Reason Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/ Founded in 1968, Reason is the planet’s leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Hosted by Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, and other Reason journalists, our podcast explores “free minds and free markets.” It features provocative, in-depth interviews with authors, comedians, filmmakers, musicians, economists, scientists, business leaders, and elected officials. Keep up to date on the latest happenings in our increasingly libertarian world from a point of view you won’t get from legacy media and boring old left-right, liberal-conservative publications. You can also find video versions at Reason.com/reasontv. Fri, 26 Apr 2019 16:53:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 Founded in 1968, Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Hosted by Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch and other Reason journalists, our podcast explores "free minds and free markets." It features provocative, in-depth interviews with authors, comedians, filmmakers, musicians, economists, scientists, business leaders, and elected officials. Keep up to date on the latest happenings in our increasingly libertarian world from a point of view you won't get from legacy media and boring old left-right, liberal-conservative publications. You can also find video versions at Reason.com. Reason.com yes episodic Reason.com podcasts@reason.com podcasts@reason.com (Reason.com) ReasonTV: Home of the Drew Carey Project and other libertarian videos. Reason Podcast https://reason.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/podcast_logo_soundcloud.jpg https://reason.com/podcast/ podcasts@reason.com Founded in 1968, Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Hosted by Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Matt Welch, and other Reason journalists, our podcast explores &amp;amp;amp;amp;quot;free minds and free markets.&amp;amp;amp;amp;quot; It features provocative, in-depth interviews with authors, comedians, filmmakers, musicians, economists, scientists, business leaders, and elected officials. Keep up to date on the latest happenings in our increasingly libertarian world from a point of view you won't get from staid left-right, liberal-conservative publications. Emily Oster Will Help You Be a Better, More Statistically Literate Parent https://reason.com/podcast/emily-oster-will-help-you-be-a-better-more-statistically-literate-parent/ Wed, 24 Apr 2019 14:30:59 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8002028 https://reason.com/podcast/emily-oster-will-help-you-be-a-better-more-statistically-literate-parent/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/emily-oster-will-help-you-be-a-better-more-statistically-literate-parent/feed/ 4 Emily Oster is the parenting guru nerds have been waiting for. In her previous book, Expecting Better, Oster blew up<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/emily-oster-will-help-you-be-a-better-more-statistically-literate-parent/">...</a> Emily Oster is the parenting guru nerds have been waiting for. In her previous book, Expecting Better, Oster blew up the conventional wisdom around pregnancy using her training as an economist to dig into the academic literature on questions about what pregnant women can safely eat and drink, along with a variety of other hot-button topics. She was hailed (and occasionally vilified) for her finding that the occasional glass of wine or order of sushi did not pose a mortal danger to most uterus-dwellers.

In her new book, Cribsheet, the Brown University economist examines the evidence on best practices for babies and toddlers. Her advice for parents of the 0–3 crowd on breastfeeding, swaddling, toddler discipline, and more offers the same level of data-driven chill her fans have grown to expect.

In a wide-ranging podcast with Editor in Chief Katherine Mangu-Ward, Oster explains how to tell a good study from a bad one and why she thinks it's important to help people make the best decisions for their families rather than assume there's a single right answer.

As a bonus, she also breaks down that much-publicized study about eggs and offers some reassuring evidence that it's OK to keep having those omelets for breakfast, no matter what you might have heard.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

 

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Emily Oster is the parenting guru nerds have been waiting for. In her previous book, Expecting Better, Oster blew up... Emily Oster is the parenting guru nerds have been waiting for. In her previous book, Expecting Better, Oster blew up... Reason.com 40:37
The 26 Words That 'Created the Internet'—and Why They May Be on the Chopping Block https://reason.com/podcast/the-26-words-that-created-the-internet-and-why-they-may-be-on-the-chopping-block/ Tue, 23 Apr 2019 18:30:56 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8001934 https://reason.com/podcast/the-26-words-that-created-the-internet-and-why-they-may-be-on-the-chopping-block/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/the-26-words-that-created-the-internet-and-why-they-may-be-on-the-chopping-block/feed/ 26 Psst…do you want to know the 26 words that, in the opinion of today's guest on the Reason Podcast, "created<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/the-26-words-that-created-the-internet-and-why-they-may-be-on-the-chopping-block/">...</a> Psst…do you want to know the 26 words that, in the opinion of today's guest on the Reason Podcast, "created the internet?"

No provider or user of an interactive computer service shall be treated as the publisher or speaker of any information provided by another information content provider.

That's part of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a federal law that was passed in 1996, as part of a larger piece of legislation updating telecommunications regulations. Section 230 grants broad immunity to websites and internet service providers from legal actions such as being sued for libel and defamation. It's the reason why Reason can't be sued for libelous or defamatory content posted in our comments section (though the authors of such comments can be).

Section 230 is the law that has enabled the internet to become driven by user-generated content, from YouTube videos to Yelp reviews to basically all of Twitter. You get rid of Section 230 and all that—and much more—is toast. In its first decade, Section 230 was mostly celebrated for allowing free expression and new economic models, but these days it is under attack from conservative Republicans such as Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley and from liberal Democrats such as Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, all of whom have expressed interest in ripping up Section 230 and regulating social media.

Today's guest Jeff Kosseff is sweating bullets over all this. A former journalist who has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize, he teaches law and cybersecurity at the United States Naval Academy and is the author of the urgent new book, The Twenty-Six Words That Created the Internet. In a wide-ranging conversation, Kosseff tells Nick Gillespie about the unlikely partnership between a conservative Republican (former Rep. Chris Cox of California) and a liberal Democrat (future Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon) in the mid-1990s that gave rise to Section 230; why today's internet is "unimaginable" without it; how the European Union's approach to online speech is incompatible with America's; and why we might be witnessing the death not just of Section 230 but of the free speech ethos of the internet and World Wide Web. Kosseff tells Gillespie that he started out writing "a biography" of Section 230 but is now worried that he in fact has written "an obituary" for it.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Links related to today's podcast:

The Twenty-Six Words that Created the Internet, by Jeff Kosseff

Jeff Kosseff's faculty page at the United States Naval Academy

"Nancy Pelosi Declares a 'New Era' of Internet Regulation; E.U. Threatens Same," by Nick Gillespie

"Mark Zuckerberg Calls for Government Regulation of Political Speech on Facebook," by Nick Gillespie

"Sen. Josh Hawley Rails Against 'Big Tech,' Anti-Conservative Bias, and Section 230," by Robby Soave

"4 Cases That Show the Scope of Services, Speech, and Conduct Protected by Section 230," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

 

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Psst…do you want to know the 26 words that, in the opinion of today's guest on the Reason Podcast, "created... Psst…do you want to know the 26 words that, in the opinion of today's guest on the Reason Podcast, "created... Reason.com 41:26
What Did Libertarians Learn from the Mueller Report? https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-libertarians-learn-from-the-mueller-report/ Mon, 22 Apr 2019 19:00:59 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8001695 https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-libertarians-learn-from-the-mueller-report/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-libertarians-learn-from-the-mueller-report/feed/ 33 Now that the smoke has cleared from the Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Donald Trump's suspected (and now-disregarded) criminal<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-libertarians-learn-from-the-mueller-report/">...</a> Now that the smoke has cleared from the Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Donald Trump's suspected (and now-disregarded) criminal conspiracy with Russia and his potential obstruction of the investigation thereof, there are many questions that still remain, including: Should we be alarmed by the role that counterterrorism-investigation leaks played in kickstarting this investigation? Are there specific trims to government power that this whole episode suggests, and if so why aren't they being discussed? Is it useful to have conversations about having conversations about conversations?

All of these riddles and more are hotly debated on this week's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, betwixt Katherine Mangu-WardNick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch. The episode also features a name-that-Democratic-candidate pop quiz, a quick round of Biden-kicking, and—yes, nerds (sigh)—some discussion of that television show from last night.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Lies Rise' by Cullah is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"What's Really in the Mueller Report," by Scott Shackford

"Trump May Not Be Guilty of Obstruction, but He Is Guilty of Arrogant Stupidity," by Jacob Sullum

"Trump May Not Have Obstructed the Mueller Investigation, but It Sure Looks Like He Tried," by Peter Suderman

"In Defense of Trump Obstructing Justice (When There's No Underlying Crime)," by Nick Gillespie

"If Either Party Cared About Limiting Executive Power, Trump's Presidency Would Be Toast," by Eric Boehm

"Standing on the Shoulders of Tyrants," by Gene Healy

"The CBO Was Created to Provide a Check on Executive Power," by Peter Suderman

"Joe Biden Is Probably Running for President. He's Got a Lot of Baggage." by Christian Britschgi

"Joe Biden Says He Didn't Do Anything Wrong, Will Do Better From Now On," by Christian Britschgi

"Hair-Sniffer Joe Biden Should Apologize for His Whole Career," by Matt Welch

"All the Top Democrats Running for President Favor Legalizing Marijuana," by Matt Welch

"Elizabeth Warren Wants You To Know She Totally Loves Game of Thrones. Especially Daenerys. Yay, Women!" by Robby Soave

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Now that the smoke has cleared from the Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Donald Trump's suspected (and now-disregarded) criminal... Now that the smoke has cleared from the Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Donald Trump's suspected (and now-disregarded) criminal... Reason.com 1:06:42
What Will Post-Prohibition Drug Culture Look Like? https://reason.com/podcast/what-will-post-prohibition-drug-culture-look-like/ Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:15:33 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8001215 https://reason.com/podcast/what-will-post-prohibition-drug-culture-look-like/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/what-will-post-prohibition-drug-culture-look-like/feed/ 8 With the rise of legal recreational marijuana across the country and an unwinding of the drug war on the horizon,<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/what-will-post-prohibition-drug-culture-look-like/">...</a> With the rise of legal recreational marijuana across the country and an unwinding of the drug war on the horizon, more and more people are thinking about how best to shape America's post-prohibition drug culture. What sorts of institutions, attitudes, and practices will help us figure out which chemicals we want to ingest to make ourselves happier, more productive, and more fulfilled? How do we best educate ourselves about the risks and rewards of better living through chemistry when everything from acid to Zoloft is legally in our home medicine cabinets?

Today's guest is working to stage that conversation. Sarah Rose Siskind, who was the head writer on the Reason TV series Mostly Weekly, hosts a monthly show called Drug Test at New York's Caveat theater. Each episode features a different drug—magic mushrooms, most recently—and scientists, researchers, and counselors discussing a particular substance's chemistry, history, and associated rituals. There's also footage of a "VIP" or "very intoxicated person" who performs a variety of mental and physical tests before and after ingesting the drug in question. The result is a frank, smart, and fun discussion of how we might all navigate the world after the drug war.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Links related to today's podcast:

Drug Test with Sarah Rose Siskind on Facebook

Caveat NYC

MAPS: Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies

How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence, by Michael Pollan

Trip: Psychedelics, Alienation, and Changeby Tao Lin

Hamilton's Pharmacopeia, on Viceland

 

 

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With the rise of legal recreational marijuana across the country and an unwinding of the drug war on the horizon,... With the rise of legal recreational marijuana across the country and an unwinding of the drug war on the horizon,... Reason.com 51:38
Surprise: Virtually All Presidential Candidates (Including Trump) Are Good on Pot Legalization https://reason.com/podcast/surprise-virtually-all-presidential-candidates-including-trump-are-good-on-pot-legalization/ Wed, 17 Apr 2019 17:03:19 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8000712 https://reason.com/podcast/surprise-virtually-all-presidential-candidates-including-trump-are-good-on-pot-legalization/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/surprise-virtually-all-presidential-candidates-including-trump-are-good-on-pot-legalization/feed/ 7 One of the most amazing aspects of the 2020 presidential race is that virtually all candidates, including President Donald Trump,<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/surprise-virtually-all-presidential-candidates-including-trump-are-good-on-pot-legalization/">...</a> One of the most amazing aspects of the 2020 presidential race is that virtually all candidates, including President Donald Trump, have indicated they favor letting individual states decide the legal status of marijuana. That position was unthinkable even a few years ago, Reason Senior Editor Jacob Sullum tells Nick Gillespie in the latest Reason Podcast.

Sullum, the author of Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use (2004) and an award-winning writer on drug policy, also discusses the difficulties in measuring what comprises "stoned driving," whether smoking pot leads to opioid use, the places in America where you can still get locked up for possessing weed, and which southern state will be the first to legalize recreational marijuana.

This podcast is part of Reason's "Weed Week" coverage. Go here for all our stories.

Stories related to today's podcast:
"Pot Can Earn You Profits or a Prison Sentence," by Jacob Sullum

"Is Marijuana a Gateway to Opioids?," by Jacob Sullum

"Cory Booker Knocks Presidential Rivals for Joking About Marijuana," by Jacob Sullum

"Attorney General Barr Prefers Marijuana Federalism Over the Current Confusing Mess," by Eric Boehm
"New Mexico Makes History with Weed and Paraphernalia Decriminalization Bill," by Zuri Davis

 

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One of the most amazing aspects of the 2020 presidential race is that virtually all candidates, including President Donald Trump,... One of the most amazing aspects of the 2020 presidential race is that virtually all candidates, including President Donald Trump,... Reason.com 47:05
Happy Taxation-Is-Theft Day! https://reason.com/podcast/happy-taxation-is-theft-day-podcast/ Mon, 15 Apr 2019 19:45:08 +0000 https://reason.com/?post_type=podcast&p=8000258 https://reason.com/podcast/happy-taxation-is-theft-day-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/happy-taxation-is-theft-day-podcast/feed/ 10 Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) is engaging in some mildly awkward conversations about being a millionaire while constantly seeking to soak<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/happy-taxation-is-theft-day-podcast/">...</a> Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) is engaging in some mildly awkward conversations about being a millionaire while constantly seeking to soak the rich. Which on this Tax Day, is kind of hilarious, so it's how we start this week's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-WardNick Gillespie, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch.

The gang talks this year's tax-refund confusions, Democrats' fuzzy tax math, Uncle Milty's greatest #fail, presidential-candidate tax disclosures, the gruesomely intrusive Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), and much more. Also under discussion: the forthcoming Mueller Report drop, Julian Assange's beard, Raymond Chandler's vocabulary, Reason's schmancy new website, and how all the nerds in Washington were watching Game of Thrones last night.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes.

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Mozart—Eine Kleine Nachtmusik allegro' by Advent Chamber Orchestra is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Nobody Thinks They've Gotten a Recent Tax Cut, but a Majority Have," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Happy Tax Day! Here Are 6 Infuriating Ways the Government Spends Your Money," by Joe Setyon

"I Got Stoned and Did My Taxes," by Liz Wolfe

"Starve the Tax Man," by J.D. Tuccille

"The Rise of the Low-Tax Socialists," by Peter Suderman

"Democrats Hate Wealthy Candidates…When They're Not Democrats," by Matt Welch

"Milton Friedman Helped Invent Income Tax Withholding," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Americans Keep Setting New Records for Renouncing Citizenship, and Tax Reform Threatens to Make it Worse," by Matt Welch

"The Coming Transparency Battle Over the Mueller Report," by C.J. Ciaramella

"MoveOn, Maddow Can't Move on From Mueller Worship," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Julian Assange and WikiLeaks Deserve Our Thanks for Making Governments More Transparent," by Nick Gillespie

"Julian Assange Is a Better Journalist Than Many of His Media Critics," by J.D. Tuccille

"Punishing Assange Isn't Worth Killing a Free Press," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"The Washington Establishment Seems Pretty Happy About Julian Assange's Arrest," by Joe Setyon

"What Game of Thrones Can Teach Us About Political Power," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) is engaging in some mildly awkward conversations about being a millionaire while constantly seeking to soak... Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) is engaging in some mildly awkward conversations about being a millionaire while constantly seeking to soak... Reason.com 1:02:17
What Game of Thrones Can Teach Us About Political Power https://reason.com/podcast/got-podcast/ Fri, 12 Apr 2019 19:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/?p=366909 https://reason.com/podcast/got-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/got-podcast/feed/ 36 In a special episode of the <em>Reason Podcast</em>, we drink and we know things. On Sunday night at 9 p.m., Game of Thrones returns to HBO. And here at Reason, we are ready.

