The Clinton campaign: Where bad spin goes to die.

Senator Evan Bayh of Indiana, who backs Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton for president, proposed another gauge Sunday by which superdelegates might judge whether to support Mrs. Clinton or Senator Barack Obama.

He suggested that they consider the electoral votes of the states that each of them has won.

“So who carried the states with the most Electoral College votes is an important factor to consider because ultimately, that’s how we choose the president of the United States,” Mr. Bayh said on CNN’s “Late Edition.”

His candidate, you'll recall, is a die-hard supporter of the Electoral College. Um...

Senator-elect Hillary Rodham Clinton began a victory tour of upstate New York Friday by calling for elimination of the Electoral College.

At an airport news conference, the first lady said she would support legislation seeking a constitutional amendment providing for the direct election of the president.

To be fair, Clinton was arguing that at a point when it was politically advantageous. Now, arguing for the Electoral College as the no-frills determinent of success is politically advantageous. It's the latest phony argument to Trojan Horse over the real case against Obama: that he can't win the election because the country is mostly white and Obama's lost his race transcending Infinity Gem.

If Clinton cudgels Obama and takes the nomination, why does she think she can still win this thing? Is she counting on John McCain to be revealed as a member of a radical black church? We probably would have found that out by now.

The New York senator said the panel should be led by financial experts such as Robert Rubin, who was treasury secretary in her husband's administration, and former Federal Reserve chairmen Alan Greenspan and Paul Volcker.

UPDATE: This is less inconsistent, but still pretty silly. Clinton today:

Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton called on President Bush on Monday to appoint "an emergency working group on foreclosures" to recommend new ways to confront the nation's housing finance troubles.

The New York senator said the panel should be led by financial experts such as Robert Rubin, who was treasury secretary in her husband's administration, and former Federal Reserve chairmen Alan Greenspan and Paul Volcker.

That would be this Robert Rubin:

The company of errant, if lavishly compensated, navigators includes none other than Rubin himself. Last fall, the former Treasury secretary confessed to Fortune magazine that until the mortgage storms broke over his head in the summer of 2007, he was unfamiliar with the kinds of complex mortgage structures with which Citi's own balance sheet was packed. Almost certainly, the gulf between competence and compensation on Wall Street has never been wider.

If Clinton was forming a committee on winning baseball games, I assume she'd appoint Bill Buckner.