    I'm a little surprised Henri-Levy is still alive, and younger than my mother. I tend to think of everyone I heard of in my teens as old enough to be dead, or at least ancient.

    It does seem to me that, given the degree to which men fetishize maids, entering a hotel room in maid livery is kind of asking for it. I wonder if she was with the CIA.

  • ||

    Right, maids should dress as scuba divers when entering hotel rooms. And nurses should dress like clowns.

  • alzabo||

    Unfortunately, a lot of men also have rubber/fighter pilot fetishes so the scuba gear is not going to be a big improvement. The clown thing has promise though.

  • ||

    Maybe they should just request that you register your fetishes with the front desk to avoid these kinds of misunderstandings. I'll make a note to tell the front desk to avoid sending any employees into my room if they may evoke memories of peanut butter or hairdressers.

  • SIV||

    I have this blog.

  • alzabo||

    Too complicated. I think your clown idea is spot on. The right amount of makeup is hot, but too much is a turnoff.

  • johnl||

    If nurses dressed like clowns ...

  • Warty||

    Why is half the background orange and half black? Is she a Bengal fan or something?

  • yonemoto||

    princeton.

  • ||

    If there's one AFC North team you associate with rape, it has to be the Bengals.

  • Art-P.O.G.||

    I like what you did here. Subtle.

  • michelle baybay||

    hater go stillers. and splosions

  • clamo||

    and Princeton

  • ||

    For once, I can quote Jonah Goldberg with my head held high:

    "I am proud to live in a country where a housekeeper can get a world leader pulled off a plane bound for Paris."

  • SIV||

    Jonah Goldberg is often right. His book on liberals, the total destruction of Will Wilkinson, the statement you're quoting...

  • alzabo||

    Meh, there's a certain power that comes with being an asshole. Unfortunately Goldstein has yet to cross the line and alienate his friends. If he were willing to do that Goldfarb might become an even-handed truth-teller. Fucking horses.

  • SIV||

    Stick around. Your kind are in short supply here.

  • johnl||

    This isn't the premier foit the Tristane Banon story has come up. Here is an article from 2008: http://www.lepost.fr/article/2.....e-dsk.html

  • johnl||

    Anybody read Daddy Frénésie? Is there any evidence that Banon is a journalist? Maybe "novelist" is getting mistranslated.

  • rather||

    la journaliste , par ailleurs auteur de plusieurs livres, raconte qu'un "homme apparemment haut placé" l'aurait pressée afin d'avoir une relation sexuelle. Le nom de celui-ci est systématiquement remplacé par un long "bip".


    The journalist Tristane Banon, and author of several books, met a well-placed man who tried to pressure her into a sexual relationship. His name is systematically replaced by a long 'bip'.


    She wrote this before the NYC case

  • affenkopf||

    I am troubled by a system of justice modestly termed "accusatory," meaning that anyone can come along and accuse another fellow of any crime—and it will be up to the accused to prove that the accusation is false and without basis in fact.

    Unfortunately his statement isn't that far from the truth anymore.

  • Amakudari||

    Except the conviction rate in the US for rape is 13%, which while higher than in the more enlightened beacons of freedom in Europe, is nonetheless quite low.

  • ||

    The meaning of a low conviction rate is open to interpretation. You're assuming that the numerator is the problem when it could just as easily be the denominator (ie, dubious prosecutions of innocents).

  • Amakudari||

    No, the percent is out of reported rapes, and the US prosecutes a higher percentage than Britain convicts. The denominator is in both cases reported rapes, so if the problem lies there it means a far higher proportion of Britons falsely report rape.

    In any case, I'm not here to do a dissertation on rape in the US vs Europe, just to note that 13% is not really a high conviction rate, and certainly not one that would justify saying the US legal system has a presumption of guilt.

    The presumption of guilt would be more like the country I live in, with its conviction rate over 99% for crimes in general. Now, almost no one is prosecuted, but you're fucked if you are.

