One Nation Under Walkie Talkies

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If you were too busy celebrating drug use and the Spanish language to catch The O'Reilly Factor last night, you missed a humdinger of a discussion between O'Reilly and the guy he brings in to make him look sane, Geraldo Rivera. Mouthing off about the Amish killings in Pennsylvania, O'Reilly and Rivera agreed it's time to militarize the schools.

O'REILLY: All I'm saying is that the crime becomes more horrifying and disturbing because there's no signal. You know, if you can be married for 20 years and raised three children in a small community like that and nobody thinks that you're a danger, you don't do anything strange. And then one day you show up and execute five little girls and wound eight others. I mean, that's horrifying in the sense that it's so sudden. And there's no protection against it.

RIVERA: There's no protection except one. No uninvolved adult males walk on that school property, wherever the school is.

O'REILLY: You can set up armed camps. You've got to set up armed camps.

RIVERA: At least give the seniors walkie-talkies and cell phones.

It doesn't get much better than Gen. O'Reilly's call to redeploy the National Guard to Amish country. But the whole wonderful conversation is below the fold.

O'REILLY: Thanks for staying with us. I'm Bill O'Reilly.

In the "Personal Story" segment, last Friday on the "Factor", Geraldo Rivera said this after a 53-year-old Colorado man took six high school girls hostage, killing one of them before killing himself.

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GERALDO RIVERA, HOST, "AT LARGE": What I fear is the starting of the brand new genre in terms of these maniacs acting out on our children and other innocent victims, where they can now fulfill the fantasy.

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O'REILLY: A couple of days later, the Amish thing.

Here he is, star of "Geraldo at Large", Mr. Rivera, who's now a certified oracle.

You know, you don't want these things to come true, but that was eerie. That was an eerie prediction. What was it, less than 48 hours later?

RIVERA: I take no pleasure, obviously, in being right in the prediction. Let me caution that I don't believe this first wave of copycat awareness is over yet. I think there will be, you know—there's an immediacy and urgency now, a need to protect schools, particularly school girls, sororities, day care centers.

For the immediate future in an emergency way, with police, with parent patrols, with a coed situation, the older boys having walkie-talkies and cell phones. I think we have to treat schoolgirls for the immediate future as the most vulnerable and innocent victims for these predators.

I think in the longer range, you know, Bush has—President Bush has the school safety summit next week. We can conceive of long-term ways to increase safety in schools, but for now I want every parent to know that the danger is real and raw.

O'REILLY: Yes, it is. And I think everybody gets the message that we live in a great country, and most Americans are good people, but there's a segment of us that are evil. And that's what this is all about. It's about evil. And we need to recognize the evil.

But Bailey, Colorado, and Bart Township, Pennsylvania, you do not get more peaceful, more rural, more traditional, more family values than these places.

RIVERA: Or lower security. This was the perfect storm. This is the perfect stage for a psycho, sicko deviant to act out their own self destructive fantasies while still fulfilling his sexual obsession.

This is the reason I predicted it would happen again is it's just like suicide bombing. It's a great idea. Having covered crime for 35 years, you know when the criminal, the diabolical criminal masterminds come up with something new under the sun.

This suicide sex predator business was something new under the sun. And it's really scary because it gets their—they get to get their rocks off. They get to have the notoriety that they crave. They fulfill their obsession. They murder and maim and rape and torture and torment. And then they're going to die anyway. Suicide by cop, ultimately, anyways. That's why I fear the danger is immediate, raw and it needs immediate action.

O'REILLY: Now the guy in Colorado was a loser. I mean, he had that written all over him. This guy was bad news. You saw him lurking around. Look, you can tell. There is his picture. You see this guy, you go the other way.

Not the guy in Pennsylvania. This is a guy who's married, had three kids. He's a milkman. He—I mean, we've investigated him. I guess your show has investigated him, as well. There's nothing. Nothing.

RIVERA: But you know, as Congressman Mark Foley is making clear, sex criminals don't always look like that guy Morrison from Colorado. They look like anybody. And that's the danger. I mean, Robertson now is saying, he said in the suicide note how he had molested these two young relatives of his.