Join Reason editors Peter Suderman, Robby Soave, and yours truly as we rip apart the first seven seasons of Game of Thrones like a hungry baby dragon snacking on a sheep. In this very special SPOILER-FILLED episode of the podcast, the magazine's resident draconologists ask what Game of Thrones teaches us about political power.

Robby Soave reveals why he's a Daenerys hater, Peter Suderman has some ideas about fiscal discipline in Westeros, and I get excited about what's for dinner in King's Landing. We also shamefully give in to the temptation to draw parallels between 2020 American politics and a quasi-medieval fantasy world invented by George R.R. Martin in the 1990s. What does their wall in the North mean for our wall in the South? Is Pete Buttigieg actually Peter Baelish? Are the white walkers global warming? And does Varys have an office on K Street?

In the end, we drink, we know things, and all agree that we're moving to Braavos.

(P.S. If you want to get your libertarian Game of Thrones itch scratched further, consider joining me on June 20 in D.C. when I emcee the Competitive Enterprise Institute's annual dinner.)

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

Subscribe at Apple Podcasts.

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In a special episode of the Reason Podcast, we drink and we know things. In a special episode of the Reason Podcast, we drink and we know things. Reason.com yes 58:49
John McWhorter: America Has Never Been Less Racist https://reason.com/podcast/america-has-never-been-less-racist-and-m/ Thu, 11 Apr 2019 16:24:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/04/11/america-has-never-been-less-racist-and-m/ https://reason.com/podcast/america-has-never-been-less-racist-and-m/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/america-has-never-been-less-racist-and-m/feed/ 126 The Columbia University linguist discusses the Jussie Smollett hoax, Donald Trump, and "antiracism" as a new secular religion. When actor Jussie Smollet lied about being attacked by racist, MAGA-hat-wearing Trump supporters, Columbia University linguist John McWhorter actually interpreted it as a sign that "we have come further on race than we are often comfortable admitting."

"Only in an America in which matters of race are not as utterly irredeemable as we are often told," he wrote in The Atlantic, would someone "pretend to be tortured in this way…[because] playing a singer on television is not as glamorous as getting beaten up by white guys."

The unwillingness of both blacks and whites to acknowledge progress on racial equality is a long-running theme for McWhorter, who in 2000 published Losing the Race: Self-Sabotage in Black America, which argued that "in most cases, [racism] is not an obstacle to people being the best that they can be."

In an influential 2015 essay, McWhorter argued that "Antiracism" had become a new secular religion in America, complete with "clergy, creed, and also even a conception of Original Sin."

"One is born marked by original sin," he wrote. "To be white is to be born with the stain of unearned privilege." Black people, he continued, "will express their grievances and whites will agree" that they are racist. On the right, McWhorter observed, there is a growing sense of hostility on racial issues and, according to Gallup, the percentage of Americans who agree that black-white relations are good is at a 20-year low. And for the first time since the pollster has asked the question, a majority of blacks rate race relations as bad.

I sat down with the 53-year-old McWhorter—the author or editor of 20 books—to talk about his upbringing in a mixed-race part of Philadelphia, his academic focus on Creole language, and the unmistakable signs of racial progress that an increasing number of Americans seem unwilling to acknowledge.

Edited by Ian Keyser. Intro by Todd Krainin. Cameras by Jim Epstein and Kevin Alexander.

Photos by Jim Epstein.

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The Columbia University linguist discusses the Jussie Smollett hoax, Donald Trump, and "antiracism" as a new secular religion. The Columbia University linguist discusses the Jussie Smollett hoax, Donald Trump, and "antiracism" as a new secular religion. Reason.com yes 44:06
Is the Phrase 'Open Borders' a Libertarian Mistake? https://reason.com/podcast/is-open-borders-a-mistake/ Mon, 08 Apr 2019 19:45:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/04/08/is-open-borders-a-mistake/ https://reason.com/podcast/is-open-borders-a-mistake/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/is-open-borders-a-mistake/feed/ 93 As Trump cracks down yet again, <em>Reason</em>'s editors disagree over labeling in immigration policy. The past 24 hours have seen two unrelated events tethered to America's ever-contentious immigration debates: (1) President Donald Trump reportedly forcing out Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, on the grounds that she somehow wasn't tough enough, and (2) the launch announcement by pals o' Reason Bryan Caplan and Zach Weinersmith of their new graphic nonfiction paperback Open Borders: The Science and Ethics of Immigration. (Pre-order here!)

So what happens if you mash up these two events? Well, if you're the Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, you get into a spirited debate over whether the phrase "open borders" actually describes your immigration worldview, let alone is an effective way of selling it. Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman and yours truly argue about that, plus President Donald Trump's interest in increasing family separations, whether the phrase "military-industrial complex" is for hippies, and how a show with a name like Love, Death & Robots could have managed to escape Katherine's attention.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'When You're Gone' by Bombay Laughing Club is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Is Leaving Wednesday. Will Her Replacement Be Worse?" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Kirstjen Nielsen and John Kelly Keep Lying About 'Zero Tolerance' and Child Snatching, While Donald Trump Tells the Truth," by Jacob Sullum

"Trump Says Kidnapping Unauthorized Immigrants' Children Is an Effective Deterrent," by Jacob Sullum

"Child Separation Policy at Border Led to Procedural, Personal Chaos, Says Inspector General Report," by Brian Doherty

"Bryan Caplan's New Book on Open Borders," by Ilya Somin

"Bernie Sanders Reminds Voters That He Is Absolutely Against Open Borders," by Robby Soave

"Debate: Nations Can and Should Control Their Borders," by Jonathan H. Adler and Shikha Dalmia

"Rand Paul and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Found Something They Can Agree On," by Joe Setyon

"Trump Ain't Dismantling the American Empire," by Shikha Dalmia

"Sens. Rand Paul, Tom Udall Introduce Bill to End the War in Afghanistan," by Christian Britschgi

"Washington Imperialists Fret Over Trump's Troop Withdrawals," by Matt Welch

"Netflix's Love, Death and Robots Is a Sci-Fi Demo Reel For the Untapped Potential of Animation," by Peter Suderman

"Bret Easton Ellis on American Psycho, Hollywood Hypocrisy, and the Excesses of #MeToo," by Nick Gillespie and Paul Detrick

Don't miss a single Reason Podcast! (Archive here.)

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As Trump cracks down yet again, Reason's editors disagree over labeling in immigration policy. As Trump cracks down yet again, Reason's editors disagree over labeling in immigration policy. Reason.com yes 1:07:03
The Yale Professor Attacked by Angry Students Over Halloween Costumes Believes Evolution Wants Us To Get Along https://reason.com/podcast/the-yale-professor-attacked-by-angry-stu/ Fri, 05 Apr 2019 21:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/04/05/the-yale-professor-attacked-by-angry-stu/ https://reason.com/podcast/the-yale-professor-attacked-by-angry-stu/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/the-yale-professor-attacked-by-angry-stu/feed/ 102 In <em>Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society</em>, Nicholas Christakis says our common humanity outweighs divisive tribalism. In 2015, an angry confrontation at Yale over how to dress up on Halloween caused a national sensation. Protesting students called for the university to fire Nicholas Christakis, a sociologist and physician, because they felt he and his wife, also teaching at Yale at the time, did not protect them from possible psychic injury.

The conflict started a week earlier, when the school's Intercultural Affairs Council sent an email encouraging members of the community to be careful not to offend their fellow students with culturally and racially insensitive costumes. Christakis' wife, Erika—an expert in early childhood education—responded with her own thoughts. "Is there no room anymore for a child or young person to be a little bit obnoxious…a little bit inappropriate or provocative or, yes, offensive," she wrote. From her perspective, American universities had "become places of censure and prohibition."

Students said that by sending her email, Erica Christakis had failed to create a safe space at Yale's Sillman College, where she served as associate master. Nicholas Christakis jumped into the fray, defending his wife's email, and he tried to engage in a dialogue with protestors in a courtyard. Scenes of students shouting at Nicholas and calling for his firing went viral.

Christakis not only held on to his tenured professorship, but three years later he was awarded the Sterling Professorship, Yale's highest faculty honor. And his confrontation with students kicked off an ongoing national debate about freedom of speech, political correctness, and sensitivity on college campuses.

As a sociologist, the 56-year-old Christakis is no stranger to highly charged group interactions. His new book is Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society, which argues that our genetic makeup predisposes us to favor peaceful interaction and respectful co-existence over angry and violent mob rules.

Nick Gillespie sat down with Christakis to talk about his theory that what unites as humans is stronger than what divides us, the power of evolution as an explanatory system for society, and whether Enlightenment values such as civil discourse and intellectual freedom are still respected in our nation's colleges and universities.

Edited by Ian Keyser. Intro by Todd Krainin. Cameras by Jim Epstein and Kevin Alexander.

Music credit: 'Voyeur' by Jingle Punks

Photos by Ragesoss and Sibjeet, under a creative commons license.

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In Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society, Nicholas Christakis says our common humanity outweighs divisive tribalism. In Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society, Nicholas Christakis says our common humanity outweighs divisive tribalism. Reason.com yes 31:43
What Brothels Can Teach All of Us About Risk https://reason.com/podcast/allison-schrager-podcast/ Wed, 03 Apr 2019 16:20:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/04/03/allison-schrager-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/allison-schrager-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/allison-schrager-podcast/feed/ 7 Allison Schrager's <em>An Economist Walks Into a Brothel</em> demystifies sex work, big-wave surfing, horse-breeding, and other high-risk professions. Just when you might have thought that economics was played out as a way for us to understand the world, along comes Allison Schrager, a Ph.D. economist who writes for Quartz, teaches at New York University, and is the co-founder of LifeCycle Finance Partners, a risk-advisory firm.

She's the author of the provocative new book, An Economist Walks Into a Brothel: And Other Unexpected Places To Understand Risk. In the opening chapter, Schrager describes spending time at Nevada's famous Moonlite Bunny Ranch and learning how both sex workers and customers pay a premium to minimize and manage all sorts of risks involved in legal prostitution (the prostitutes don't have to worry about screening potential customers or being arrested, for instance, and the johns don't have to worry about being ripped off, blackmailed, or catching a disease). She hangs out with paparazzi who stalk celebrities for high-value candid photographs worth tens of thousands of dollars but more often end up with no pictures at all. She attends an annual conference where big-wave surfers share information and new ideas about minimizing potentially deadly risks inherent in their sport. Other chapters cover professional poker players, horse breeders, a major battle in the 1991 Iraq War, and more.

Schrager combines an economist's analytic framework with a journalist's eye for detail and narrative, resulting in a book that is both difficult to put down and helpful when it comes to managing the risks we face every day, from planning for retirement to switching jobs to thinking about romantic relationships. An Economist Walks Into a Brothel also carries with it an implicitly—and at times explicitly—libertarian message about intentionality and responsibility when it comes to living life to the fullest. Schrager notes that there's no way to fully eliminate risk in our lives but that by using tools provided by financial economics, we "can make better choices and reduce risk."

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Allison Schrager's An Economist Walks Into a Brothel demystifies sex work, big-wave surfing, horse-breeding, and other high-risk professions. Allison Schrager's An Economist Walks Into a Brothel demystifies sex work, big-wave surfing, horse-breeding, and other high-risk professions. Reason.com yes 46:07
Hair-Sniffer Joe Biden Should Apologize for His Whole Career: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/hair-sniffer-joe-biden-should-apologize/ Mon, 01 Apr 2019 19:15:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/04/01/hair-sniffer-joe-biden-should-apologize/ https://reason.com/podcast/hair-sniffer-joe-biden-should-apologize/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/hair-sniffer-joe-biden-should-apologize/feed/ 87 A real American genius Joe is not. ||| The Drudge Report
The Drudge Report

"Joe Biden Is Probably Running for President," runs the first half of this Christian Britschgi headline from two weeks ago. "He's Got a Lot of Baggage."

Does he ever.

A good rule of thumb is that you don't want to pre-launch your presidential campaign with Associated Press headlines about how you "never meant to make women feel uncomfortable," but that's where the former vice president and longtime U.S. senator from Delaware finds himself this week. But let's not sleep on a decades-long career of not just talking real funny about Others and plagiarizing a dog's breakfast of material, but also backing some of the worst federal policies the late 20th century Democratic Party could concoct. Or so argue Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and yours truly on today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast.

Also up for discussion: President Donald Trump's potentially calamitous threat to close the southern border, Mark Zuckerburg's potentially calamitous suggestions for regulating the internet, and Peter Suderman's definitely calamitous obsession with Blade Runner.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Music credit: 'Viva Mexico—Viva America' by Pedro Galindo; El Mariachi Tapatio Marmolejo

Relevant links from the show:

"Joe Biden Is Probably Running for President. He's Got a Lot of Baggage," by Christian Britschgi

"Creepy Joe Biden: A Living Argument for Keeping Politicians on a Leash," by J.D. Tuccille

"Rather Than Running for President, Maybe Joe Biden Should Just Launch an Apology Tour," by Scott Shackford

"The Iraq War Was the Biggest Foreign Policy Mistake in Decades. Biden Voted For It. Sanders Did Not," by Robby Soave

"Joe Biden is So Much of What's Wrong With the Democratic Party," by Ed Krayewski

"Just How Bad Would Joe Biden Be as President? Really F*cking Bad," by Nick Gillespie

"Joe Biden Remains Anti-Legalization: I'm the Guy Who Gave You a Drug Czar," by Ed Krayewski

"Law Championed by Joe Biden Leads to More Ecstasy Deaths," by Ed Krayewski

"Remember Joe Biden's Fearless Leadership in the Iraq War Debate? Me Neither," by Damon Root

"Q: Why did Obama Pick VP To Take Lead in Picking New Supreme Court Justice? A: Biden May Be a Rule-Breaker Who Stands Up While Riding on Amtrak, Lies About Where He Eats Breakfast, Cheated in College, and Plagiarizes Nearly Every Time He Opens His Yap…," by Nick Gillespie

"Reason.tv Salutes Joe Biden, Real Man of Genius," by Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, and Reason TV

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A real American genius Joe is not. A real American genius Joe is not. Reason.com yes 1:04:19
Does Middle East Peace Require a Two-State Solution or a Palestinian Defeat? A Debate https://reason.com/podcast/israel-palestine-debate/ Fri, 29 Mar 2019 16:45:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/29/israel-palestine-debate/ https://reason.com/podcast/israel-palestine-debate/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/israel-palestine-debate/feed/ 43 Should Israel negotiate with Hamas and Fatah, or are they unwavering enemies in a protracted struggle? "To resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Israel must first achieve defeat of the Palestinian movement."