  • cynical||

    The problem is that it's a difficult crime to prove, unless you simply assume that the accuser is telling the truth. When the two are complete strangers or there's corresponding evidence of violence, physical evidence is usually enough, but when they're in a situation where consensual sex is not implausible, then you have to consider whether it was retroactive revocation of consent, which doesn't actually correspond to any crime. And since you really can't prove it factually either way, it comes down to whether you trust the accuser beyond a reasonable doubt.

  • ||

    And in this case, the accuser is a poor black immigrant woman living in New York.

    So, DSK could reasonably presume that either she wouldn't talk until after the evidence was destroyed, or he could just say she was lying.

    If he had left the country, he had a reasonable presumption that he would get away with it.

  • ||

    What would be interesting, if there were any stats on it, would be the conviction rates in cases where the accused denies the sexual contact occurred at all, vs. the cases where the accused claims it did occur but was consensual.

  • cynical||

    It's still a ridiculous statement. What are the alternatives? An honor system, where we expect criminals to report their own misdeeds?

  • ||

    I have been thinking about Bernard Henri Levi's reaction to the Strauss Kahn rape allegations. I think you have to look at it from a man like Levi's perspective. And when you do it reveals a lot about Europe and why so many horrible things have happened there in the last 150 years. If you don't believe in the Enlightenment and its predecessor the Reformation with their idea that all men are created equal and endowed with certain rights and dignities before the law and you do not believe in the Occidental faiths and the idea that all men from lowest to the highest are subject to God and you also believe Strauss Kahn is a great man doing great things, how do you justify his prosecution for raping a person who so clearly is not great or doing great things? To that you could also add in a good mix of 19th Century Romanticism and the ideas of great men and spirit of the age. From Levi's perspective Strauss is running the IMF and helping to bring a just government to France, so what if his tastes in sex run to forcing himself on women? Is the dignity of one maid in New York more important bringing prosperity to the developing world and a just government to France? It is only if you believe that every person is endowed with a unique and inviolable dignity before God or the law that you can answer such a question in the affirmative. Levi doesn't and he accordingly answers the question in the negative. I and the other people on this board no doubt find that answer appalling. But we are all Americans and children of the Enlightenment. Levi is neither.

    When you realize this, it is easy to see how Europe has so often fallen down the slippery slope from thinking that great men doing great things don't live by the same rules as ordinary people to thinking it is okay to kill lesser mortals for the common good. If that maid or people like her are not entitled to their personal dignity in the same way someone like Strauss Kahn is, she is in brutal terms less of a human being than he is. And if she is less of a human being, taking her life for the right end is perfectly justified.

    I think it also goes a long ways to explaining why European intellectuals hate two groups more than anyone, Americans and Jews. America is the ultimate product of the Enlightenment. America has always stood for the ideal that all men are created and equal and equal before the law. If you believe that, then great men can't do great things if doing so violates the law or others' rights. The existence of such a place and its success is intolerable to European intellectuals. They therefore try to say that it doesn't really exist that America has never lived up to its ideals and that our allegiance to them is nothing but propaganda. The unassimilated religious Jew, like the unrepentant American, also believes in a higher law and the dignity and ultimate equality of every human being. Worse still, unlike Americans, the religious Jew is not across the Atlantic. He is often right there in Europe constantly causing problems and refusing to follow the program for the great good in the name of his barbaric, religious law.

    I think the Strauss Kahn affair and Levi's reaction to it is an important teaching point for Americans. Whenever European intellectuals or their American toadies start spouting off about the greater good and the need for shared sacrifice and all of other high sounding rhetoric of which they are so fond, we should remember that at the mundane level it boils down to it being okay for someone like Strauss Kahn to rape a hotel maid in New York.

  • Amakudari||

    I hold it against the American judge who, by delivering him to the crowd of photo hounds, pretended to take him for a subject of justice like any other.

    This is about as naked an affirmation of your assertions as humanly possible.

    Regardless of how the actual case plays out -- and I'm rooting for justice, whatever that may be -- the misogynistic, brazenly illiberal vitriol from the French intellectual elite needs no trial by jury. They've said far more about Gallic contempt for the individual than any petty stabs like "freedom fries" ever well.

