Megan Needs an Editor

Convicted rapist Michael Dodele was freed Oct. 16 after serving two decades in jail. By law ("Megan's Law," to be specific), his name was put on a public database of convicted sex offenders. Thirty-five days later, Dodele was stabbed to death in his mobile home.

Police arrested his next-door neighbor, 29-year-old Ivan Garcia Oliver, who gave the L.A. Times a jailhouse interview:

Oliver said he has a son who was molested in the past, and he took action to protect the child.

"Society may see the action I took as unacceptable in the eyes of 'normal' people," Oliver said. "I felt that by not taking evasive action as a father in the right direction, I might as well have taken my child to some swamp filled with alligators and had them tear him to pieces. It's no different."

Although Oliver did not say he killed Dodele, he said that "any father in my position, with moral, home, family values, wouldn't have done any different. At the end of the day, what are we as parents? Protectors, caregivers, nurturers."

There was a crucial flaw in Oliver's logic.

In fact, Dodele was not a child molester. But a listing on the Megan's Law website could have left Oliver with the impression that he had abused children because of the way it was written.

Although Dodele's listing has been taken down since his death, a spokesman for the state attorney general said the site described the man's offenses as "rape by force" and "oral copulation with a person under 14 or by force."

"He was convicted of other bad things, but nothing involving a minor," said Richard F. Hinchcliff, chief deputy district attorney for Lake County. But "it would be easy to understand why someone might think so looking at the website."

Dodele's crimes involved sexual assaults on adult women, records show.

Story here. Brian Doherty warned us about "Megan's Flaws" a decade ago.

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  • ||

    So he made a preemptive strike based on faulty intelligence. Better that than wait around for the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud.

  • ||

    So he protected his son by making sure that he won't be around to protect him in the future. Good thinking, fucktard.

  • ||

    And the lists are riddled with inaccuracies. All hail the WWW version of the scarlet letter. Everybody who supports these sex offender registaraion lists on-line has blood on their hands. Every one. When a completely innocent person gets killed, you can claim credit for that too.

    You knew it was coming, you encouraged it, sleep well tonight.

  • Alice Bowie||

    The Scarlet Letter is just NOT a good idea.

  • ||

    One redneck asshole killing another redneck ex-con in a trailer park...

    Standard Libertarian Disclaimer #21 about the principle and all, but I won't be losing sleep over this one...

  • VM||

    "Dodele was stabbed to death in his mobile home."

    well, Oliver got him before the tornado did.

    srsly. this is a very sad tale, and the "Scarlet Lesson" mentioned is very chilling.

  • ||

    J sub D,

    I wrote my previous post before yours appeared, so the sleeping tonight part is not a response to you.

    Also, I agree that Megan's Law is a dangerous precedent. We're beginning to see the dangers and it probably wont be long before a similar list is proposed for drug users, etc...

    However, if Mr. Oliver had such an urge to kill that he did what he did, I think the Megan's Law list is more of a trigger in this case. He needed something to provoke him, and he found it on the intertubes...

  • Episiarch||

    Maybe politicians should have a website put up regarding them and all the crimes they've committed. It's for the children, right?

  • ||

    Taktix®

    I figgered as much.
    I'm just so angry because a 10 year old could have predicted this. 10 year olds don't vote. They don't legislate. Adults do.

  • ||

    Also, I agree that Megan's Law is a dangerous precedent. We're beginning to see the dangers and it probably wont be long before a similar list is proposed for drug users, etc...

    I'll wager it has, somewhere. At least for drug dealers.

  • ||

    I'll wager it has, somewhere. At least for drug dealers.

    I wouldn't take that bet. I'd guarantee Lord Arpaio has something lke that cooking down in ol' Maricopa County...

  • Chuck||

    J_D:

    A google search for "drug dealer registry law" returned over 600,000 hits, starting with this one from Maine.

    It's for the children, naturally.

  • ||

    Although, on the other hand, I might support an online listing of drug dealers. That way, if I'm out of town and my stash runs dry, I know who to call...