That was the topic of a debated hosted by the Soho Forum on March 18, 2019. It was an Oxford-style debate, in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious.

Brett Raney

For the affirmative, Elan Journo, a fellow and director of policy research at the Ayn Rand Institute, argued that the Palestinian movement is irreedemably corrupt and must be defeated as a necessary condition to achieve peace. The P.L.O. and Hamas have a long history of inciting terrorism and suicide attacks, and they aremore concerned with destroying Israel than with winning justice and prosperity for the Palestinian people, he argued. The defeat of the movement will require a coalition of governments to wage a sustained campaign of economic, diplomatic, and military efforts.

Danny Sjursen, a U.S. Army strategist and former history instructor at West Point, rejected Journo's characterization of the Palestinian movement. He argued that most Palestinian organizations, including Hamas, are more willing than ever to make reasonable compromises for peace, accept a two-state solution, and at least tacitly recognize Israel's right to exist. The only way to achieve a lasting solution to the middle east crisis is to treat the Palestinian leadership as potential negotiating partners.

Sjursen prevailed by convincing about 14 percent of audience members to change their minds.

Brett Raney

Journo's latest book is What Justice Demands: America and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict. He is co-author of Failing to Confront Islamic Totalitarianism: From George W. Bush to Barack Obama and Beyond and editor of Winning the Unwinnable War: America's Self-Crippled Response to Islamic Totalitarianism.

Sjursen served tours with reconnaissance units in both Iraq and Afghanistan. He has written for The Nation and The American Conservative, he is the author of a memoir and critical analysis of the Iraq War, Ghostriders of Baghdad: Soldiers, Civilians, and the Myth of the Surge.

'Modum' by Kai Engel is licensed under CC BY 4.0

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Should Israel negotiate with Hamas and Fatah, or are they unwavering enemies in a protracted struggle? Should Israel negotiate with Hamas and Fatah, or are they unwavering enemies in a protracted struggle? Reason.com yes 1:33:30
Arthur Brooks Wants You To Love Your Enemies: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/arthur-brooks-podcast/ Wed, 27 Mar 2019 21:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/27/arthur-brooks-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/arthur-brooks-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/arthur-brooks-podcast/feed/ 76 The president of the American Enterprise Institute says we need to reboot politics and that libertarians may hold the key. About the only time that love is mentioned in conversations about politics is when a lawmaker gets caught in a sex scandal. Suddenly, the perp starts gushing about how much he loves his spouse, his kids, his constituents, and his country. My guest today on the Reason Podcast wants to change that.

Arthur Brooks' excellent new book is called Love Your Enemies: How Decent People Can Save America From the Culture of Contempt. It's a call to arms for individuals to change how they approach the sorts of increasingly vicious political disagreements that he argues are tearing apart the country. We talk about his decade-long leadership of the American Enterprise Institute, arguably the nation's most-influential conservative think tank, and the places where conservatives and libertarians overlap and continue to disagree. In a wide-ranging conversation, we also discuss his decision to step down as AEI's president and join the faculty of Harvard.

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The president of the American Enterprise Institute says we need to reboot politics and that libertarians may hold the key. The president of the American Enterprise Institute says we need to reboot politics and that libertarians may hold the key. Reason.com yes 50:13
The Mueller Media Hall of Shame: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/mueller-report-media-hall-of-shame/ Mon, 25 Mar 2019 19:45:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/25/mueller-report-media-hall-of-shame/ https://reason.com/podcast/mueller-report-media-hall-of-shame/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/mueller-report-media-hall-of-shame/feed/ 66 Whose hysteria looks silliest in retrospect? Just asking questions! ||| New York magazine
New York magazine

"While this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime," Robert Mueller's long-awaited homework stated, according to Atttorney General William Barr, "it also does not exonerate him." To which Donald Trump has predictably responded: "Total exoneration!"

The president may stand out from the crowd in the amount of power he wields, but he's hardly alone in talking bollocks about the Trump/Russia investigation, as we discuss on today's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast. Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, me, and special guest star Elizabeth Nolan Brown each make their own nominations for the Mueller media Hall of Shame, track how the #Resistance goalposts keep shifting, and ding the president's own (non-criminal) behavior. Along the way, we hear the latest in the non-sex-trafficking case of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, do a little oh-yeah-that about the record-breaking budget deficit, and dissect the C.H.U.D.ian subtexts of Us.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'See You Soon' by Borrtex is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The President Isn't a Russian Spy. Resistance Media Will Keep Freaking Out Anyway," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Mueller's Conclusion: No Coordination Between Trump Campaign and Russia," by Scott Shackford

"As the Mueller Report Drops, a Transparency Fight Begins," by Scott Shackford

"Stop Waiting for the Trump/Russia Smoking Gun," by Matt Welch

"Roger Stone Indictment Describes a Cover-Up of a Nonexistent Crime," by Jacob Sullum

"The Deep State Liars of the #Resistance," by Matt Welch

"Homeland Security and Florida Cops Spied on Chinese Massage Workers for Months but Still Couldn't Find Evidence of Human Trafficking," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"The Truth About the Biggest U.S. Sex Trafficking Story of the Year," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Movie Review: Us," by Kurt Loder

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Whose hysteria looks silliest in retrospect? Whose hysteria looks silliest in retrospect? Reason.com yes 1:02:14
How Capitalism Will Get Us to Mars and Beyond: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/capitalism-mars-technology-thiel/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 17:30:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/22/capitalism-mars-technology-thiel/ https://reason.com/podcast/capitalism-mars-technology-thiel/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/capitalism-mars-technology-thiel/feed/ 41 A conversation with Mike Solana, a vice president at Peter Thiel's venture capital firm Today's Reason Podcast conversation is with Michael Solana, a vice president at the venture capital firm Founders Fund. The firm, which is worth upwards of $3 billion, founded by Peter Thiel, PayPal co-founder Luke Nosek, former PayPal CFO Ken Howery, and Sean Parker of Napster and Facebook fame.

Some of the fund's investments include SpaceX, Airbnb, Lyft, and Oculus, as well as variety of lesser-known companies in the realms of aerospace, biotechnology, energy, and internet technology.

I spoke with Michael about the future, which he thinks about a lot both as an investor in emerging technologies and as host of the official Founders Fund podcast Anatomy of Next, the latest season of which explores the ways technological advancements in rocketry, materials science, augmented reality, fertility science, and artificial intelligence will get humanity to Mars and beyond.

But Solana and his colleagues also believe that Silicon Valley is mired in groupthink and susceptible to the false promises of socialism. In this conversation, we talk about what Founders Fund is doing differently, why Solana believes capitalism is necessarily the engine of growth and innovation, the promise and perils of privatizing government functions, and what he's learned from the famously contrarian Peter Thiel about what it means to be an independent thinker.

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A conversation with Mike Solana, a vice president at Peter Thiel's venture capital firm A conversation with Mike Solana, a vice president at Peter Thiel's venture capital firm Reason.com yes 1:10:51
Lies About Vietnam Inspired Brian Lamb To Start C-SPAN: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/brian-lamb-podcast/ Tue, 19 Mar 2019 17:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/19/brian-lamb-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/brian-lamb-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/brian-lamb-podcast/feed/ 13 Forty years ago, one of the most momentous events in the history of politics and television took place: C-SPAN started<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/brian-lamb-podcast/">...</a> Forty years ago, one of the most momentous events in the history of politics and television took place: C-SPAN started broadcasting live, gavel-to-gavel coverage of the United States House of Representatives.

Long before reality TV shows like Real World, Survivor, Real Housewives, Big Brother, and Sober House, C-SPAN gave Americans direct access to one of the most powerful groups of people on the planet. For the first time in history, we could see our elected representatives debating, wheeling and dealing, freaking out, and occasionally falling asleep while debating government spending, foreign policy, and more.

Over the years, C-SPAN has expanded to include coverage of the Senate; daily public affairs shows featuring policy experts, activists, journalists, and lawmakers; long-form interviews with authors and other influential people; and coverage of events all around the country. In a world in which elite decisionmakers want to shield themselves from all forms of scrutiny and observation, C-SPAN performs the radical intervention of putting a camera on them while also engaging them in thoughtful, frank, and fair conversation.

For today's Reason Podcast, I talked to C-SPAN's founder Brian Lamb, who has managed to shine a bright light on the political process while simultaneously creating a model of civil discourse that is unmatched in cable news. The 77-year-old Indiana native tells me how working in the Pentagon during Vietnam inspired him to push for "openness" in government, why he's still pushing for cameras to cover oral arguments in the Supreme Court, and how C-SPAN expects to weather its next 40 years.

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Photo credit: CHUCK KENNEDY KRT/Newscom

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Forty years ago, one of the most momentous events in the history of politics and television took place: C-SPAN started... Forty years ago, one of the most momentous events in the history of politics and television took place: C-SPAN started... Reason.com yes 40:19
Is There a Libertarian Argument for Breaking up Big Tech?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-3-18-podcast/ Mon, 18 Mar 2019 19:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/18/editors-roundtable-3-18-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-3-18-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-3-18-podcast/feed/ 48 Elizabeth Warren, Donald Trump, Tucker Carlson, and most of the 2020 presidential field agree that tech companies have too power. But maybe they don't like the competition. ||| Preston Ehrler/ZUMA Press/Newscom
Preston Ehrler/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) wants the federal government to forcibly break apart big technology companies. Most of her competitors for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential nomination agree, as do conservative Fox News host Tucker Carlson and (at least occasionally) President Donald Trump. Are they right about the dangerous concentration of private power?

Largely no, argue Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me on the latest Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast. Still, it's worth exploring just why it is people feel disquiet about our technological moment, and what are the best ways to address the associated underlying problems. Also coming under podcast scrutiny: Betomania, the Christchurch mass murderer, J.K. Rowling's auto-fanfic, and the legendary surf-rock guitar king Dick Dale.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Ragtime Dance' by Scott Joplin is licensed under Public Domain

Relevant links from the show:

"Elizabeth Warren Wants to Make Your Life More Annoying and More Expensive," by Peter Suderman

"Elizabeth Warren's Plan to Break Up Big Tech Would Be Bad for America," by David Harsanyi

"Facebook Had Every Right to Reject Elizabeth Warren's Crappy Ad," by Scott Shackford

"Silicon Valley May Rue the Day it Called for Government Intervention Against Microsoft," by Nick Gillespie

"Conservatives Are Wrong to Call for Government 'Trust Busting,'" by Steven Greenhut

"The Shitpost Terrorist," by Jesse Walker

"Has Phony Betomania Already Bitten the Dust?" by Matt Welch

"35 Heroes of Freedom," by the Reason staff

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Elizabeth Warren, Donald Trump, Tucker Carlson, and most of the 2020 presidential field agree that tech companies have too power. But maybe they don't like the competition. Elizabeth Warren, Donald Trump, Tucker Carlson, and most of the 2020 presidential field agree that tech companies have too power. But maybe they don't like the competition. Reason.com yes 58:36
A Tattooed Libertarian on the Arizona Supreme Court: Clint Bolick's Long Fight for Freedom https://reason.com/podcast/cliint-bolick/ Fri, 15 Mar 2019 16:10:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/15/cliint-bolick/ https://reason.com/podcast/cliint-bolick/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/cliint-bolick/feed/ 21 Q&A with the co-founder of Institute for Justice about immigration, his legal philosophy, his battles with Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and <em>that</em> tattoo. In 2016, Clint Bolick became an associate justice on the Arizona State Supreme Court, making him one of the most influential—and consequential—libertarians in today's legal world.

That appointment is merely the most recent career highlight for the 61-year-old activist, author, and policy wonk. Bolick worked under Clarence Thomas at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in the 1980s before moving to the Justice Department. While he was there he published his first book, which argued that the civil rights movement should focus on removing government barriers to economic opportunity.

In 1991, Bolick and Chip Mellor founded the Institute for Justice, the country's premier libertarian public-interest law firm. In 2007, he became vice president for litigation at the Goldwater Institute, Arizona's leading free-market think tank, where he took on restrictive licensing, zoning, and business regulations—and became a nemesis to Joe Arpaio, the self-proclaimed "toughest sheriff" America.

Reason's Nick Gillespie sat down with Bolick in Phoenix to talk about his legal philosophy, the politics of immigration, the most interesting case he's encountered on the bench so far, and why he sports a scorpion tattoo on what he calls his "typing finger."

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Photo credits:Gage Skidmore, Steven Depolo, and Gary Moon/ZUMA Press/Newscom

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Q&A with the co-founder of Institute for Justice about immigration, his legal philosophy, his battles with Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and that tattoo. Q&A with the co-founder of Institute for Justice about immigration, his legal philosophy, his battles with Sheriff Joe Arpaio, and that tattoo. Reason.com yes 19:55
Elizabeth Warren Wants To Run Your Business for You: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/zywicki-podcast/ Wed, 13 Mar 2019 18:15:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/13/zywicki-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/zywicki-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/zywicki-podcast/feed/ 32 George Mason's Todd Zywicki says the senator and presidential hopeful has inherited the ideas of Louis Brandeis without learning the lessons of overregulation. "I am a capitalist," says Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who is also a leading contender for the 2020 Democratic Party presidential nomination. "I believe in markets."

She's got a funny way of showing her faith. Last week, she unveiled her plan to break up tech giants such as Facebook, Amazon, Google, and Apple. She's called for a "wealth tax" that would target households with over $50 million in assets and introduced the Accountable Capitalism Act, which would force corporations with over $1 billion in annual revenue to get a national charter and give employees the right to vote in 40 percent of a company's board of directors. She was also the driving force behind the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, an Obama-era agency that was widely assailed by free-market analysts as overly intrusive and unaccountable.

To get a sense of where Warren's ideas come from, I talked with Todd Zywicki, a longtime critic of Warren. Zywicki teaches law at George Mason University and is the former director of the Office of Policy Planning at the Federal Trade Commission. Zywicki says Warren is a direct ideological descendant of Louis Brandeis, the Progressive Era lawyer and Supreme Court justice who attacked what he called "the curse of bigness" in business and pushed for a massively regulated economy. Warren, says Zywicki, has thoroughly absorbed Brandeis's distrust of large firms, as well as his belief that "disinterested" bureaucrats can smooth out any and all issues with free markets. What she doesn't understand, he says, is that the regulatory agencies championed by Brandeis were routinely captured by the businesses they regulated or diverted by the idiosyncratic whims of commissioners, leading to the increasing ossification of the U.S. economy through much of the 20th century until deregulation took hold first during the Carter years and later under Ronald Reagan. More recently, notes Zywicki, the Dodd-Frank laws passed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis to limit the power of banks have actually increased concentration in the financial sector.