  • rather||

    John , there is truth in what you said and it reminds me of the privileged class mentality of Europeans.

    There was a certain pride in the village mentality of the people too. It was and still is a symbiotic relationship.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

    Very astute observation, John. While I agree with you that European culture, has through history, tended to view Judaism with suspicion because of the belief in "a higher law" than the King/State/People, but I'm not too sure that European anti-Judaism stems from a belief that Jews believe in equality. Indeed, much polemic against the Jews revolves around the "chosen people" meme.

    Still, I think you're on to something.

  • ||

    Enlightenment and its predecessor the Reformation with their idea that all men are created equal and endowed with certain rights and dignities before the law

    The Reformation had fuck-all to do with individual rights. The Magna Carta was the product of a Catholic country, for goodness sake. At least in Catholic countries you had the church and state to play against each other to gain some marginal protection of your rights; in early Protestant countries the two were almost universally allied together.

  • ||

    The Reformation had everything to do with individual rights. If affirmed the right of the individual to go directly to God and to interpret the bible for himself without relying on the church. This radical notion of individualism that started with Erasmus and continued with Luther set off a chain of events that led directly to the Enlightenment. Read some fucking history sometime.

    Tulpa, in your own way, you are really dumber than Tony.

  • ||

    If affirmed the right of the individual to go directly to God and to interpret the bible for himself without relying on the church.

    That was the ostensible reason for separation from Rome, but Protestant leaders closed the book on that once they had power. Luther in particular morphed into a mini-pope himself when members of the nascient Lutheran church started coming up with their own individual interpretations of scripture that contradicted his. Protestants burned heretics and witches too (in fact at an even greater rate than Catholics).

  • ||

    But there was no stopping the idea. Who cares that Luther turned into a mini tyrant? The point is that the ideas he put forth went on even though he didn't himself live by them.

  • ||

    Outside of the Netherlands, it didn't translate into much political freedom. (England's democratic and individual rights traditions date back to its period as a Catholic country)

    Most Protestant countries were even worse authoritarian shitholes than Catholic ones.

  • ||

    it didn't translate into much political freedom.

    But it did translate into equality.

    One can be equally repressed.

    You have to remember the reformation had everything to do with Catholicisms excesses and forgiveness towards the rich and powerful.

    Equality is what we are talking about here. It is often confused with liberty and in fact it is an important part of liberty...but it is not liberty by itself.

    To be honest i am surprised that John didn't hit on this in his essay. When he started talking about Jews and americans i thought he would nail my thesis of the origins of liberty in the Judao-christian tradition.

  • ||

    When you realize this, it is easy to see how Europe has so often fallen down the slippery slope from thinking that great men doing great things don't live by the same rules as ordinary people to thinking it is okay to kill lesser mortals for the common good. If that maid or people like her are not entitled to their personal dignity in the same way someone like Strauss Kahn is, she is in brutal terms less of a human being than he is. And if she is less of a human being, taking her life for the right end is perfectly justified.

    How many Iraqi and Afghan civilians have Americans killed, John? For some vaguely-defined greater good. And then we weep and moan over the tragedy of a single Marine getting blown up while ignoring that there's 20 kids laying dead and another 20 with ground beef for arms on the other side of Baghdad because we made another oopsie with our missile targeting. Yes, bastions of equality of all human beings, we!

    Not absolving Europe in general or BHL in particular, but dehumanizing people who are in one's way knows no continental boundaries.

  • ||

    Shut the fuck up you ignorant slut. Yes, people die in war. And yes Iraqi lives are just as valuable as American ones. But that fact says nothing about whether wars are ever justified or this topic. How many people did we kill in World War II or any other war? Innocent people die in every war. Yet, that fact does not deny the tragedy of it or deny those people's humanity. By your logic no war would ever be worth fighting no matter how just the cause.

    But that has nothing to do with this topic. So do me a favor and fuck off.

  • ||

    The Iraq and Afghanistan wars aren't WW2, John. And there were pointless atrocities committed even in WW2 (Dresden and the Tokyo firebombing come immediately to mind). The deaths of civilians are unavoidable in war, I agree -- which is why you better damn well have an ironclad justification before you start one.

