Media

Is MTV a Form of Birth Control?

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I've got a new article up at The Daily Beast, about a recent study that purports to show that MTV's 16 and Pregnant and Teen Mom shows caused a significant drop in the teen birth rate. Here are some snippets:

After decades of being slammed by bluenosesbureaucrats, and Bruce Springsteen for sexing up and dumbing down the masses, it turns out that the small screen has accomplished what no amount of promise rings, Twilight movies, or mandatory banana-on-a-condom classes have managed to do: reduce the number of teenage births.

At least that's what the authors of a widely discussed new study say. In "Media Influences on Social Outcomes: The Impact of MTV's 16 and Pregnant on Teen Childbearing," (available online for the low, low price of $5.00 from the National Bureau of Economic Research, economists Melissa S. Kearney (University of Maryland) and Phillip B. Levine (Wellesley College) write "The introduction of 16 and Pregnant along with its partner shows, Teen Mom and Teen Mom 2, led teens to noticeably reduce the rate at which they give birth." According to their calculations, the shows are responsible for "a 5.7 percent reduction in teen births in the 18 months following [their] introduction."…

The study is far less interesting for the specific claims it makes about teen birth rates than it is as a variation on persistent attitudes toward cultural production and consumption redolent of Frankfurt School anxieties over media's impact on the proletariat. In many ways, "Media Influences on Social Outcomes" is simply the latest echo of the idea that TV, music, movies, novels, and the like don't simply move audiences to laughter, tears, or contemplation but compel them to act in particular ways.

Read the whole thing.