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George Mason's Todd Zywicki says the senator and presidential hopeful has inherited the ideas of Louis Brandeis without learning the lessons of overregulation. George Mason's Todd Zywicki says the senator and presidential hopeful has inherited the ideas of Louis Brandeis without learning the lessons of overregulation. Reason.com yes 46:13
The Socialists Are Coming! Or Are They?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/the-socialists-are-coming/ Mon, 11 Mar 2019 21:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/03/11/the-socialists-are-coming/ https://reason.com/podcast/the-socialists-are-coming/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/the-socialists-are-coming/feed/ 31 Democratic mega-proposals, GOP budgetary fictions, prostitution decriminalization surprises, and <em>Zardoz</em> moments galore The new Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast (featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me), starts off, as so much policy discussion does nowadays, with a quote from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.). From there we get into polling data about the youths and their socialisms, concrete mega-proposals from 2020 presidential candidates, and garbage tweets like this:

Also broached during this podcast: President Donald Trump's practically fictional budget request, the surprising emergence of decriminalized prostitution as at least a side issue in the 2020 Democratic primary, Captain Marvel's too-obvious '90s references (as if such a thing were possible), and Nick Gillespie's eternal Zardoz moments.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'IMF' by DOt is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 30

Relevant links from the show:

"Large Majority of Millennials and Gen Z Support Private Health Insurance While Nearly Half Say They Want Socialism," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Why Are We Still Debating the 'Merits' of Socialism?" by Steven Greenhut

"The Rise of the Low-Tax Socialists," by Peter Suderman

"'Everyone' Here Is a Socialist Except Most Americans," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"White House Budget Calls for Domestic Spending Cuts, Military Spending Hikes, $8 Billion for Border Wall, Extension of Tax Cuts," by Eric Boehm

"Kamala Harris Won't Denounce Federal Law That Harms Sex Workers, but May Support Decriminalizing Prostitution," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Captain Marvel Is a Message Movie Without a Message," by Peter Suderman

And, of course, reason.com/search?q=Zardoz.

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Democratic mega-proposals, GOP budgetary fictions, prostitution decriminalization surprises, and Zardoz moments galore Democratic mega-proposals, GOP budgetary fictions, prostitution decriminalization surprises, and Zardoz moments galore Reason.com yes 1:06:42
23-Year-Old Coleman Hughes Is Reframing the Discussion on Race: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/coleman-hughes-podcast/ Fri, 08 Mar 2019 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/03/08/coleman-hughes-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/coleman-hughes-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/coleman-hughes-podcast/feed/ 44 Meet the undergrad who is recovering the legacy of gay, socialist civil-rights activist Bayard Rustin while explicating Kanye West's conservatism. In today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Coleman Hughes, a 23-year-old junior at Columbia University who has emerged over the past year as one of the most prolific and insightful commentators on race and class in the United States.

He's analyzed the relatively forgotten legacy of the gay, socialist, anti–affirmative action civil-rights activist Bayard Rustin for The New York Times, discussed the "colorblind legacy" of Martin Luther King, Jr., in The Wall Street Journal, and published a growing list of articles on everything from Kanye West's conservatism to the racial wealth gap at the heterodox website Quillette.

We talk about his childhood in New Jersey, the climate for free speech on today's campuses, playing trombone in a Charles Mingus tribute band that plays Mondays in New York, and more.

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Meet the undergrad who is recovering the legacy of gay, socialist civil-rights activist Bayard Rustin while explicating Kanye West's conservatism. Meet the undergrad who is recovering the legacy of gay, socialist civil-rights activist Bayard Rustin while explicating Kanye West's conservatism. Reason.com yes 52:49
Peter Bagge on Underground Comics, Immigration, and Being a Libertarian Artist: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/peter-bagge-podcast/ Wed, 06 Mar 2019 19:10:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/03/06/peter-bagge-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/peter-bagge-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/peter-bagge-podcast/feed/ 14 The cartoonist talks about being libertarian, why Marvel is OK with "serums" but not drugs, and how comic books have evolved over the past 30 years. In the new issue of Reason (subscribe now for as little at $14.97 a year!), legendary comics artist Peter Bagge contributes "Immigration Grunts," a four-page cartoon essay about people trying to help refugees and asylum-seekers stuck in a federal immigration facility in Tacoma, Washington.

Bagge's career started in the 1970s and he is probably best-known as the creator of Hate, an underground comic that helped to define alternative culture in the 1990s. He has been drawing for Reason for almost 20 years (his Reason archive is online here and his 2013 collection of Reason work, Everybody Is Stupid Except for Me, is available at Amazon).

On today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Bagge about his new Reason essay, how he chooses topics to draw, and what it's like to be working in a medium that was once considered unserious but is now heralded as a legitimate art form. We also talk about his forthcoming graphic novel, Credo: The Rose Wilder Lane Story, which tells the life story of one of the founding figures of the modern libertarian movement who also helped craft her mother's stories about her frontier childhood into the beloved Little House on the Prairie books.

Bagge dishes on how his libertarian politics often put him at odds with his fellow cartoonists and reminsces about his apprenticeship to Robert Crumb, arguably the most-important underground-comics artist of them all. Crumb was a "wonderful mentor," says Bagge, who notes that the two don't agree on politics. "I once asked him, 'Bob, what are your politics?" says Bagge with a laugh, "and he said 'I believe in a communist dictatorship with me as the dictator.'" He also tells a fantastic story about how the higher-ups at Marvel balked at a Hulk comic he drew in which the title character took drugs until he called the substances serums instead.

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The cartoonist talks about being libertarian, why Marvel is OK with "serums" but not drugs, and how comic books have evolved over the past 30 years. The cartoonist talks about being libertarian, why Marvel is OK with "serums" but not drugs, and how comic books have evolved over the past 30 years. Reason.com yes 57:37
Strange New Respect for…Nancy Pelosi?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/strange-new-respect-for-nancy-pelosi/ Mon, 04 Mar 2019 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/03/04/strange-new-respect-for-nancy-pelosi/ https://reason.com/podcast/strange-new-respect-for-nancy-pelosi/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/strange-new-respect-for-nancy-pelosi/feed/ 54 We live in desperate times when the brake on both Democratic socialism and Republican executive-branch abuse is a 78-year-old San Francisco Democrat. ||| JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS/Newscom
JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS/Newscom

Who does the best insult comedy about the Green New Deal? Well, President Donald Trump, of course, but let's not leave out of the conversation Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D–Calif.), who famously referred to it as "the green dream or whatever they call it."

Pelosi gets some surprising shout-outs on the new Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast (featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me), over her stiff-arming progressive fantasia and opposition to the president's emergency declaration, in which she was joined by a lonely libertarian-leaning congressman and senator. The gang also has a good long talk over the contemporary political meaning of "socialism," the ideological content (such as it existed) of the Conservative Political Action Conference, and why you should stop what you're doing and check out this great new Claypool Lennon Delirium video about weirder-than-life rocketeer/cultist Jack Parsons.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Keymonica' by Pietnastka is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Just Might Have Won the 2020 Election Today," by Nick Gillespie

"At CPAC, the Culture War Matters More than Politics or Policy," by Nick Gillespie

"'Everyone' Here Is a Socialist Except Most Americans," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Top Pelosi Aide Tells Insurance Industry Medicare for All Would Be Costly, Politically Perilous, and Difficult To Implement," by Peter Suderman

"Rand Paul Will Vote to Block Trump's Emergency Declaration," by Eric Boehm

"Rep. Justin Amash: 'The President Doesn't Get To Just Declare an Emergency,'" by Joe Setyon

"House Votes to Terminate Trump's National Emergency," by Christian Britschgi

"Kamala Harris Wants to Revive the ERA," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Rather Than Running for President, Maybe Joe Biden Should Just Launch an Apology Tour," by Scott Shackford

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We live in desperate times when the brake on both Democratic socialism and Republican executive-branch abuse is a 78-year-old San Francisco Democrat. We live in desperate times when the brake on both Democratic socialism and Republican executive-branch abuse is a 78-year-old San Francisco Democrat. Reason.com yes 1:02:37
Why Parents Shouldn't Flip Out Over Too Much Screen Time: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/jordan-shapiro-podcast/ Fri, 01 Mar 2019 18:45:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/03/01/jordan-shapiro-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/jordan-shapiro-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/jordan-shapiro-podcast/feed/ 5 Jordan Shapiro's <em>The New Childhood</em> boldly embraces technological innovation and the interconnected world it's creating. "How do I prepare my children for a future I can't imagine?"

Adults project their fears onto children—our own or other people's—and especially tend to view new technologies (the internet) and cultural products (video games) as mortal threats to the way things have always been and should always be. That leads to a lot of really bad policies and ridiculous urban legends (Momo Challenge, anyone?). And constantly being in a state of panic over change makes life pretty sucky for kids and grown-ups alike.

My guest today is Jordan Shapiro, author of The New Childhood: Raising Kids To Thrive in a Connected World. Unlike virtually any other book about kids and digital culture that I have read in recent years, The New Childhood doesn't begin from the presumption that smartphones, tablets, and online gaming are making kids dumber, less focused, and unhappy. Shapiro, a psychologist who teaches at Temple University, has produced a thoughtful analysis of the benefits of new media for younger people. As important, he shows how adults need to understand the uniquely interconnected world in which their children now live. This deeply researched, historically conscious, and powerfully argued book blends academic rigor with personal experience and practical advice. In it, Shapiro takes free-range parenting into the cloud.

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Jordan Shapiro's The New Childhood boldly embraces technological innovation and the interconnected world it's creating. Jordan Shapiro's The New Childhood boldly embraces technological innovation and the interconnected world it's creating. Reason.com yes 38:46
What Caused the 2008 Financial Crisis: Market Distortions or Market Failure? A Debate https://reason.com/podcast/what-caused-the-2008-financial-crisis/ Wed, 27 Feb 2019 17:30:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2019/02/27/what-caused-the-2008-financial-crisis/ https://reason.com/podcast/what-caused-the-2008-financial-crisis/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/what-caused-the-2008-financial-crisis/feed/ 73 Former BB&T Bank CEO John Allison vs. Moody's Mark Zandi Was the 2008 financial crisis caused by market distortions or market failure?

That was the topic of a public debated hosted by the Soho Forum in New York City on February 20, 2019. It featured John Allison, former CEO of BB&T Bank and former CEO and president of the Cato Institute, and Mark Zandi, the chief economist of Moody's Analytics. Allison argued that market distortions led to the financial crisis, and Zandi attributed the crisis to market failure. Soho Forum Director Gene Epstein moderated.

It was an Oxford-style debate, in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious. Allison prevailed by convincing about 10 percent of audience members to change their minds.

Today Allison is an executive in residence at the Wake Forest School of Business. He's author of The Financial Crisis and the Free Market Cure: Why Pure Capitalism is the World Economy's Only Hope (McGraw-Hill, 2012). Zandi is the author of Financial Shock: A 360º Look at the Subprime Mortgage Implosion, and How to Avoid the Next Financial Crisis.

The Soho Forum, which is sponsored by the Reason Foundation, is a monthly debate series at the SubCulture Theater in Manhattan's East Village.

Music: "Modum" by Kai Engle is licensed under a CC-BY creative commons license.

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Former BB&T Bank CEO John Allison vs. Moody's Mark Zandi Former BB&T Bank CEO John Allison vs. Moody's Mark Zandi Reason.com yes 1:18:06
Is Hollywood Overthinking Representation?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/is-hollywood-over-thinking-representatio/ Mon, 25 Feb 2019 21:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/25/is-hollywood-over-thinking-representatio/ https://reason.com/podcast/is-hollywood-over-thinking-representatio/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/is-hollywood-over-thinking-representatio/feed/ 102 The perils—and profits—of being identity-focused in business, content, and audience #OscarsSoGreen ||| Dave Bedrosian/ZUMA Press/Newscom
Dave Bedrosian/ZUMA Press/Newscom

On last week's Editors' Roundtable episode of the Reason Podcast, guest star Stephanie Slade argued near the end that the racial-reconciliation movie Green Book feels a bit out of step with where America's cultural conversation has moved these past few years. Boy howdy, judging by the torrential response to the movie's Best Picture victory at last night's Academy Awards. So let's pick a fresh scab, courtesy of returning Editor in Chief Katherine Mangu-Ward, who wrote a provocative piece in this weekend's New York Times under the headline, "Stop Counting Women: Quotas and tallies won't bring real progress on gender parity."

Mangu-Ward and the rest of the gang (Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, me) have an extended conversation on representation, audience-growing, opinion journalism, the malleability of Spider-Man, and related controversies, including (natch) some of the greatest libertarian movies in history. Also coming under discussion are Venezuelan war-mongering, mixed metaphors, and the expansion of "Selective" Service registration to include lady-folk.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Songe D'Automne' by Latche Swing is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Kurt Loder Wants Lady Gaga to Win an Oscar," by Nick Gillespie

"Are 'Inclusion Riders' a Libertarian Solution to Workplace Inequality or P.C. Run Amok?" by Nick Gillespie

"The Case for Gender Anarchy," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"What Do 'Women in Liberty' Want?" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"The Time for an All-Male Military Draft 'Has Passed,' Says Federal Judge," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Federal Court Rules Male-Only Draft Registration is Unconstitutional," by Ilya Somin

"Rand Paul to Introduce Muhammad Ali Bill to End Selective Service," by Ed Krayweski

"End, Don't Extend, the Draft," by Sheldon Richman

"Should Women Be Required to Sign Up for the Military Draft?" by Ronald Bailey

"Marco Rubio's Veiled Call for Military Intervention in Venezuela Is a Bad Idea," by Nick Gillespie

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The perils—and profits—of being identity-focused in business, content, and audience The perils—and profits—of being identity-focused in business, content, and audience Reason.com yes 1:06:24
Kurt Loder Wants Lady Gaga to Win an Oscar: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/kurt-loder-podcast/ Fri, 22 Feb 2019 21:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/22/kurt-loder-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/kurt-loder-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/kurt-loder-podcast/feed/ 31 <em>Reason</em>'s movie reviewer handicaps the Academy Awards and explains why this is the best and worst time to be a consumer of popular culture. The Academy Awards take place on Sunday, so for today's Reason Podcast I was excited to talk with Reason's movie reviewer, Kurt Loder, about this year's nominees. (Read his Reason archive here.)

Loder is a cultural omnivore who started out writing for rock magazines in the 1970s, ending up at Rolling Stone. He co-authored Tina Turner's best-selling memoir (the basis for the movie What's Love Got To Do With It?) before moving on MTV, where he served as news anchor. Outside of Reason, the best place to find Loder these days is SiriusXM, where he hosts True Stories, a weekly interview show featuring famous rock musicians telling tales out of school, and Twitter, where he comments on a wide variety of topics.

Today, we talked about the films, directors, and actors he thinks are most deserving. (He's especially high on Lady Gaga's performance in A Star Is Born, which he also thinks should win Best Picture.) We also discussed whether it's time for big, bloated, self-congratulatory awards shows such as the Oscars to sink into the ocean like good old Mr. Norman Main, whether we're in a golden age of popular culture (yes, but…), and what music and novels are capturing Loder's attention these days.

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Reason's movie reviewer handicaps the Academy Awards and explains why this is the best and worst time to be a consumer of popular culture. Reason's movie reviewer handicaps the Academy Awards and explains why this is the best and worst time to be a consumer of popular culture. Reason.com yes 34:44
Let's Talk About Sex Differences with Christina Hoff Sommers and Debra Soh: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/sommers-and-soh-podcast/ Wed, 20 Feb 2019 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/20/sommers-and-soh-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/sommers-and-soh-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/sommers-and-soh-podcast/feed/ 53 Frank talk about evolution, feminism, politics, and why we don't want to acknowledge social progress. Few topics inspire more anxiety, anger, and confusion than sex differences between men and women. If you believe in evolution, you believe that sex differences between men and women are real and persistent. If you believe in libertarian values of individualism and freedom, you want everyone to be treated equally under the law, in the workplace, and in social settings.