    And you didn't address my point about the dipshits (not you, I'm thinking more of Ken Shultz types) who care only about American casualties.

  • ||

    I have made the point on this blog numerous times (you can look it up if you don't believe me) that if we are not willing to sacrifice American lives for a cause, the cause isn't worth taking foreign lives. War sucks and the idea is to kill the enemy and break his will to fight. Yes we should care about other casualties and only inflict in causes we feel are worth the lives of our own people.

  • ||

    Well, that's good, as I said I don't think you're as much of a problem as Shultz and his fellows. But Americans tend to have much more fondness for air strikes (which tend to kill far more civilians and virtually no Americans) than ground campaigns (which cost more American lives but usually fewer native civilians).

  • anarch||

    That, and the comments on it, were worth reading. Thank you.

  • zoltan||

    thinking it is okay to kill lesser mortals for the common good.

    Like predator drone attacks?

    Everything else was fucking great and spot on. Absolutely correct.

  • ||

    I think the difference is that of a sociopath killing for pleasure should be forgiven become he is great vs a democratic nation using the best weapons to kill its enemies.

    I don't think innocents who died from drone attacks is a forgivable act. We tend to simply file it as unfortunate but necessary then forget it.

    Perhaps this is simply a nuance but i am fairly certain that i will never give up the notion that there are plausible circumstances when a nation defending itself must sacrifice innocents to preserve itself.

  • SteveM||

    I think it also goes a long ways to explaining why European intellectuals hate two groups more than anyone, Americans and Jews.

    Strauss Kahn is Jewish, and an avid supporter of Israel.

  • KraMal||

    BHL is Jewish too, as a significant minority of French intellectuals.

  • ||

    Which probably explain why hey stick together.
    Strauss Kahn once said (in an interview with Tribune Juive) that every morning he asks himself : "What can I do today for Israel ?"
    Well, he made Israel President Moshe Katsav, a rape felon, fell less lonely. Great job !

  • SteveM||

    From Levi's perspective Strauss is running the IMF and helping to bring a just government to France

    From Levi's perspective, Strauss is a a fellow Jew.

  • ||

    I see it as just an example of latent classism in European society. (Especially the French.)

    Instead of having an official aristocracy with tacit permission to rape the chambermaids, it's an aristocracy of bureaucratic elites.

    Those elites have ALWAYS raped the chambermaids, ever since chambermaids existed. So why get into a fuss about it now?

    The French might have executed their nobles, but they definitely didn't execute the idea that powerful men should be expected to take sexual liberties with subordinate women.

  • ||

    You're really overthinking this. Europeans intellectuals hate Americans for the very simple reason that we are richer and more powerful. Don't go all French on us and attempt to impose intellectual patterns on what is basically just envy and fear.

    "so many horrible things have happened there in the last 150 years"

    No worse than the horrible things that happened in the Europe during the 1,850 years before that - 30 Years War, Counter reformation, War of the Roses, Viking raids, etc. etc. etc.

  • ||

    I don't agree with BHL, but I do have to point out that the Enlightenment was a product of Europe and the French (Voltaire) contributed significantly to it.

  • MJ||

    This sort of forgiveness and fawning over of bureaucratic aristocracy is what passes for sexual sophistication among European intellectuals.

    Welch is being anti-intellectual and prudish American side here.

  • ||

    It is not about sex. It is about power and position. If Strauss Kahn had been an ordinary Frenchman caught raping a hotel maid, no one in Europe would care that America is prosecuting him.

  • MJ||

    John, that's what I meant about "aristocracy". The comment about Welch is my continued annoyance for the Reason staff's unthinking embrace of intellectual elites around '08. This sort of filthy attitude is really at the core of "intellectualism".

  • ||

    As I said above, in the end it is about the right of someone like Strauss Kahn to be able to rape some hotel maid in New York.