  • ||

    A google search for "drug dealer registry law" returned over 600,000 hits, starting with this one from Maine.

    It's for the children, naturally.


    And when their homes start getting torched, (no dope dealers in my neighborhood) we'll get to hear "Who could have forseen it?"

  • ||

    Along those same lines, how about a database of convicted prostitutes?

  • Abdul||

    Along those same lines, how about a database of convicted prostitutes?

    It's called Craigslist.

  • ||

    "Dodele's crimes involved sexual assaults on adult women, records show"

    I doubt the women he raped are too broken up about this. The problem is that he should have never gotten out of jail in the first place. My god if multiple acts of rape don't get you a ticket to the bar hotel for the rest of your life, what does? Yeah, the guy that killed him is unbalanced. But, if it had been one of the women this guy raped, would anyone have cared? I sure wouldn't have.

  • ||

    John, you seem to have given up on rehabilitation, have you?
    Just askin'.

  • GILMORE||

    "any father in my position, with moral, home, family values, wouldn't have done any different."

    "...because life is precious...and god, and the bible"...

    Dear fucking sweet krishna on a stick. 'I had to preemptively stab me neighbor to death, *because of my FAMILY VALUES*'

    I feel like the cop in No Country for Old Men (just finished reading it)... you wonder whether shit has always been this bad, or whether we really are devolving

  • ||

    "John, you seem to have given up on rehabilitation, have you?
    Just askin'."

    Depends on the crime. For a crime like theft or maybe a one time act, like say being in a gang and shooting a rival gang member when you were young, yes I think there is such a thing as rehibilitation. But for attacking and raping women multiple times? I honestly don't see any reason to beleive this guy was "rehabilitated" or care if he was. Rape of this sort, violent rape, is just a horrible crime and is committed by only the most twisted mind. You do something like that multiple times and you should never be allowed out of jail. Now, that doesn't mean that I want the whackjob who killed this guy on the street either, but I have no sympathy for rapist in this case.

  • Tacos mmm...||

    For a crime like theft [...]


    Thieves are the biggest repeat offenders.

  • ||

    John, you seem to have given up on rehabilitation, have you?
    Just askin'.


    Under the current prison system?

    NO

    FUCKING

    WAY

    Criminals tend to become more dangerous when they get out? Why?

    1. The ex-con stigma prevents any gainful employment.
    2. One who intends to commit crimes upon release can meet a wide swath of contacts

    If we had a more just justice system, I'd be all for rehab, but as it stands now, no, it won't work...

  • ||

    In what universe is stabbing someone to death "taking evasive action"?

    Really, this guy should work in politics.

  • ||

    I'm just so angry because a 10 year old could have predicted this. 10 year olds don't vote. They don't legislate. Adults do.

    Be angry about this--the adults knew exactly what they were doing when Megan's Law was passed. All right, they thought, if the bleeding-hearts and the queers won't let us summarily execute perverts, we'll publish their names and addresses after they get out of prison, and it'll only be a matter of time before someone does our dirty work for us.

    Of course, we'll have to send that someone to prison too. Small price to pay.

  • ||

    For a crime like theft [...]
    Thieves are the biggest repeat offenders.


    Then maybe rehabilitation is not possible. Some people really are just criminals.

  • Alice Bowie||

    Dear An Ottowa Reader:

    If u let people (especially adults...and the older, the less compassionate) vote on any matter that screws other people but themselves...they will vote for it.

    People are generally MEAN hearted and MEAN SPIRITED. Religous jealouts are the worst.

    Take Larry Craig 4 example. Typical republican. Typical Conservative. Very much against homos. Very much against gay marriages. And Like many priest, deacons, boy scout masters (who are anti homo, by the way), tother so-called conservative...is a closet case faggot that plays beef-jerkie in public restrooms.

    Yet, these people to this day will vote against homos...Why, b-cause religious people, conservative people, and the like don't know how to mind their own business !!! A bunch of incompassonate assholes.