On today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Christina Hoff Sommers and Debra Soh about our constantly evolving understanding of gender roles, how biology and culture shape our expectations, the successes and excesses of contemporary feminism, what today's sexism looks like, and how best to measure progress. Both were in New York to speak at a panel titled "Who's Afraid of Sex Differences?" organized by the Independent Women's Forum.

Sommers is a resident scholar at Washington, D.C.'s American Enterprise Institute, the author of such well-known books as Who Stole Feminism and The War Against Boys, and co-host (with Danielle Crittenden) of the Femsplainers podcast. Soh is a Toronto-based psychologist who writes frequently on gender and science issues for The Globe and Mail and Playboy, and co-hosts (with Jonathan Kay) a podcast called Wrongspeak for the website Quillette.

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Frank talk about evolution, feminism, politics, and why we don't want to acknowledge social progress. Frank talk about evolution, feminism, politics, and why we don't want to acknowledge social progress. Reason.com yes 54:06
Are Libertarians Feeling the Bern?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/are-libertarians-feeling-the-bern/ Tue, 19 Feb 2019 20:35:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/19/are-libertarians-feeling-the-bern/ https://reason.com/podcast/are-libertarians-feeling-the-bern/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/are-libertarians-feeling-the-bern/feed/ 64 How an independent helped shape the Democratic policy agenda. ||| NBC News
NBC News

Who's ready for a little political revolution? Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) announced this morning that he's running for president again, and already he's raised more than a million dollars from his non-oligarch fans. An extended analysis of the barky democratic socialist—his policy agenda-setting, his polling, his crowded lane—kicks off this week's Editors' Roundtable version of the Reason Podcast, featuring Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, Peter Suderman, and special guest star Stephanie Slade.

Also coming under discussion: President Donald Trump's emergency declaration and stroke-inducing press conference, Amazon's New York pull-out, and whether America will ever again be in the mood for feel-good racial reconciliation movies featuring white protagonists.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"Bernie Sanders Wants to 'Complete That Revolution," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Bernie Sanders Wants To Seize 77% of Dead Billionaires' Estates," by Joe Setyon

"Kamala Harris Just Showed Why Bernie Sanders' Medicare for All Plan Won't Work," by Peter Suderman

"Bernie's Bad Ideas," by Matt Welch

"Klobuchar Breaks With Progressives on Free College, Green New Deal," by Eric Boehm

"Trump's Emergency Action on the Border Wall Stinks All the Way Down," by Nick Gillespie

"Trump Says He 'Didn't Need to' Declare a National Emergency to Build His Border Wall," by Joe Setyon

"Once a Critic of Executive Power, Trump Is Now Taking Us Closer to Rule by Decree," by J.D. Tuccille

"Amazon Kills NYC Headquarters Plans After Opposition From Local Pols," by Christian Britschgi

"It's Good for Everyone that the Amazon-New York Deal Fell Through," by Nick Gillespie

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How an independent helped shape the Democratic policy agenda. How an independent helped shape the Democratic policy agenda. Reason.com yes 1:06:33
Report from 'Alienated America': Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/tim-carney-alienated-america-podcast/ Fri, 15 Feb 2019 20:45:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/15/tim-carney-alienated-america-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/tim-carney-alienated-america-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/tim-carney-alienated-america-podcast/feed/ 36 For his new book, Timothy Carney toured parts of the country that are working and parts that are not. What he found is deeply disturbing. "The American Dream is dead," declared Donald Trump in 2015 when he announced he was running for president. "If I get elected president, I will bring it back bigger and better than ever before."

One of the most interesting outcomes of the 2016 election is that about 10 percent of people who voted for Barack Obama ended up voting for Trump. Such switch voters, many of whom lived in rural parts of contested states in the Midwest, helped him eke out a victory. They voted for Obama in 2008 because they wanted change they could believe in. In 2016, they were still looking for change, this time from a New York billionaire.

In his new book Alienated America: Why Some Places Thrive While Others Collapse, Timothy P. Carney does a deep dive on many of the places that voted first for Obama and then for Trump. It's a powerful, provocative, and deeply reported look at a contemporary political and social landscape in which much of the traditional social fabric of marriage, family, and work has been worn away and replaced by distant, "overcentralized" bureaucrats and businesses.

For today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Carney, commentary editor for the Washington Examiner, about the causes of social breakdown, the policies that can help struggling people, and the limits of any president's power to revive the American dream.

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For his new book, Timothy Carney toured parts of the country that are working and parts that are not. What he found is deeply disturbing. For his new book, Timothy Carney toured parts of the country that are working and parts that are not. What he found is deeply disturbing. Reason.com yes 57:39
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Green New Deal: A Bizarre Grab-Bag of Terrible Ideas https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-deal-wont-work/ Thu, 14 Feb 2019 14:54:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/14/green-new-deal-wont-work/ https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-deal-wont-work/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-deal-wont-work/feed/ 93 Q&A with economist Veronique de Rugy. Last week, New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Democratic Senator Edward Markey introduced the Green New Deal, a non-binding resolution that would radically overhaul America's economy in the name of fighting global climate change. The resolution bundled together a variety of big-ticket progressive policy priorities, not all of which were obviously related to climate change, from universal health coverage to a jobs guarantee to subsidized college.

The proposal was swiftly praised by much of the 2020 Democratic presidential field—yet even some liberals wondered if it was trying to do too much at once. In attempting to be all things to everyone, would the Green New Deal end up being nothing to anyone?

Veronique de Rugy, a Reason columnist and a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, joins us to explain what the Green New Deal means, why it would be so expensive, and why even socialist countries in Europe don't try to do this much.

Interview by Peter Suderman. Edited by Meredith Bragg, Todd Krainin, and Mark McDaniel. Cameras by Bragg and Krainin.

FRACTURES by Ryan Little.

Photo Credits:

STEVE FERDMAN/UPI/Newscom

JONATHAN ERNST/REUTERS/Newscom

Estelle Ruiz/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Alex Edelman/SIPA/Newscom

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Q&A with economist Veronique de Rugy. Q&A with economist Veronique de Rugy. Reason.com yes 10:17
Donald Trump and Social Justice Warriors Are 'Unmaking America': Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/noah-rothman-on-unjust-social-justice-an/ Wed, 13 Feb 2019 20:20:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/13/noah-rothman-on-unjust-social-justice-an/ https://reason.com/podcast/noah-rothman-on-unjust-social-justice-an/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/noah-rothman-on-unjust-social-justice-an/feed/ 75 Noah Rothman says the right and the left are using appeals to victimization and identity politics to gain political power. "The American tradition of political idealism," writes Noah Rothman in his new book Unjust: Social Justice and the Unmaking of America, "is imperiled by a growing obsession with the demographic categories of race, sex, ethnicity, and sexual orientation—the primary categories that are now supposed to constitute 'identity.'"

While phrases such as social justice and identity politics are usually identified with the progressive left, Rothman, an associate editor at Commentary and a contributor to MSNBC, argues provocatively that the rise of Donald Trump shows "victimization has bipartisan appeal."

In today's Reason Podcast, I talk with the 37-year-old journalist about the roots of identity politics, the rise of street violence among alt-right and antifa types, and how we might restore belief in an inclusive, forward-looking America built around common ideals rather than bitter enmity.

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Noah Rothman says the right and the left are using appeals to victimization and identity politics to gain political power. Noah Rothman says the right and the left are using appeals to victimization and identity politics to gain political power. Reason.com yes 1:13:33
Green New WTF?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-wtf/ Mon, 11 Feb 2019 21:55:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/11/green-new-wtf/ https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-wtf/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/green-new-wtf/feed/ 70 Untethered from real-world constraints, progressive Democratic policy goes utopian. Oh, Van. ||| Disney
Disney

Is it kind of missing the point to talk about what Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's (D–N.Y.) Green New Deal (GND) actually contains? That's the meta-question lurking just under the surface of the new Editors' Roundtable version of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, and Peter Suderman.

The Reason editors talk about the GND's contents, its role in Democratic Party ideological positioning, and how it reflects an increasingly utopian, fact-untethered age of political discourse. Along the way, they also assess recent exertions by possible 2020 presidential candidates Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D–Minn.), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.), Sen. Kamala Harris (D–Calif.), Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D–Texas), and former Libertarian Party vice presidential candidate Bill Weld. You can listen to the whole thing here:

Audio production by Mark McDaniel.

Drop of Water In the Ocean by Broke For Free is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

Relevant links from the show:

"Green New Deal—Same Old Progressive Policies," by Ronald Bailey

"How Much Will the Green New Deal Cost?," by Ronald Bailey

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's Green New Deal Aims to Eliminate Air Travel," by Joe Setyon

"Zoning Makes the Green New Deal Impossible," by Christian Britschgi

"Think the Green New Deal Is Crazy? Blame Intersectionality." By Robby Soave

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Calls Climate Change 'Our World War II,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Green New Deal Will Try Anything Except Nukes, Hydro, Markets…," by Ronald Bailey

"Kamala Harris Says Her Opposition to Marijuana Legalization Is 'Not True.' We Have the Receipts!" by Scott Shackford

"Kamala Harris Hopes You'll Forget Her Record as a Drug Warrior and Draconian Prosecutor," by Justin Monticello & Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Scandal-Plagued Sen. Amy Klobuchar Announces 2020 Presidential Run," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Bill Weld So Far Getting Chilly Northeast Reception to Possible GOP Primary Bid," by Matt Welch

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Untethered from real-world constraints, progressive Democratic policy goes utopian. Untethered from real-world constraints, progressive Democratic policy goes utopian. Reason.com yes 57:10
Sex-Trafficking Hysteria Is Eroding Privacy in Hotels, Airplanes, and More: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/enb-talks-sex-work-and-marriott-policy-p/ Fri, 08 Feb 2019 18:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/08/enb-talks-sex-work-and-marriott-policy-p/ https://reason.com/podcast/enb-talks-sex-work-and-marriott-policy-p/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/enb-talks-sex-work-and-marriott-policy-p/feed/ 32 Elizabeth Nolan Brown talks about DHS's "Blue Campaign," which is pushing hotel and airline workers to call the feds if they suspect human trafficking.
Kevin Lamarque/REUTERS/Newscom

In her blockbuster exposé "Are You a Woman Traveling Alone?," Reason's Elizabeth Nolan Brown does a deep dive on the Department of Homeland Security "Blue Campaign." This campaign pushes the hospitality industry, air travel companies, and other businesses to call the feds if they suspect customers are involved in "trafficking"—an increasingly loose term that covers everything from slavery to traditional prostitution. The Marriott hotel chain, for instance, recently tweeted that all of its 750,000 employees worldwide are "being trained to help spot sex trafficking in our hotels."

For today's Reason Podcast, I talked with Brown about her story. More often than not, she writes, crackdowns on trafficking translate into rousting women sitting alone in bars and other common areas, snooping on fathers traveling with teenage daughters, or calling federally funded tip lines on guests who have "too many" condoms. In several recent high-profile cases involving airlines, "staff trained to 'spot traffickers' have harassed interracial couples and families. When people are asked to use gut instinct to stop real but rare horrors, relying on racial stereotypes and other biases tends to rule." Brown also documents the role of Polaris Project and ECPAT-USA, nonprofits that operate tip lines and provide training on spotting trafficking, in promoting these fears.

Whatever the intentions behind the Blue Campaign, and despite Donald Trump's promise in his State of the Union address to crack down on traffickers smuggling women across "wide-open areas" on the U.S.-Mexico border, there is no evidence that sexual slavery is on the rise in the United States. The result, Brown argues, is that consensual sex work is being redefined as trafficking and the privacy of all Americans is taking another hit.

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Elizabeth Nolan Brown talks about DHS's "Blue Campaign," which is pushing hotel and airline workers to call the feds if they suspect human trafficking. Elizabeth Nolan Brown talks about DHS's "Blue Campaign," which is pushing hotel and airline workers to call the feds if they suspect human trafficking. Reason.com yes 37:53
Don't Fear Independents Like Howard Schultz! Politics Should Be More Like a Starbucks Menu https://reason.com/podcast/dont-be-afraid-of-independent-candidates/ Thu, 07 Feb 2019 19:56:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/07/dont-be-afraid-of-independent-candidates/ https://reason.com/podcast/dont-be-afraid-of-independent-candidates/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/dont-be-afraid-of-independent-candidates/feed/ 61 There are more forms of hepatitis than there are major parties in America. Nearly a dozen Democrats are already running for president. The highlights so far include an interview about immigration livestreamed from a dental chair, a former Harvard professor popping a beer like jes' plain folks on New Year's Eve, and a draconian former prosecutor pledging her allegiance to Wakanda. Democrats are tripping over each other to pitch Medicare for All, Free College for All, Guaranteed Jobs for All, and laying taxes on wealth as well as income.

And then there's Howard Schultz.

The former CEO of Starbucks is considering a run for president as a "centrist independent." He says that the national debt threatens economic growth, that we shouldn't demonize successful entrepreneurs, and that the government can't be all things to all people.

That brought public hate, contempt, and character assassination from every conceivable angle.

It's not just anti-globalist lefties on the attack. The New York Times' op-ed page says he's narcissistic, delusional, and fanatical. His potential run, his critics claim, would be nothing short of "reckless idiocy."

But Schultz's belief that neither major party represents America is widely shared. A plurality of Americans don't identify with either party. And nearly three-quarters of us think the country is headed in the wrong direction, which helps to explain why neither Hillary Clinton nor Donald Trump won a majority of the popular vote in 2016.

The two-party duopoly and its supporters in the media understand how widely disliked they are, which is why they want to kneecap anyone who isn't on Team Red or Team Blue.

You don't have to agree with Schultz to understand that having more voices and ideas on the table at this point in the election cycle is a good thing—especially when you consider the alternatives.

Democrats fear people such as Schultz because they think he will drain votes from whoever their nominee ends up being, giving Trump a path to re-election. But that's actually a faulty analysis.

Former Republican Rep. John Anderson was blamed for pulling votes from Jimmy Carter in 1980, but almost half his supporters would have gone with Reagan as their second choice.

In 1992, the GOP fingered Ross Perot as a political saboteur, but the 19 percent of Americans who pulled the lever for the Texas Billionaire were equally split between Bush and Clinton as their fallback. In 2016, socially liberal and fiscally conservative voters—Schultz's demographic—broke for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton, suggesting the coffee-shop magnate would pull votes from the incumbent president rather than his Democratic challenger.

Four years ago, during his attempt to win the Democratic nomination, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I–Vt.) complained that we don't "need a choice of 23 underarm spray deodorants." If variety in armpit aroma isn't his thing, I'd like to believe that the Vermont socialist would at least favor more choice at the ballot box. Right now, there are more forms of hepatitis than viable political parties in America.

So it's kind of fitting that the former CEO of a company that introduced infinite choice in coffee drinks is now being dragged for threatening to expand the political spectrum all the way from A to C. If American politics can't stand even the possibility of an independent candidate who praises capitalism, opposes massive tax increases, and wants to reduce federal debt, we're already screwed.

Edited by Mark McDaniel. Cameras by Jim Epstein. Graphics by Joshua Swain.