  • NotSure||

    Good to see this article on BHL, I only wish that people heard about this arsewipe when he convinced the French government to attack Libya. Despite their reputation as being effete and intellectual, in France the macho culture is pretty strong, women in politics are few in number, and those few are generally token appointments. Segolene Royal had zero chance of ever winning the elections as does Marine Le Pen, its not their politics that puts off the voters, its the fact that French want to be ruled by a powerful patriarchial figure.

    To all those Americans here who wish to paint Europe in one broad brush, Germany, Britain is as different to France as USA is to Mexico is to Brazil. The Germans and British have disliked the French much longer than America even existed.

  • ||

    Sure they hate each other. But they all, sans the British to some extent, suffer from the same intellectual sickness.

  • Brian E||

    "Intellectual"?

  • ||

    Germany has a female chancellor, no?

  • ||

    Tulpa you are like a child walking into an adult conversation. Jesus fucking Christ Tulpa, Germany? They virtually invented the kind of thinking I am talking about. And this has nothing to do with men and women. It has to do with powerful being something different and held to a different standard of morality than everyone else.

  • ||

    NotSure's post was about female leaders. And no, Germany did not invent that line of thinking, I'm pretty sure it goes back to the first tribal chieftain in 20,000 BC or so. But it's curious that the heartland of the wonderful individualist Reformation is also the birthplace of top-down thinking.

  • zoltan||

    I think John is referring to Prussian statism which began in the early 1800s, I believe. If you can't understand that states evolve then you shouldn't be talking about history. Just as the United States began as a "wonderful individualist" country with a lot of Protestant roots, it also has devolved into worse and worse statism.

  • ||

    I think Tulpa is touching on the principle that John's great man thesis is as old as agriculture and what John is describing is actually a modern summoning of humankind's age old demon.

  • ||

    Yeah the Romans had this thinking codified into law while the Germans were still toiling illiterate in the blood and the mud of primeval forests.

  • ||

    Tulpa you are like a child walking into an adult conversation. Jesus fucking Christ Tulpa, Germany? They virtually invented the kind of thinking I am talking about. And this has nothing to do with men and women. It has to do with powerful being something different and held to a different standard of morality than everyone else.

  • ||

    This phenomenon exists everywhere, even in countries too young to ever had a aristocratic society. In australia, women who accused footy players of sexual harassment or rape have often been dismissed as fame seekers and liars. This isn't confined to Europe or especially bad in Europe because of its history.

  • ||

    Oh please. The British are far, far worse than the Germans when it comes to things like droit de seigneur, classism and fawing over aristocracy. I suppose the evil of the modern German approach is that they pretend that elite status is achieved through meritocratic means, the French and British tend to still believe in birth as an important arbiter.

  • Dumb Bunny||

    he convinced the French government to attack Libya

    All by himself? Impressive.

  • Ted S.||

    The average German may not like the average French person, but I get the impression that the political classes are pretty much in bed with each other.

    There seems to be a fairly extreme degree of political orthodoxy on issues like the EU, immigration, and the environment, and woe betide anybody like Timo Soini who tries to buck those trends.

  • ||

    Germany has been at odds with most of the EU on bailing out member nations in crisis.

    The issues on which the EU is divided are simply different from those on which the US is divided. The US leadership is pretty orthodox on drug policy and SS/Medicare.

  • ||

    Joan of Arc?

  • rather||

    Eveyone relax! She wanted it and Arnold has an epi :-)

  • rather||

    Everyone too ;-)

  • Crickets||

  • ||

    Hey BHL! It certainly looks like you're trying to do a crass and baseless version of Zola's "J'accuse." The subject of Zola's tour de force was a true victim and hero, NOT your BFF Dominique, nicknamed "the hot rabbit," "the great seductor," etc. Also, I read the whole piece and BHL said that Dominique certainly had never behaved in a brutish/abusive way towards him. Hey BHL! That's cuz you don't have tits!

  • ||

    Wow that jsut doesnt make any sense at all dude.

    www.total-anon.us.tc

  • Art-P.O.G.||

    Oh anonymity bot, I missed you so.

  • Colin||

    Where was Schwarzenegger when this attack took place?

  • ||

    In California throwing the pig skin around with his bastard son.

