The Old-School Individualist

Independent game designer Jeff Vogel on putting morality into play

The games that Jeff Vogel creates have their share of cool graphics, streamlined interface designs, and other technological elements that were mere fantasies in the early 1980s. Nonetheless, they hark back to the first generation of computer games, when plot and setting were more important than game mechanics. His Avernum series, for example, features a two-dimensional visual display but has a panoply of divergent story lines, all based on choices the player makes as a game character.

This foundation of plot and setting isn’t surprising, because Vogel is also an accomplished writer. He pens first-rate rants for the humor site IronyCentral.com. He wrote a regular column for Computer Games. He serialized a week-by-week, blow-by-blow account of raising his baby on his personal website; Andrews McMeel published it in 2005 as The Poo Bomb: True Tales of Parental Terror. As a literary prank he formed the Scorched Earth Party, the only organization that can make this boast: “We were the first political party to respond to the threat of Barney, and the first to advocate beating those responsible to death with lead pipes.”

An independent game developer in an industry dominated by large companies, Vogel regularly inserts themes of individualism into his work. Avernum takes place in a world where inhabitants of a totalitarian society are banished to a literal underworld for such diverse crimes as treason, inappropriate humor, and loving someone of the same gender. His characters include powerful beings who merely want to be left alone, monsters tragically aware that they have been manipulated for evil ends, and heroes motivated by money as much as any ideal.

I spoke with Vogel via phone in September.

reason: What are the advantages of independent game development?

Jeff Vogel: It’s much the same difference as between, say, indie film and mainstream, blockbuster film. The blockbusters—whether you’re talking about blockbuster games or blockbuster movies—are putting a hundred million dollars into the thing, and you aren’t going to see a lot of risks. Usually, you’re going to see the rough edges and the oddball things sort of sanded down and taken away.

Indie game developers tend to be more of a bunch of eccentric loners who have a dream and bring that to reality. Sometimes that dream isn’t that interesting, but in indie games you are far more likely to find something unusual, or small niche-market things that the larger companies have, by and large, abandoned.

reason: Do you plan to move toward online play?

Vogel: There are a lot of reasons why we’re never, ever going to do that. First off, I’m not a very good programmer. I’m a pretty good game designer, but to create an online sort of game requires a frightening level of resources far beyond what our tiny shop can manage.

On top of that, it’s not really our niche. When you’re a small indie company, generally, to survive, you have to find some small area where you don’t have to be constantly fighting with the big guys and write games to fill that area. You step out of that niche at your peril.

We’ve been writing single-player role-playing games, so I’m competing with practically nobody. There are only one or two decent single-player role-playing games that come out in any given year. If I write a massive multi-player game, I’m competing against people with $50 million budgets, and they will kill me.

Indie game development is a big, growing thing. It’s a chance for people who live in their basements, small people with a dream, to create something, and that’s really catching on. But if you want to do that, you have to know your limits.

reason: The Avernum series doesn’t have simple cookie-cutter outcomes. The adventures carry ethical overtones, both positive and negative, no matter what options you select. Is there something about that ambiguity that appeals to you?

Vogel: Yes. I’m fascinated by politics, and I’m fascinated by the process of how things get done—how ugly and compromised pretty much any dream can become. I have very little patience, in general, with ideas of some people being absolutely good or absolutely bad, or some race of creature being absolutely good or absolutely bad. In The Lord of the Rings, there are these things, and they’re called “orcs,” and they’re all bad, and they’re all evil, and their only purpose is to be killed. I find that to be extremely boring. Whenever I watch The Lord of the Rings, I find myself wondering, “So what are orcs like? Why are they like that?”

Obviously, there are some cases in real life where people are doing things that are all wrong, like the Nazis, or the genocide in Darfur. But most of the time, once you get under the surface, there are a lot of contests between people where either side isn’t absolutely right or absolutely wrong, and I find that a lot more interesting.

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  • egosumabbas||

    While most big-budget games try to railroad you into a plot, there are mercifully some that give you a freedom of choice.

    The Baldur's Gate series comes to mind. There's Second Life (though that doesn't really qualify as a "game").

    The most open-ended one I've played is Oblivion, which was much like it's predecessor Morrowind.

    Though there's something to be said about mindless plotless fun like Katamari Damacy.

  • Joel||

    For those of us who aren't really into RPGs but might want to look at this guy's games, you might have thrown in a URL or something...

  • ||

    Did anyone ever play the Atlas Shrugged game? I can't link to any gaming sites from work, but the reviews were pretty bad IIRC.

  • ||

    Joel, try http://www.spidweb.com. This guy was my DM in college, and it was pretty rollicking. Even then he was into giving characters "interesting" choices.

  • ||

    This guy was my DM in college...

    Holy crap, you outed a D&D-er!

    Intertubz foul!

  • rhywun||

    Indie gaming is where it's at. I've had more fun with free or shareware games lately than the stuff crapped out by the big firms. I guess it helps that I have zero interest in role-playing, fighting, sports, or "life simulation" games.

  • ||

    Ah, Jeff Vogel. A legend by the time I was going to school in Claremont. Also, if you have a child or plan to have one, The Poo Bomb is a must-buy. It was significantly more useful than any of the 'serious' parenting books we bought.

  • perilisk||

    "I guess it helps that I have zero interest in role-playing, fighting, sports, or "life simulation" games."

    But he makes role-playing games...

  • ||

    rhywun,

    Please recommend some free games; I have a lot of time to kill here in the office.

  • ||

    @FrBunny

    The game was 'Bioshock'. It was, as far gaming pleasure, really good. I loved the environment and the plot wasn't so bad. I guess my biggest critique is the way they kind of lampoon Ayn Rand. Basically what happens is there is a Galt's Gulch, in the form of an mid-Atlantic underwater city. Things are great for a while but things go to hell. It uses a lot of the speech of Galt or Roark. While it never really delivers a verdict on Rand or Objectivism I suppose it's not all bad (even if its inferred that the city went to hell because of absolutism), any publicity is good publicity? They have some nice lines in it, so maybe it will leave an impression on some kids.

  • ||

    Ego,

    If you liked Oblivion then I think you will love Fallout 3.

    I've played both and I Fallout 3 is a blast!

  • ||

    Seems like I saw an actual Atlas game though. A 5-minute web search renders me demonstrably incorrect.

    I also heard that about Bioshock. Haven't played it.

  • Paul Eres||

    It's not spiderweb.com, it's spiderwebsoftware.com. I've been a fan of his games for nearly a decade now. I'm also an indie developer and a libertarian, so it's nice to see more interest in indie development here!

  • Paul Eres||

    Also, there was an Atlas Shrugged RPG, yes. It was an amateur game made in RPG Maker, without permission from anyone, and really, really badly made.

  • ||

    VINDICATION!

  • dersk||

    Ah, the Scorched Earth party. Brings back great memories of cave newts and volcanoes.

    dersk, garnished with beak

  • Anon||

    Hey Jeff Vogel, the 70s called and they said they want their glasses and hair back.

  • nfl jerseys||

    ndghjs

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