"Ghost Dance" by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

Photo Credits: David Becker/ZUMA Press/Newscom; Brian Cahn/ZUMA Press/Newscom; Brian Cahn/TNS/Newscom. Rick Friedman/Polaris/Newscom; Imagine China/Newscom; Everett Collection/Newscom; Arnie Sachs/SIPA/Newscom; Mark Reinstein/ZUMA Press/Newscom; JASON REDMOND/REUTERS/Newscom

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There are more forms of hepatitis than there are major parties in America. There are more forms of hepatitis than there are major parties in America. Reason.com yes
The State of the Union Is Rockets, Socialism, Alliteration, and Nazis: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/well-that-was-the-state-of-the-union-pod/ Wed, 06 Feb 2019 05:04:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/06/well-that-was-the-state-of-the-union-pod/ https://reason.com/podcast/well-that-was-the-state-of-the-union-pod/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/well-that-was-the-state-of-the-union-pod/feed/ 27 "The agenda I will lay out this evening is not a Republican Agenda or a Democrat Agenda. It is the agenda of the American People." Immediately after President Donald Trump stepped down from the dias at his State of the Union address on Tuesday night, Reason editors Katherine Mangu-Ward and Peter Suderman grabbed their podcasting mics to talk rockets, socialism, American greatness, alliteration, uteruses, and Nazis.

We give props to some high points in the speech ("Great nations do not fight endless wars.") We note some encouraging hints about Trump's possible legacy as a criminal justice reformer ("Alice's story underscores the disparities and unfairness that can exist in criminal sentencing—and the need to remedy this injustice.") We also ponder the possibility of a massive new entitlement ("I am also proud to be the first president to include in my budget a plan for nationwide paid family leave—so that every new parent has the chance to bond with their newborn child.") And we ultimately fret about a vision of national greatness that relies on illegal immigrants and nations who want to sell us cheap stuff as the enemies that will bind us together.

Body Language by Asthmatic Astronaut is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

Audio production by Mark McDaniel

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"The agenda I will lay out this evening is not a Republican Agenda or a Democrat Agenda. It is the agenda of the American People." "The agenda I will lay out this evening is not a Republican Agenda or a Democrat Agenda. It is the agenda of the American People." Reason.com yes 23:54
What Fresh Horror Will the State of the Union Address Bring?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-2-4-podcast/ Mon, 04 Feb 2019 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/04/editors-roundtable-2-4-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-2-4-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/editors-roundtable-2-4-podcast/feed/ 91 What comes next in the Virginia governor scandal, why "Medicare for All" ain't happening, and how Baby Boomers are a fatberg clogging America's cultural sewers This past weekend gave witness to one of the most unimaginable political scandals of the 21st century, as yearbook photos from 1984 of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam in either blackface or a KKK costume surfaced. Northam, 60, first apologized for the pictures and then denied he was in them. But he acknowledged that he had used blackface during a Michael Jackson dance competition in his twenties, and he seemed like he might be about to demonstrate his moves at a press conference until his wife told him not to. According to Big League Politics, the site that published the photo, a medical school classmate leaked it because of Northam's support for a bill that would have lessened restrictions on late-term abortions.

On today's Reason Podcast, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Matt Welch, and Nick Gillespie discuss whether Northam will survive and the changing politics of race. We also talk about Sen. Cory Booker (D–N.J.), the latest Democrat to announce a presidential bid, and his shift away from school choice, which he supported heavily as mayor of Newark; why Medicare for All has no chance of happening; and why baby-boom icons dominated Super Bowl ads. We also preview President Trump's State of the Union Address, which takes place on Tuesday, February 5, at 9:00 P.M. ET.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Here's a bonus set of links. Last week, Matt Welch created a Twitter poll to see whether listeners preferred the recommendations that Katherine and Peter (a.k.a. the Millennials) or Matt and I (a.k.a. the Olds) make at the end of each editor's roundtable. Here are the results of the poll and a handy-dandy chart of four months of recommended stuff, courtesy of listener Blooshier:

'Railroad's Whisky Co' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

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What comes next in the Virginia governor scandal, why "Medicare for All" ain't happening, and how Baby Boomers are a fatberg clogging America's cultural sewers What comes next in the Virginia governor scandal, why "Medicare for All" ain't happening, and how Baby Boomers are a fatberg clogging America's cultural sewers Reason.com yes 1:03:53
Donald Trump Wants To Fire Nicolás Maduro of Venezuela. Is That a Good Idea?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/jos-ignacio-gudez-podcast/ Sat, 02 Feb 2019 01:20:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/02/01/jos-ignacio-gudez-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/jos-ignacio-gudez-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/jos-ignacio-gudez-podcast/feed/ 63 José Ignacio Guédez, a member of the oppostion party La Causa R, says economic sanctions and political pressure will help restore democracy. Desperate after years of economic disaster and political repression, Venezuelans are protesting in ever-greater numbers against the regime of President Nicolás Maduro, who was re-elected to a second six-year term last year in elections widely denounced as fraudulent.

In January, the Lima Group, an ad hoc consortium of 11 Latin American countries and Canada, refused to recognize Maduro as president. At the same time, Juan Guaidó, the president of the National Assembly, took an oath to serve as interim president of the country. His government has been recognized by members of the Lima Group as well as the Trump administration, which also levied sanctions on Venezuela's oil sector. At the same time, The Wall Street Journal reports that the Trump administration is also pursuing an ambitious "a plan to reshape Latin America," causing many to wonder if a return to a historically disastrous gunboat diplomacy is in the offing.

For today's Reason Podcast, I spoke with José Ignacio Guédez, a member of the opposition party La Causa R, about the dire state of economic and political disaster in Venezuela, why it's important to remove Maduro from power and have a free and fair election, and why the troubled history of American intervention into Latin America complicates the way forward to a peaceful transition of power.

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José Ignacio Guédez, a member of the oppostion party La Causa R, says economic sanctions and political pressure will help restore democracy. José Ignacio Guédez, a member of the oppostion party La Causa R, says economic sanctions and political pressure will help restore democracy. Reason.com yes 20:00
The Secret History of Super Bowl LIII: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/nick-and-matt-talk-superbowl-podcast/ Wed, 30 Jan 2019 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/30/nick-and-matt-talk-superbowl-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/nick-and-matt-talk-superbowl-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/nick-and-matt-talk-superbowl-podcast/feed/ 11 Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch talk about the deep and ever-changing political and cultural meaning of football's biggest game. On Sunday, February 3, the New England Patriots will play the Los Angeles Rams in Super Bowl LIII, one of the year's biggest sporting events.

For today's Reason Podcast, I talked with my colleague Matt Welch, who has written in depth about how the cultural, political, and economic aspects of sports often mirror and influence the direction of society. In a wide-ranging conversation, Matt and I spoke about how the Super Bowl has changed since its first iteration in 1967, how the relationship between fans and athletes in many sports developed since free agency, why politicians and team owners remain remarkably successful in bilking taxpayers out of money for stadiums, the gender dynamics of a sports-crazy father raising two daughters, and more.

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Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch talk about the deep and ever-changing political and cultural meaning of football's biggest game. Nick Gillespie and Matt Welch talk about the deep and ever-changing political and cultural meaning of football's biggest game. Reason.com yes 1:07:57
Are Billionaires a Policy Failure?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/are-billionaires-a-policy-failure/ Mon, 28 Jan 2019 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/28/are-billionaires-a-policy-failure/ https://reason.com/podcast/are-billionaires-a-policy-failure/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/are-billionaires-a-policy-failure/feed/ 30 Assessing Elizabeth Warren's "tippy-top" tax, Howard Schultz's presidential candidacy, Donald Trump's shutdown-shutdown, and more ||| FRANCES M. ROBERTS/Newscom
FRANCES M. ROBERTS/Newscom

Leading 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.) proposes an "annual wealth tax on the tippy-top 0.1%." Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.) maintains that "a system that allows billionaires to coexist with poverty is immoral." Billionaire Starbucks magnate Howard Schultz declares that he's "seriously considering running for president" as an independent. President and purported billionaire Donald Trump announces the end of the partial federal government shutdown. In the wake of widespread media layoffs, journalists fantasize about "benevolent billionaire backers not fixated on maximum growth." And one such billionaire, Jeff Bezos, saves The Expanse from cancellation.

What do these seemingly disparate stories have in common? BILLIONAIRES, THAT'S WHAT. And also, theyall get discussed on this week's Editors' Roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, starring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. The conversation also covers U.S. policy toward turbulent Venezuela, the hero's journey of Rep. Walter Jones (R–S.C.), and a certain generational culture-chasm between the podcast's participants.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'The 3rd' by Anitek is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Trump Announces Deal to End Government Shutdown," by Joe Setyon

"The Government Will Always Be Shut Down," by Matt Welch

"If You Still Think the Shutdown Proves Government Is Important, You're Seeing What You Want to See," by J.D. Tuccille

"Air Safety Is Important. We Shouldn't Let Politics Put It at Risk," by Robert W. Poole, Jr.

"Venezuelan Crisis Boils Over as Opposition Leader Declares Himself President," by Eric Boehm

"Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Calls Climate Change 'Our World War II,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Rep. Walter Jones, Who Supported and Then Denounced Iraq War, Is Dying," by Nick Gillespie

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Assessing Elizabeth Warren's "tippy-top" tax, Howard Schultz's presidential candidacy, Donald Trump's shutdown-shutdown, and more Assessing Elizabeth Warren's "tippy-top" tax, Howard Schultz's presidential candidacy, Donald Trump's shutdown-shutdown, and more Reason.com yes 1:00:15
Why School Choice Is Growing Everywhere: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/andrew-campanella-podcast/ Fri, 25 Jan 2019 19:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/25/andrew-campanella-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/andrew-campanella-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/andrew-campanella-podcast/feed/ 9 Q&A with the president of National School Choice Week, Andrew Campanella National School Choice Week, an annual event that coordinates thousands of events designed to bring attention to alternatives to traditional public K–12 education, is running nationwide through Saturday, January 26. (Go here for more information.) For today's Reason Podcast, I spoke with the group's president, Andrew Campanella, about the remarkable growth of school choice over the past few decades, especially since the introduction of charter schools in the mid-1990s.

About 10 percent of the nation's 50 million K–12 students attend a school they choose rather than following the traditional method of residential assignment, says Campanella, who notes that the trend is getting stronger every year. In a wide-ranging conversation, he argues that school choice is part of a wider social movement toward increasing personalization in many goods and services—and a reflection of the recognition that education is one of the central ways for people to realize their potential.

As a media sponsor of School Choice Week, Reason publishes articles, videos, and podcasts related to school choice during this week. For coverage from past years, go here.

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Q&A with the president of National School Choice Week, Andrew Campanella Q&A with the president of National School Choice Week, Andrew Campanella Reason.com yes 35:09
Government Caused Housing Segregation. Do We Need More Government to Fix the Problem? https://reason.com/podcast/markets-housing-segregation-government/ Wed, 23 Jan 2019 20:05:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/23/markets-housing-segregation-government/ https://reason.com/podcast/markets-housing-segregation-government/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/markets-housing-segregation-government/feed/ 11 The Manhattan Institute's Howard Husock debates Economic Policy Institute's Richard Rothstein at the Soho Forum. "Racial segregation in America was, to a large degree, engineered by policy makers in Washington," writes the Economic Policy Institute's Richard Rothstein in the February 2019 issue of Reason, in an article adapted from his book, The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How our Government Segregated America (2017).

The Manhattan Institute's Howard Husock agrees, calling Rothstein's book an "admirable work" in a 2017 review. But the two part company over Rothstein's confidence "that government today is the appropriate instrument to effect housing integration" and his dismissal of the idea that "the private housing market, guided by rigorously enforced antidiscrimination laws, offers African-American buyers the surest route to wealth accumulation and upward mobility."

On January 14, 2019, the Soho Forum hosted a debate between Rothstein and Husock. The resolution read: "Since the federal government fostered housing segregation in the 20th century, the government should foster housing integration in the 21st."

The Soho Forum, which is partnered with the Reason Foundation, is a monthly series held at the SubCulture Theater in Manhattan's East Village. It hosts Oxford-style debates, in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious.

Husock prevailed by convincing over 13 percent of audience members to come over to his side.

Comedian Dave Smith, host of the podcast Part of the Problem, was the opening act.

Rothstein is also a fellow of the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and is the author of Grading Education: Getting Accountability Right (2008), Class and Schools: Using Social, Economic and Educational Reform to Close the Black-White Achievement Gap (2004), and other titles.

Husock is the author of Philanthropy Under Fire (2013) and The Trillion-Dollar Housing Mistake: The Failure of American Housing Policy (2003). From 1987 through 2006, he was director of case studies in public policy and management at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

Edited by Todd Krainin.

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The Manhattan Institute's Howard Husock debates Economic Policy Institute's Richard Rothstein at the Soho Forum. The Manhattan Institute's Howard Husock debates Economic Policy Institute's Richard Rothstein at the Soho Forum. Reason.com yes 1:38:19
Can We Just Light Twitter on Fire After This Past Weekend?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/can-we-just-light-twitter-on-fire/ Tue, 22 Jan 2019 21:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/22/can-we-just-light-twitter-on-fire/ https://reason.com/podcast/can-we-just-light-twitter-on-fire/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/can-we-just-light-twitter-on-fire/feed/ 179 Covingtongate, <em>Buzzfeed</em>'s bomb, Baby Hitler, Kamalamentum…maybe it's time to pull the plug. ||| MSNBC
MSNBC

On Day 4 of the Great Covington Kerfuffle, your friendly neighborhood Reason editors—Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch, and Peter Suderman—staggered into the recording booth for the Editors' Roundtable version of the Reason Podcast, and tried to squeeze out any available lessons about journalism, social media, and getting through this great thing called life.

Along the way we talked about Buzzfeed's investigatory implosion, the latest in government shutdown, Kamala Harris' official announcement that she's running for president, the wonderful things we learned at LibertyCon, and (of course) Baby Hitler. It might not be the podcast America needs, but certainly the one it deserves.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser and Mark McDaniel.

Relevant links from the show:

"The Media Wildly Mischaracterized That Video of Covington Catholic Students Confronting a Native American Veteran," by Robby Soave

"If You Still Think Nick Sandmann's Smile Is Proof of Racism, You're Seeing What You Want to See," by Robby Soave

"Twitter Suspends User Who First Spread Covington Catholic Video," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Will Donald Trump Be Impeached Over a Hotel?" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"If You Want to See the Future of Political Trolling—and Elections—Look to Alabama," by Nick Gillespie

"Trump's Dreamer-for-Wall Proposal Isn't a Good Faith Deal," by Shikha Dalmia

"Kamala Harris' New Book Tries to Massage Her Record as a Prosecutor, But the Facts Aren't Pretty," by C.J. Ciaramella

"Rather Than Running for President, Maybe Joe Biden Should Just Launch an Apology Tour," by Scott Shackford

"Justin Amash: The Libertarian Party Shouldn't Nominate a 'Squishy' Republican in 2020," by Matt Welch

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Covingtongate, Buzzfeed's bomb, Baby Hitler, Kamalamentum…maybe it's time to pull the plug. Covingtongate, Buzzfeed's bomb, Baby Hitler, Kamalamentum…maybe it's time to pull the plug. Reason.com yes 57:52
Meet Two Feminist Journalists Who Are Saying #MeNeither: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/leah-nancy-podcast/ Fri, 18 Jan 2019 21:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/18/leah-nancy-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/leah-nancy-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/leah-nancy-podcast/feed/ 25 Nancy Rommelmann and Leah McSweeney on the "toxic femininity" of Asia Argento, anti-Semitism at the Women's March, and 21st-century sexual liberation. Journalists Nancy Rommelmann and Leah McSweeney make no apologies for critiquing what they've called the "toxic femininity" of Asia Argento and the anti-Semitism of some of the leaders of this weekend's Women's March in Washington, D.C.