    Look at Dick Cheney, conservative as hell...except for his lezbo daughter.

    In short, the scarlet letter is a bad idea

  • Ramsey||

    Have you read the laws, John? I haven't, because there are too many on the books to possibly read, and you need a degree in legalese to understand what they mean. We are all criminals, we just haven't been caught yet.

    Let ten guilty free....imprison one innocent, yadda yadda yadda insert libertarian quote here.

  • ||

    I know Arpaio has a list of DUI convictions online (with pictures and BAC!), but he hasn't gotten around to the list for people convicted of drug crimes. Maybe that'll be his Christmas gift to Maricopa County this year.

  • ||

    Arpaio strikes me as one of those kids who didn't get to hang with the cool kids who smoke up after school. Now he's exacting his revenge...

  • ||

    Have you read the laws, John? I haven't, because there are too many on the books to possibly read, and you need a degree in legalese to understand what they mean. We are all criminals, we just haven't been caught yet.


    Too bad, ignorance of the law is NOT an excuse.

  • ||

    "Have you read the laws, John? I haven't, because there are too many on the books to possibly read, and you need a degree in legalese to understand what they mean. We are all criminals, we just haven't been caught yet."

    No, I haven't read all the laws, but I think it is a pretty good guess that raping women violates one or two of them. Save that crap for a case that deserves it.

  • ||

    Save that crap for a case that deserves it.

    I have to (mostly) agree with John here. While it does provide a dangerous precedent, I really don't give two shits about a rapist and the social isolation (or stabbed-by-a-crazy-neighbor) said rapist would experience from Megan's Law.

  • ||

    I really don't give two shits about a rapist and the social isolation (or stabbed-by-a-crazy-neighbor) said rapist would experience from Megan's Law.

    lawnsheep,

    When an innocent person gets whacked because of a government bureaucratic SNAFU, present yourself to the authorities as an accomplice. Please. For others who have a childlike faith in government competence, especially in the justice system, go here, take a look around, but don't worry, because IT COULD NEVER HAPPEN TO YOU!

  • ||

    1. The ex-con stigma prevents any gainful employment.
    2. One who intends to commit crimes upon release can meet a wide swath of contacts


    Taktix®

    Agreed. Our present system is fucking broke, but no politician is willing to risk being labelled "Soft on Crime". So the revolving door keeps spinning. Sheesh.

  • ||

    Who cares about this guy. Megan's law was not designed to protect creepy old men. It was designed to protect the CHILDREN! This creepy old guy got what was coming to him because he was going to rape his neighbor's kid!

    /sarcasm

  • ||

    When an innocent person gets whacked because of a government bureaucratic SNAFU, present yourself to the authorities as an accomplice. Please.

    Maybe I should have made a distinction between a rapist and a falsely convicted rapist. I was assuming this guy really was a piece of trash who raped multiple women. I see where you are coming from, but the tone is really a bit much. I could make the same argument from the other side and say that anyone in favor of re-introducing a rapist (yes, "reintroduce," just like the sub-sentient animals they are) into society who then recommits the crime is an accomplice as well.

  • robc||

    Combine this with the Nevada website problems from a few posts down and you can end up with non-sex offenders getting whacked.

  • ||

    abdul-

    Along those same lines, how about a database of convicted prostitutes?

    It's called Craigslist.

    Possible threadwinner...

  • Salvius||

    One of the many things I hate the government for is forcing me into the unpleasant position of siding with the creeps.

    The trouble with fighting for human freedom is that one spends most of one's time defending scoundrels. For it is against scoundrels that oppressive laws are first aimed, and oppression must be stopped at the beginning if it is to be stopped at all.
    (Henry Louis Mencken)

  • ||

    I could make the same argument from the other side and say that anyone in favor of re-introducing a rapist (yes, "reintroduce," just like the sub-sentient animals they are) into society who then recommits the crime is an accomplice as well.

    If you want to argue that rapists should get life sentences, argue that.

    Don't argue that vigilante justice is the way to go. Unless you think that it is.