  • ||

    Please let's not pretend you "don't know if he's guilty" when you describe an attempt to find a discrepancy in hte evidence as "blaming the victim." If she really is the victim he realy is guilty, so if you bluntly state she is the victim let's not pretend you don't bluntly state he is guilty.

  • Kono||

    Since Julian Assange, I tend not to take seriously accusations of rape that comes out of the blue against men that are often on the news.

  • ||

    Dominique Strauss-Kahn may well have done many wonderful things for France, the IMF, and the Koch Brothers' pals in Europe, Bernie.

    However, and this comes straight from someone opposed to alternative interrogation techniques (sic), if DSK raped, attempted to rape, and/or otherwise attacked the housekeeper in question, this damn fool believes that DSK's wee wee ought to get the same treatment as Napoleon's head.

    Before this foolish prattle, I had only yearned for the vice grips-inspired fingernail removal of David Addington, Chris Matthews, and Eli Lake. Add Bernie to that list. Oh, and per Garrison Keillor, toss in Charlie Rose, too.

    Welch, nice piece, but you lose five points for using the (ahem) efforts of Lucianne Goldberg's Obese Little Boy to make your case. What's next? The musings of John P. Normanson and/or Luke Russert?

  • John Markley||

    You want Strauss-Kahn's penis exiled to an Atlantic island?

  • ||

    Markley,

    Like, like be sure to get ready for the prom. And don't forget to grab five bottles of cough syrup at Wal-Mart to get a buzz on before fifth period study hall.

    Nice to see that you remain mired in puberty and junior high school, punk.

  • ||

    Markley,

    Be sure to ask your parents if it's OK to go out Friday night.

    Oh, I forgot, you don't talk to your parents since they grounded you for spray-painting Marley Hearts Kochs on the shed next to the football field.

    Punk.

  • ||

    If you don't like being pointed out wrong, why don't you do a little more googling before you post?

  • margaret soltan||

    To be fair, Johnny Hallyday is Belgian.

  • ||

    This is the 21st century version of jus primae noctis.

  • ||

    Matt, you neglected to quote the best part of BHL's absurd screed -- the reference to DSK's support for "proletarian nations". Yes, Bernard Henri-Levy believes that some nations are proletarian. I suppose that means that other nations are kulak, right?

  • daveinboca||

    BHL is ruining any chance he has later to get on Charlie Rose's daisy-chain roundtable of elitist butt-sniffers to explain his egregious ninnyhood.

    DSK has no emergency-release button on his tiny circumcised pecker and BHL lacks the same button on his non-stop motormouth exhalations.

    I'm sure his attack on Tristane Banon takes into account that she was DSK's wife's 21yr-old goddaughter when this smarmy little non-Christian "lured" her into a studio apt with a double bed and TV for a beginners' luck interview.

    Probably not, since BHL has the intellectual development of Donald Trump and the moral development of the young Charles Manson.

    I hope that Rose has learned his lesson and doesn't stain his roundtable with BHL's robo-drool from this time onward.

  • Jenny||

    "until this week was the single biggest political threat to the sitting president of France"

    Reminds me a scene from a Woody Allen movie:

    Doris: You have no values. With you its all nihilism, cynicism, sarcasm, and orgasm.

    Harry Block: Hey, in France I could run for office with that slogan, and win!

  • ChrisO||

    BHL has nothing on Quentin Robert DeNameland, the Greatest Living Philostopher Known to Mankind.

  • ||

    Oh why did you have to spoil a fine bit of writing with the hoary old Jerry Lewis smack. The day after he hangs up his MDA spurs to boot.

  • ||

    Who do I have to rape to become a philosophical superstar?

  • sevo||

    joshua corning|5.17.11 @ 5:03PM|#
    "Who do I have to rape to become a philosophical superstar?"

    In France?
    Doing grievous harm to any clearly obvious facts will do just fine.
    Sartre made a career of it. And was lucky not to be stoned to death when he made speeches extolling communism to those who lived under it.

  • Zuki||

    Where are the Lefty Luvies (Jemima Khan, Michael Moore, Bianca Jagger, etc.), or the head of the IMF not their cup of tea. I mean they did it for Julian Assange. It just shows the moral bankruptcy of the Left. It was never about due process.