Argento, they tell me in a new Reason podcast, acted like Harvey Weinstein when it came out that she had slept with a 17-year-old boy she had known for a decade. She denied it, attacked the credibility of her accuser, and paid him hush money. In a blockbuster December story for Tablet co-authored with Jacob Seigel, McSweeney documented that top organizers of this Saturday's Women's March, which began as a protest against sexism and Donald Trump, "claimed that Jews were proven to have been leaders of the American slave trade" and pushed Jewish women out of leadership roles. The story was picked up by The New York Times and other outlets and has led to a number of high-profile supporters and organizations pulling their support for the March, especially after the organizers refused to denounce Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, the source for much crackpot history regarding Jews and the slave trade. After the two created a YouTube channel called #MeNeither, where they critique aspects of contemporary feminism and talk about contemporary call-out culture, an outraged viewer started a campaign against Ristretto Roasters, the Portland-based coffee-shop chain owned by Rommelmann's husband.

McSweeney, who is the founder of the punk-influenced clothing line Married To the Mob (sample t-shirt: "Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Bleeding"), and Rommelmann, author of 2018's To The Bridge: A True Story of Motherhood and Murder and a Reason contributor, tell me they are feminists who believe in equal opportunity and legal treatment for women but recoil from the excesses of current identity politics. It's a wide-ranging, foul-mouthed, and frank conversation about contemporary sexual mores.

Bonus link: McSweeney does a podcast called Improper Etiquette with Laura Stylez. Check it out here.

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Photo Credit: R Barnswell.

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Nancy Rommelmann and Leah McSweeney on the "toxic femininity" of Asia Argento, anti-Semitism at the Women's March, and 21st-century sexual liberation. Nancy Rommelmann and Leah McSweeney on the "toxic femininity" of Asia Argento, anti-Semitism at the Women's March, and 21st-century sexual liberation. Reason.com yes 38:45
Try Common Sense and Dump Old Right-Left Ideologies, Says Philip K. Howard in New Book: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/philip-k-howard-podcast/ Wed, 16 Jan 2019 20:40:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/16/philip-k-howard-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/philip-k-howard-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/philip-k-howard-podcast/feed/ 49 He also offers up concrete proposals not just to reform government but to route around it and get on with our lives already. Philip K Howard burst on the scene over 20 years ago with his best-selling book, The Death of Common Sense: How Law Is Suffocating America, which argued that out-of-control lawsuits and and rules and regulations were choking off vitality, innovation, and common decency. In 2002, he founded Common Good, a nonprofit whose credo is "simplify government, put humans back in charge, and cut mindless red tape." In 2014, I interviewed Howard about his book The Rule of Nobody.

A lawyer by training and profession, Howard's new book is Try Common Sense: Replacing Failed Ideologies of Left and Right. I spoke with him about how Americans might route around the federal government and get on with their lives.

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Photo Credit: Common Good

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He also offers up concrete proposals not just to reform government but to route around it and get on with our lives already. He also offers up concrete proposals not just to reform government but to route around it and get on with our lives already. Reason.com yes 53:32
Are Government Shutdowns Good for Libertarians?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/are-government-shutdowns-good/ Mon, 14 Jan 2019 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/14/are-government-shutdowns-good/ https://reason.com/podcast/are-government-shutdowns-good/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/are-government-shutdowns-good/feed/ 30 Rebutting Krugman, cracking on Graham, and searching in vain for "freedom" in a caucus. Libertarian Party volunteers clean up the National Mall on Jan. 6, 2019. ||| lp.org
lp.org

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R–S.C.) has had an interesting week of defending President Donald Trump's bluster in the ongoing government shutdown, most recently yesterday on Fox News, which is where we start this week's Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition.

Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and yours truly talk about national emergencies, prohibition metaphors, opportunistic defenders of "freedom," and whether Paul Krugman was right when he called the shutdown a "big, beautiful libertarian experiment." Also up for discussion are the negative reactions to Democratic presidential contender Tulsi Gabbard, the hawkish anti-Trumpery of the D.C. foreign policy/intelligence consensus, and the modern capitalistic miracle of eyewear.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Hallon' by Christian Bjoerklund is licensed under CC BY NC SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Sorry, Paul Krugman, the Government Shutdown Is No Great Libertarian Experiment," by Peter Suderman

"Trump's National Emergency Is an American Obscenity," by Matt Welch

"'Our Porous Border' and Other Myths of Trump's Increasingly Popular Wall Mania," by Nick Gillespie

"Freedom Caucus Chair Mark Meadows Supports Asset Forfeiture, National Emergency Declaration to Fund Wall," by Robby Soave

"The Democrats' Alternative to Trump's Wall Isn't Good for Privacy or Property Rights Either," by Christian Britschgi

"Mitch McConnell is Keeping the Senate Out of the Shutdown Fight. It's a Hypocritical Abdication of Congressional Responsibility," by Peter Suderman

"Please, TSA Workers, Don't Come Back," by J.D. Tuccille

"For Once, the TSA Is Right," by Joe Setyon

"Tulsi Gabbard, Iraq War Veteran and Skeptic of America's Wars, Will Run for President in 2020," by Eric Boehm

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Rebutting Krugman, cracking on Graham, and searching in vain for "freedom" in a caucus. Rebutting Krugman, cracking on Graham, and searching in vain for "freedom" in a caucus. Reason.com yes 58:58
When it Comes To Trump, the Bulwark's Charlie Sykes Is 'All Out of Fucks To Give': Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/charlie-sykes-podcast/ Fri, 11 Jan 2019 20:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/11/charlie-sykes-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/charlie-sykes-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/charlie-sykes-podcast/feed/ 29 Q&A about the rise of right-wing "grifters" such as Charlie Kirk, the death of <em>The Weekly Standard</em>, and the future of the American right. "The conservative [movement] needs to be rethought in a variety of ways," says Charlie Sykes, the editor in chief of The Bulwark, the conservative website started in part by William Kristol in the wake of the demise of The Weekly Standard. "There's no question that Trumpism represents a repudiation of much of the conservative tradition, but we're not going to be able to simply turn the clock back."

A longtime radio host and best-selling author based in Milwaukee and early critic of Donald Trump, Sykes says that The Bulwark, whose motto is "conservatism conserved," is a place where the broadly defined right, including libertarians, can go to think through what happened to the Republican Party and what might come next in American politics. Calling Turning Point USA's Charlie Kirk an opportunistic "grifter," Sykes tells Reason that "to the extent that Republicans lash themselves to the mast of Trumpism…they make it more possible that we're going to have President Bernie Sanders and fully nationalized health care."

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Q&A about the rise of right-wing "grifters" such as Charlie Kirk, the death of The Weekly Standard, and the future of the American right. Q&A about the rise of right-wing "grifters" such as Charlie Kirk, the death of The Weekly Standard, and the future of the American right. Reason.com yes 41:53
Assault Weapon Bans Are All About Appearance https://reason.com/podcast/dianne-feinstein-assault-weapon-ban/ Fri, 11 Jan 2019 19:50:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/11/dianne-feinstein-assault-weapon-ban/ https://reason.com/podcast/dianne-feinstein-assault-weapon-ban/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/dianne-feinstein-assault-weapon-ban/feed/ 81 Sen. Dianne Feinstein's latest bill classifies firearms not by what they do but based on how they look. A string of high-profile mass shootings over the past few years has spawned a movement to outlaw so-called assault weapons, in particular the popular AR-15.

On January 9, Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D–Calif.) introduced a federal bill to ban assault weapons—legislation that's been depicted as life-saving, common sense policy. But its definition of an assault weapon is totally arbitrary.

Proposals like Feinstein's latest draft bill leave shooters with plenty of equally deadly alternatives.

"An assault weapon is whatever is covered by an assault weapon ban," says Reason Senior Editor Jacob Sullum, author of a feature story on the topic in our June 2018 issue. "The criteria that are used to identify assault weapons are things that have little or nothing to do with how useful or how deadly an assault weapon is in the hands of a mass murderer."

The federal government banned assault weapons in 1994, when President Bill Clinton signed a bill also sponsored by Sen. Feinstein. That legislation expired 10 years later. Meanwhile, seven states and the District of Columbia have enacted their own assault weapon bans.

There's little evidence that the 1994 legislation reduced gun deaths, in part because it was mostly a symbolic gesture.

"Unless you really delve into the specifics of what these bills do, you don't understand how utterly arbitrary they are," says Sullum.

In both the original 1994 bill and the new version of the legislation, assault weapons are classified not by what they do but by how they look.

Assault weapon bans typically use criteria like pistol grips, adjustable stocks, threaded barrels, and barrels shrouds to determine whether or not a gun is an assault weapon. These features are cosmetic.

"You can have a gun with any one of those features and it is now an assault weapon," says Sullum. "Exactly the same gun without those features is not an assault weapon. And in fact, there are a bunch of examples like that."

To illustrate this point, compare the Ruger Mini-14 Ranch Rifle with the AR-15. One looks like a hunting rifle and the other looks like a military weapon. Although the rifles have different manufacturers and lineages, for all practical purposes they are identical. They fire at the same rate, they can fire the same caliber of ammunition, and because they have similar barrel lengths, the ballistics are almost identical. But only one is an "assault weapon."

Another misconception is that assault weapons are "automatic" firearms, which fire continuously until the trigger is released or the gun runs out of ammunition. The federal government banned the manufacture of new automatic weapons for civilian use in 1986.

Most modern civilian guns are semi-automatic, which means they only fire one round per trigger pull.

"But if you're talking about how many rounds you get out of the gun within a certain amount of time," says Sullum, "any semi-automatic is gonna fire be capable of firing the same number of rounds."

Another myth is that assault weapons are more powerful than other guns. In reality, the power of a firearm depends mainly on the cartridge, not the gun. Again, compare the Ruger Mini-14 Ranch Rifle with the AR-15. Both shoot the same .223 caliber bullet, at the same velocity.

"You will see that lots of hunting rifles are more powerful [and] can do more damage at the same distance than so-called assault weapons," says Sullum.

One of the most common cartridges used for hunting is the .308 Winchester, which has more than double the impact force when compared to the ammunition used in an AR-15.

Another common refrain is that assault weapons can fire more rounds than other guns before reloading. But it's the magazine, which is just a detachable box and a spring, that determines how many times you can fire. And many guns that are not identified as "assault weapons" accept high-capacity magazines.

"You can get high-capacity magazines or large-capacity magazines, meaning holding more than 10 rounds…for guns that are not considered to be assault weapons," says Sullum. "So again, this is not a feature that distinguishes assault weapons from other kinds of guns."

Banning guns solely based on appearance is counterproductive. It makes it difficult to have a good-faith discussion about effective solutions to gun violence.

"I'm not going to say everyone should own an AR-15," says Sullum, "but people have their reasons for wanting to have them and the government shouldn't be second-guessing those reasons without a very powerful justification. And the justification offered for banning assault weapons is virtually nonexistent because it doesn't make sense."

Produced and edited by Mark McDaniel. Cameras by Jim Epstein, Zach Weismuller, and McDaniel.

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Sen. Dianne Feinstein's latest bill classifies firearms not by what they do but based on how they look. Sen. Dianne Feinstein's latest bill classifies firearms not by what they do but based on how they look. Reason.com yes
'We Are Fighting for Free Speech Every Single Day,' Says Students for Liberty's Wolf von Laer: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/sfl-wolf-von-laer-and-david-clement-podc/ Wed, 09 Jan 2019 21:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/09/sfl-wolf-von-laer-and-david-clement-podc/ https://reason.com/podcast/sfl-wolf-von-laer-and-david-clement-podc/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/sfl-wolf-von-laer-and-david-clement-podc/feed/ 17 What to expect at LibertyCon, the annual meeting of the largest libertarian student group on the planet (plus how to get 40 percent off registration). "We are fighting for free speech every single day," says Students for Liberty's CEO Wolf von Laer, who also contends that college campuses around the world are "breeding grounds for socialism."

I spoke with Laer, who has a Ph.D. in political economy from King's College (London), and David Clement, director of external relations, about SFL's upcoming LibertyCon, which takes place in Washington, D.C., January 17-20, and pulls together 2,000 students, activists, and libertarians from all over the world.

Reason is a sponsor of LibertyCon and folks such as Katherine Mangu-Ward, Matt Welch, Peter Suderman, Robby Soave, and Elizabeth Nolan Brown will join Libertarian Party Vice Presidential nominee Bill Weld, FCC head Ajit Pai, legal giants Randy Barnett and Alan Dershowitz, and others for the conference. During lunch on Saturday, Reason will present a "live" version of the magazine, featuring some of your favorite journalists, the musical styling of Remy, and the comedy of Andrew Heaton and Austin Bragg.

Go here for a list of speakers and use the code REASON to get a 40 percent discount on registration.

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What to expect at LibertyCon, the annual meeting of the largest libertarian student group on the planet (plus how to get 40 percent off registration). What to expect at LibertyCon, the annual meeting of the largest libertarian student group on the planet (plus how to get 40 percent off registration). Reason.com yes 33:12
Does Tucker Carlson Get Anything Right About Libertarians?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/does-tucker-carlson-get-anything-right/ Mon, 07 Jan 2019 19:35:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/07/does-tucker-carlson-get-anything-right/ https://reason.com/podcast/does-tucker-carlson-get-anything-right/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/does-tucker-carlson-get-anything-right/feed/ 84 What conservatives against "market fundamentalism" can tell you about libertarians without power ||| Fox News Channel
Fox News Channel

It's rare that a 15-minute cable news spiel gets talked about even one day later, let alone five, but here we are with Fox News host Tucker Carlson's headline-making monologue asserting that "market capitalism is not a religion, it's a tool," warning that "any economic system that weakens or destroy families is not worth having," and serially calling out libertarians by name.

So Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Matt Welch and Peter Suderman begin today's Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition, with an extended conversation about what Carlson gets right and (mostly) wrong, and how his critique overlaps both with modern reformoconism and some elements of Elizabeth Warren-style populism. The discussion also ranges across Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the "military version of eminent domain," and best practices for purging children's toys.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Valse in D-flat major "Minute Waltz" by Chopin, played by Muriel Nguyen Xuan is licensed under CC BY SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Tucker Carlson Thinks the Problem With America Is Market Capitalism," by Timothy Sandefur

"Conservatives Are Wrong to Call for Government 'Trust Busting,'" by Steven Greenhut

"Ivanka and Conservatives Want to Raid Social Security to Pay for Parental Leave," by Shikha Dalmia

"Increasing Top Tax Brackets Is Easier Than Increasing Revenue Over Time," by Nick Gillespie

"How Payday Lenders and Check Cashers Help the Poor," by Todd Krainin

"What the Hell Is the 'Military Version of Eminent Domain'?" by Joe Setyon

"Trump's Terrible Record on Property Rights," by Ilya Somin

"Legal or Not, Trump Shouldn't Declare a 'National Emergency' To Build His Wall," by Joe Setyon

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What conservatives against "market fundamentalism" can tell you about libertarians without power What conservatives against "market fundamentalism" can tell you about libertarians without power Reason.com yes 1:04:39
'America Really Was the First Country Founded on Individualism': Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/jonathan-hoenig-podcast/ Fri, 04 Jan 2019 20:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/04/jonathan-hoenig-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/jonathan-hoenig-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/jonathan-hoenig-podcast/feed/ 13 Jonathan Hoenig, a devotee of Ayn Rand, founder of Capitalist Pig investments, and editor of <em>The New Textbook of Americanism</em>, isn't pulling any punches. In 1946, the novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand started writing Textbook of Americanism, a series of brief and accessible essays that she felt would define the essential ideas and character of her adopted homeland. Publishing them in a small magazine called The Vigil in the form of answers to basic questions, Rand only completed nine sections, which ranged from "What is the basic issue in the world today?" to "What is the basic principle of America?" to "What is the proper function of government?"

