Happy Thanksgiving! According to a new study, you and your family are increasingly less likely to have cancer, and less likely to die of it, too:

Cancer diagnosis rates decreased by an average of 0.8 percent each year from 1999 to 2005, the last year for which data are available, according to an annual report by the National Cancer Institute, the American Cancer Society and other scientific organizations.

Death rates from cancer continued to decline as well, a trend that began some 15 years ago, the report also noted. It was published online in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

For all those who live in fear of GM foods, plastic water bottles, aspartame, food miles, and cellphones—relax, have a nice dinner, and call your Great Aunt Freida. Statistically speaking, you'll live.

In related news, the always-valuable American Council on Science and Health reminds us that all the components of a delicious Thanksgiving dinner are safe to eat, even if they cause cancer in the occasional lab rat.

And the always-entertaining John Tierney gives us a list of 10 things not to worry about over the summer. Revisit the list, and enjoy not worrying again this holiday season.