As a nice companion piece to the horror-chart of debt-to-GDP ratio below, read this cheerfully gloomy Reuters column by Jack Shafer on "Why we vote for liars." Excerpt:

The one presidential candidate in recent memory to win the White House posing as a truth teller was Jimmy Carter, who famously promised early in his campaign: "I'll never tell a lie" and "I'll never knowingly make a misstatement of fact" as president. These promises drew instant fire from the press, most notably Steven Brill, who flayed him in a March 1976 Harper’s piece titled "Jimmy Carter's Pathetic Lies" (subscription required). Carter, who told no fewer lies than the average candidate, paid a political price for his promise, as everyone turned up their radar. "By saying that he would never tell a lie, Carter decided for himself that that's going to be his standard," said Alan Baron, George McGovern's press secretary. "Well, fine, let's hold him to it." [...]

Some of the lies the candidates tell are innocuous and are not held against them, as Kathleen Hall Jamieson and Paul Waldman write in their 2003 book, The Press Effect: Politicians, Journalists, and the Stories that Shape the Political World. For example, "It's great to be in Kansas City" is a completely acceptable lie, as is the platitude, "Nothing is more important to me than the future of our children," Jamieson and Waldman write. Nor do voters care much if candidates claim to have "led the fight" for a piece of legislation if all they did was vote for it or sign it. Moving up the ladder of lying, candidates rarely are forced to pay a political price when they butcher the truth, even in presidential debates. "You can say anything you want during a debate and 80 million people hear it," said Vice President George H.W. Bush's press secretary Peter Teeley in 1984, adding a "so what?" to the fact that reporters might document a candidate's debate lies. "Maybe 200 people read it or 2,000 or 20,000."

Campaigns can survive the most blatant political lies, but candidates must be careful not to lie about themselves – or even appear to lie about themselves[.]

Shafer's depressing, if obvious, kicker:

The pervasiveness of campaign lies tells us something we'd rather not acknowledge, at least not publicly: On many issues, voters prefer lies to the truth. That's because the truth about the economy, the future of Social Security and Medicare, immigration, the war in Afghanistan, taxes, the budget, the deficit and the national debt is too dismal to contemplate. As long as voters cast their votes for candidates who make them feel better, candidates will continue to lie. And to win.

Related content from me: "Obama and the L-Word," and "Obama, Democrats, and the Media: You Can't Handle the 'Truth.'"