O'REILLY: But they can't…

RIVERA: They have. They have located. They announced just before I came on the stage that they have located the children. They haven't had a chance yet to interview them. But the kids are real. Now they're—you know, it's 20 years later, but they recognized that Roberts had…

O'REILLY: We don't know whether he did it, but he certainly was fantasizing.

RIVERA: He says he did it, and he says he was fantasizing about doing it again. He goes in there to stick the place up with KY jelly. I'm telling you, you're not going to grease the wheels or something. There's only one reason.

O'REILLY: No. Now, look, I'm not saying—all I'm saying is that the crime becomes more horrifying and disturbing because there's no signal. You know, if you can be married for 20 years and raised three children in a small community like that and nobody thinks that you're a danger, you don't do anything strange. And then one day you show up and execute five little girls and wound eight others. I mean, that's horrifying in the sense that it's so sudden. And there's no protection against it.

RIVERA: There's no protection except one. No uninvolved adult males walk on that school property, wherever the school is.

O'REILLY: You can set up armed camps. You've got to set up armed camps.

RIVERA: At least give the seniors walkie-talkies and cell phones. In Paradise Township, in the Amish situation, in this massacre, if the 911 call had been placed earlier and the cops had come.

And let me tell you something else, Bill. With the first responders have to do in this is very important. Negotiation, which is the way they do it now, does not work with these psycho predators. Because they have no goal. They take hostages, but the taking of the hostages is the goal. They don't want an airplane to fly to Iran. They don't want the million dollars. The negotiation only prolongs the suffering of the children.

O'REILLY: They think they can talk them out of it. They cannot.

RIVERA: That's my point. They have to recognize that the suicide sex predator is not a traditional hostage taker. His goal is to get to those children and, just like Roberts said, leave me alone. That was his only order. Morrison said that in Colorado. Roberts didn't even respond to the—to the phone call.

All they wanted was the time to do what they had sickly planned in their mind. First responders go, they're in there with those schoolgirls. The key is as soon as they send the little boys out, you know what he's going to do in there. He's there for one reason. He's there to rape.

O'REILLY: You've got to go in.

RIVERA: You've got to go through that window right now. Somebody is going to get hurt. Kids are going to get hurt, as they were in Colorado. One of the six, remember, in that situation. But you've got to go in all the way, full speed, smash it up.

He was disorganized and lost track of his plan when the state trooper went on the P.A. system, not on the phone.

O'REILLY: Yes, they distracted him.

RIVERA: They've got to go now. Go now. Stun guns, smoke bombs, in the window. Where is he? He's the only big guy in there, shoot him down, take them down now. You can't wait. I'm telling you. What you'll do is you'll come to regret it. You'll have that…

O'REILLY: You're a good, old-fashioned liberal from many years.

RIVERA: Radical.

O'REILLY: Radical leftist, you know, Bobby Seal Rivera (ph). Do you believe in the concept of good and evil in this world?

RIVERA: I do indeed. And I also believe in karma. I think that evil will come back to bite you in the end.

O'REILLY: But, you know, this cases, these two guys, it killed them, but they did so much damage.

RIVERA: They committed…

O'REILLY: So you do believe in the concept of evil?

RIVERA: Oh, yes.

O'REILLY: Because A lot of secular progressives don't.

RIVERA: Hitler was evil. Hitler was fundamentally, organically evil. There's—there's a trick gene, I think, that makes—distinguishes the criminal who is out for personal gain, reward, gratification, or whatever and someone who wants to inflict that kind of misery.

There's something that's organically DNA different, I think. I really do believe that there is—there is a good and there is an evil. God is a different question. You and debate that all day and night. But good and evil, I have no doubt.

O'REILLY: All right. Geraldo Rivera, thank you very much, as always. We appreciate it.

Directly ahead, a 3-week-old baby girl caught in a legal fight involving her mother, unfortunately, Anna Nicole Smith. The man who says he's the father. Legal battle over the baby, in a moment.