  • ||

    Did this newly-minted murderer think he was going to get a slap on the back and ice cream cake or something? It's terribly difficult for me to understand how he could do what he did; the only way I can piece it together from my vantage is if he really thought he was going to be lauded for ridding the world of a convicted rapist.

    lawnsheep,

    J sub D is making a clear, and important, point: Megan's Law (and laws like it) do not need to be struck down out of sympathy for criminals (although that statement invariably leads to long-winded discussions about rehabilitation potential and continuing to punish people after they have paid their prison debt), but because of what could happen to innocent people wrongly affected by them.

    Our douchebag trailer park-dwelling murderer here is patting himself on the back for killing another human being...for the children. This law encourages vigilantism.

  • ||

    And, of course, a lot of people's standard reply to my point is "Good fucking riddance!" Sexual assault is a horrible crime and it makes people feel good to get on their collective moral high-horses about it. But, we should not be quick to advocate the taking of life, not even to "avenge" horrible crimes. Two wrongs don't make a right.

  • SIV||


    Don't argue that vigilante justice is the way to go. Unless you think that it is.


    If I was on Oliver's jury I would argue just that.

    But I don't live in California and routinely round file my summonses.

  • SIV||

    In an anarchist society wouldn't all justice be "vigilante" ?

    Why should The State have a monopoly on force?

  • ||

    In an anarchist society wouldn't all justice be "vigilante" ?

    Not being an anarchist, I can only surmise yes.

  • ||

    Jim Bob, I oppose capital punishment not because I have any objections to it per se. Rather, I distrust the governnments honesty and competence. It's funny that we reach the same policy position starting from such different premises.

  • SIV||

    I oppose capital punishment not because I have any objections to it per se. Rather, I distrust the governnments honesty and competence.


    J sub D


    That is the reason I'm willing to give vigilante
    justice a fair shake

  • ||

    That is the reason I'm willing to give vigilante justice a fair shake

    It would likely be superior in the honesty category, anyway. ;-)

  • ||

    I hate to say this, but this is probably one time that if I'm on the jury, I would think long and hard before convicting the guy. I'm as much a law and order guy myself, but looking at the registry, I can easily see how his rage built up in the first place.

    A better solution would be to put all offenders on the registry in prison for life. Then there would be no problems with parents tempted to protect their children, such as what that guy did.

    Yes, I definitely would vote "not guilty". I would do this for ANYONE who uses the registry if they feel threatened for their children, and undoubtedly most parents feel the same as I do.

    No, I'm not condoning killing anyone outright, but I wouldn't convict anyone of it either, if the killing in my heart is justified. I feel such is so with the case of everyone on the Internet Sex Offender registry.

  • elcid||

    A little late, but i think its important to note that drug dealer registries are actually for the stoners

  • ||

    J sub D,

    Your reason for opposing capital punishment is also mine; the point I made in my second post on this thread was referring specifically to vigilante justice.

    However, I am always torn when it comes to state-ordered capital punishment. Many people smarter and more eloquent than myself have made arguments on both sides of the issue. I always think that perhaps people in favor of the death penalty would feel differently about it if they had to do murder with their own hands, even in the name of justice; the antiseptic long arm of the state execution apparatus, I believes, gives death-penalty supporters a comforting insulation between their support for capital punishment and its grisly processes.

    But still I'm torn; Ted Bundys and Jeffrey Dahmers should pay for their crimes, should they not? Do they languish in prison at taxpayer expense until they die, or do we send them into the void to spare their world their insanity? Always these thoughts lead to useless philosophical musings.

  • ||

    *their world=the world

  • ||

    Peter,

    That is absolutely insane. Think about this! You are saying you'd give people carte blanche to kill, preemptively, "for the children."

    No. No, sir. I cannot believe most parents would feel the way you do. That is madness.

    No, I'm not condoning killing anyone outright...

    Yes, you are. You most certainly are.

  • ||

    Anybody remember the scene from, I think, Naked Gun? "Oh, you killed a gang member? That's a $10 fine."

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