  • eeee||

    It's even more interesting considering that he was the front runner for the French Socialist party.

  • non-smoker||

    The hyphen is in the wrong place.

    It's B-H L, not B H-L. Check the old Reason cover.

  • ||

    While I can appreciate the "shirt-unbuttoner" comment, given one particular of the allegations the term "shirt-lifter" comes to mind.

  • ||

    The question is: What has Dominique Strauss-Kahn REALLY done that he's paying for now? It is well known that people with power and influence have friends in high places that are able to help in such circumstances. So who did this arrogant bastard piss off?

  • ||

    I agree, but enough of prosecuting BHL him for his unbuttoned shirt, any "philosopher" has the right to look hot. We don't want BHL to look like Noam Chomsky, do we? And my friend, Jerry Lewis ROCKS (King of comedy, anyone?) As for Johnny Halliday, Milli Vanilli is a far worse embarrassment !

  • eeee||

    Oh, so this guy gets castigated for essentially being Pepé Le Pew, but your commie traitor hero Julian Assange is being unjustly persecuted by some dystopic gynocracy? Hang both of these assholes.

  • ||

    Indeed, BHL is a true embarassment and never was a philosopher (except for the media) Have you ever seen Jürgen Habermas, John Rawls or Paul Ricoeur, displaying their opinion in such a lightly manner?

  • ||

    This is stern apretiation of BHL piece.
    I cannot agree with your opinions, since for us, Europeans, it really looks like a media lynching. Whatever you hold as right, not all accused are equal, and nothing justifies the «dangerous criminal» treatment DSK as been subjected to.
    Most shocking to me was the display of ignomious ignorance of the American Judge when she said that she was particularly worried by the fact that DSK was arrested boarding a plane, implying that he was running away.
    Anyone reading even the big letters in papers, knows that he had a meeting with chancellor Merkel scheduled in Sunday. Was he supposed to go in a rowing boat to Berlin?
    Besides, when you do come out of your bathroom, after bath, do you come in a black tie suite, or naked, for Christ sake?

  • StChom||

    BHL is a joke. You have to see the hilarious movie he made, or the video of him receiving a cream pie and going berserk.

    But whatever you social rank, perp walks are barbaric.

    And if DSK pleads not guilty, we won't ever know the final truth about what happened in that room.

    Even if the greater odds are for the simpler, saddest truth.

  • ||

    The France's national disgraces are nowadays so numerous ... From it's current President up to the one who had been presented as his more dangerous contender until his last supposed pranks... Well, fortunatly for us, French, BHL the Great is striving to spread the voice of justice and courage throughout the world. Look and listen at that unforgattable moment of bravery:
    http://www.dailymotion.com/vid.....-iran_news

  • ||

    re: "the only decent way you can arrive at "nothing in the world can justify" Strauss-Kahn's treatment is if you oppose all perp walks equally"

    But the French do exactly that, and quite consciously! It's conceived of as a right not to be publicly humiliated when accused but not found guilty.

    More info here:
    http://www.theatlantic.com/pol.....lk/239158/

  • ||

    If I were the chambermaid I would accept a couple of millions and not press charges. That would be more useful to her (would be for me, anyway). His reputation and career have already been irremediably ruined and he will have nightmares about this week in hell for the rest of his life-- in fact I suspect the whole experience, including the public auto-da-fe, must have castrated DSK and rendered him incurably impotent until the end of his days, the worst sentence imaginable to anyone of his kind.

  • ||

    Okay Matt, it's July 1, and with today's revelations, are you going to revisit this bullshit column of yours?

    And yes, I do oppose all perp walks.

  • ||

    Matt, your column is looking really authoritarian-loving and fascist right now. I thought Reason was libertarian.

    Just because BHL and DSK are both smelly piles excrement does not mean that they are wrong or a rapist, respectively.

    Time to retract, Matt.

  • Ana Luiza||

    This is a great article.
    I just don't understand why French philosophers are so quiet. It pisses me of.

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