Over 70 years later, Rand's dream sees its completion in A New Textbook of Americanism, a collection edited by Jonathan Hoenig, a Rand devotee who founded the investment fund Capitalist Pig and appears regularly on Fox News, where he's one of the few guests to call out Donald Trump for his protectionism, cronyism, and anti-immigrant stances. The new volume reprints Rand's original contributions while adding fresh new material from a host of contemporary writers associated with the Ayn Rand Institute, including Leonard Peikoff, Yaron Brook, Amy Peikoff, Andrew Bernstein, and others. The new essays are wide-ranging and provocative, answering such questions as "How to Recognize a Nazi," "How Are Fortunes Made in a Capitalist System?," and "What Should a Distinctively American Foreign Policy Do?"

For today's podcast, I spoke with Hoenig about what Rand meant by Americanism, why that's important, and whether he's optimistic about a country that he himself says is growing more collectivist on both the right and the left. We also talked about the fault lines between Rand's Objectivism and the modern libertarian movement, Rand's argument for complete abortion rights and her thoroughgoing secularism, and what it will take to revive the sort of individualism that Hoenig, like Rand, says is the essential foundation of America.

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Jonathan Hoenig, a devotee of Ayn Rand, founder of Capitalist Pig investments, and editor of The New Textbook of Americanism, isn't pulling any punches. Jonathan Hoenig, a devotee of Ayn Rand, founder of Capitalist Pig investments, and editor of The New Textbook of Americanism, isn't pulling any punches. Reason.com yes 50:24
Mitt Romney Is Both Right and Wrong: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/mitt-romney-is-both-right-and-wrong/ Wed, 02 Jan 2019 19:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2019/01/02/mitt-romney-is-both-right-and-wrong/ https://reason.com/podcast/mitt-romney-is-both-right-and-wrong/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/mitt-romney-is-both-right-and-wrong/feed/ 61 The #Resistance GOP mixes tonal civility with foreign-policy hawkishness and immigration amnesia. ||| Reason
Reason

The man whose immigration policies Donald Trump once called "maniacal" and "mean-spirited" has D.C. all in a tizzy with his new #Resistance op-ed, as Robby Soave detailed this morning. So does Mitt Romney have a point? Or is he whitewashing his own contributions to incivil politics and unsound policy?

"Both" is pretty much the conclusion of today's Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. And speaking of 2020 speculation, we also discuss Elizabeth Warren, Justin Amash, and (of course!) Dave Barry.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Auld Lang Syne' by Wooden Shjips is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Senator-Elect Mitt Romney, Welcome to the Resistance," by Robby Soave

"Mitt Romney Reminds Us That Trump Isn't as Extreme on Immigration as the 2012 GOP," by Matt Welch

"Consultant in Chief," by Peter Suderman

"House Dems' Plan to Reopen the Government Probably Won't Work. Thank Trump," by Joe Setyon

"'We've Moved Off the Five.' Trump Already Caving on Border Wall Demands. Good for Him," by Nick Gillespie

"The Government Shutdown Shows Congress Is More Incompetent Than Ever," by Veronique de Rugy

"Surprise! Looks Like Elizabeth Warren Is Running for President!" By Joe Setyon

"Sen. Warren Has a Plan to Socialize Pharmaceuticals," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Elizabeth Warren Challenges Trump's Protectionist Tariffs for Not Being Protectionist Enough," by Eric Boehm

"Democratic Presidential Hopefuls Have Big Plans for 2020: They Want to Spend More Money!" by Peter Suderman

"The Complex, Childish Identity Politics of Elizabeth Warren's Native Heritage," by Nancy Rommelmann

"Elizabeth Warren's Terrible Policy Views Are More Disqualifying Than Her Dubious Ancestry Claims," by Robby Soave

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The #Resistance GOP mixes tonal civility with foreign-policy hawkishness and immigration amnesia. The #Resistance GOP mixes tonal civility with foreign-policy hawkishness and immigration amnesia. Reason.com yes 59:08
The Future of Science: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/the-future-of-science/ Fri, 28 Dec 2018 18:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/28/the-future-of-science/ https://reason.com/podcast/the-future-of-science/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/the-future-of-science/feed/ 7 Michael Shermer, Ron Bailey, and Jim Epstein talk poverty-eradication, genomics, and blockchain at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration ||| Reason
Reason

In the September 1968 issue of the newly created Reason magazine, founding editor Lanny Friedlander dreamed up a scenario of individualized telecommunications beyond just about anyone's contemporary imaginations. "Our man sits down to his telephone," Friedlander wrote. "It is a deluxe model, with a television screen, television camera, teletype outlet, electronic writing pad, copier, and, yes, a handset. He flips on the machine and speaks towards the television screen (there is a mike and speaker next to it). He identifies himself and asks for his "mail.'"

Forward-looking and occasionally prescient writing about the wonders of science is baked right into this magazine's DNA. So it was altogether appropriate at our 50th anniversary celebration in November to convene a panel, which I was fortunate to moderate, on where the future is taking us. Giving us that glimpse were Science Correspondent Ronald Bailey, Reason TV Managing Editor Jim Epstein (who talked about blockchain), and legendary skeptic Michael Shermer.

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Michael Shermer, Ron Bailey, and Jim Epstein talk poverty-eradication, genomics, and blockchain at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration Michael Shermer, Ron Bailey, and Jim Epstein talk poverty-eradication, genomics, and blockchain at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration Reason.com yes 49:18
Democratizing Gun Production, Education, and Media: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/democratizing-gun-production/ Wed, 26 Dec 2018 18:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2018/12/26/democratizing-gun-production/ https://reason.com/podcast/democratizing-gun-production/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/democratizing-gun-production/feed/ 11 J.D. Tuccille, Lisa Snell, and Rob Long discuss the democratization of everything at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. 3D Printed Gun

What happens when individual consumers—not government bureaucrats, not corporate chieftains, not elite gatekeepers—own the means of their own production? For a half-century, Reason has been giving variants on a five-word answer to that question: Unpredictable and mostly wonderful things.

At our 50th anniversary celebration in Los Angeles this November, we summoned to discuss the democratization of everything an eclectic panel composed of columnist J.D. Tuccille, lover of DIY weaponry and illegal black markets; Reason Foundation Education Director Lisa Snell; and TV showrunner/podcast pioneer Rob Long. I was the moderator.

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J.D. Tuccille, Lisa Snell, and Rob Long discuss the democratization of everything at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. J.D. Tuccille, Lisa Snell, and Rob Long discuss the democratization of everything at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Reason.com yes 49:12
Donald Trump's Libertarian Christmas?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/donald-trumps-libertarian-christmas/ Fri, 21 Dec 2018 20:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/21/donald-trumps-libertarian-christmas/ https://reason.com/podcast/donald-trumps-libertarian-christmas/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/donald-trumps-libertarian-christmas/feed/ 18 <em>Reason</em> editors' best and worst moments of 2018, including the president's welcome and long-overdue drawdown from Afghanistan It has been a wild week for President Donald Trump, Congress, U.S. foreign policy, criminal justice reform, the stock markets, you name it. The great Twitter follow Jen the Libertarian may haveput it best:

Is this, at long last, the Libertarian Moment? Or at least a Libertarian Christmas? Thus begins a special year-in-review edition of the Reason Podcast's editors' roundtable, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. We touch on all of the above (especially the welcome Afghanistan withdrawal), plus fiscal calamities, poverty alleviation, identity politics, space rockets, journalism, and Old Grandpa Dad's excited discovery of music delivery systems.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"Bringing Troops Home From Syria and Afghanistan Also Brings Fits of Bipartisan Rage," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"It Looks Like Trump Is About to Pull the U.S. Out of Afghanistan, Too," by Joe Setyon

"Defense Secretary James Mattis Resigning," by Joe Setyon

"'We've Beaten [ISIS]…Now, It's Time for our Troops To Come Back Home,'" by Nick Gillespie

"Even Opponents of Trump's Wall Should Root for a Government Shutdown Today," by Shikha Dalmia

"Congress Passes FIRST STEP Act, Sending Criminal Justice Reform to Trump's Desk," by C.J. Ciaramella

"A Deficit-Happy Government May Lead to a Debt-Driven Financial Crisis," by Veronique de Rugy

"Trump, on a Future Debt Crisis: 'Yeah, But I Won't Be Here,'" by Matt Welch

"When the Bubble Bursts, We're So Screwed," by Matt Welch

"3 Statistics That Will Make You Smarter and Happier," by Ronald Bailey

"Trump vs. Clinton vs. Everything Good," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

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Reason editors' best and worst moments of 2018, including the president's welcome and long-overdue drawdown from Afghanistan Reason editors' best and worst moments of 2018, including the president's welcome and long-overdue drawdown from Afghanistan Reason.com yes 1:04:29
Finding a Cure for Our Fiscal Insanity: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/finding-a-cure-for-our-fiscal-insanity/ Wed, 19 Dec 2018 15:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/19/finding-a-cure-for-our-fiscal-insanity/ https://reason.com/podcast/finding-a-cure-for-our-fiscal-insanity/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/finding-a-cure-for-our-fiscal-insanity/feed/ 25 Peter Suderman, Len Gilroy, and C. Boyden Gray diagnose the country's many fiscal woes, and offer some solutions, at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Ruh-roh. ||| U.S. Treasury
U.S. Treasury

The national debt is north of $21 trillion, the annual deficit is nearing the $1 trillion threshold, the federal government can't afford its old-age social insurance programs, state governments can't afford their public-sector pension promises, and all this fiscal precariousness comes at the end of a near-historically long expansions in both the stock market and the economy writ large. Gee, what could go wrong?

So when Reason celebrated its 50th anniversary in November, we presented much diagnosis of, and some cures for, our fiscal insanity, through the expert testimony of an all-star panel: Former White House counsel and ambassador to the European Union C. Boyden Gray (who also moonlights as an Adam Smith champion and Reason Foundation trustee); the foundation's Pension Integrity Project Managing Director Len Gilroy, and Reason.com Managing Editor Peter Suderman. I moderated.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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Peter Suderman, Len Gilroy, and C. Boyden Gray diagnose the country's many fiscal woes, and offer some solutions, at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Peter Suderman, Len Gilroy, and C. Boyden Gray diagnose the country's many fiscal woes, and offer some solutions, at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Reason.com yes 45:07
Everybody Wants to Regulate the Internet Except Ajit Pai: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/everybody-wants-to-regulate-the-internet/ Mon, 17 Dec 2018 19:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/17/everybody-wants-to-regulate-the-internet/ https://reason.com/podcast/everybody-wants-to-regulate-the-internet/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/everybody-wants-to-regulate-the-internet/feed/ 21 One year after Net Neutrality, connection speed is up, the discrimination critics feared is non-existent, and the debate about Internet regulation is abysmal. The Charlie's Angels reboot is lit af ||| Matt Welch
Matt Welch

Sometimes it's worth divining lessons from a news story in which man stubbornly refuses to bite dog. Such is the case with the one-year anniversary of the Federal Communications Commission ending the set of regulations misleadingly known as "net neutrality." The predicted ensuing clampdown never materialized, and instead way too much of the political spectrum has moved on to calling for other sectors of the federal government to…uh, clamp down on internet-related companies.

So kicks off the discussion on the Monday editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and me. We delve into social media hearings, Section 230 semiotics, and (sadly!) stupid Donald Trump tweets. The gang also gets in a bit of contentious funerealism over the demise of The Weekly Standard, so do stick around until the end.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Shake It!' by Jahzzar is licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"One Year Ago Today, the FCC Killed the Internet," by Eric Boehm

"California Imposed Its Own 'Net Neutrality' Law. The Feds Aren't Happy About It," by Declan McCullagh

"Net Neutrality Is Officially Dead. That's a Victory for Free Speech," by Nick Gillespie

"Internet Cop," by Peter Suderman

"Google Hearings Force the Question: Do We Really Want 'Regulation by Federal and State Governments' of 'Today's Disruptive Technologies'?" by Nick Gillespie

"Guess Which Congressman Thought a Malfunctioning iPhone Was Google CEO Sundar Pichai's Fault," by Robby Soave

"Are You Ready for the 'Inevitable' Clampdown on Tech and the Media?" by Nick Gillespie

"Expect More Conservative Purges on Social Media If Republicans Target Section 230," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Senator Ron Wyden (Co-Author of § 230) Trying to Pressure Internet Companies to Restrict "Indecent" Ideas?" by Eugene Volokh

"Donald Trump Suggests Unfair Media Coverage of His Presidency Could Be Illegal," by Robby Soave

"Making the Fairness Doctrine Great Again," by Thomas Winslow Hazlett

"The Weekly Standard turns 10," by W. James Antle, III

"The Weekly Standard's case against laissez faire," by Walter Olson

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One year after Net Neutrality, connection speed is up, the discrimination critics feared is non-existent, and the debate about Internet regulation is abysmal. One year after Net Neutrality, connection speed is up, the discrimination critics feared is non-existent, and the debate about Internet regulation is abysmal. Reason.com yes 1:04:40
A Crackdown on Cash and Bitcoin? Curbing Crime vs. Empowering the Surveillance State https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-control-crypto-and-curtail-cas/ Fri, 14 Dec 2018 16:11:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/14/should-we-control-crypto-and-curtail-cas/ https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-control-crypto-and-curtail-cas/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-control-crypto-and-curtail-cas/feed/ 22 Economists Kenneth Rogoff and Lawrence H. White face off over what the impact would be of a ban on cryptocurrency and phaseout of the $100 bill. "Governments of the advanced industrial economies should phase out the use of paper money in the form of large-denomination notes and sharply restrict the use of cryptocurrencies."

That was the resolution at a public debate hosted by the Soho Forum on December 3, 2018. Arguing the affirmative was the Harvard economist Kenneth Rogoff, a former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund. Lawrence H. White, a professor of economics at George Mason University and a senior fellow at the Cato Institute, argued against the resolution. Soho Forum Director Gene Epstein moderated the debate.

The Soho Forum, which is sponsored by the Reason Foundation, hosts Oxford-style debates in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event—yes, no, or undecided—and the side that gains the most ground is victorious. In a close finish, White prevailed by convincing five percent of audience members to come over to his side. Rogoff picked up two percent.

Rogoff's book 2016 book The Curse of Cash (2016) argues that the U.S. government should phase out most paper currency. His monthly syndicated column on global economic issues is published in over 50 countries. White, a leading theorist on free banking, is the author most recently of The Clash of Economic Ideas (2012).

Comedian Dave Smith, host of the podcast Part of the Problem, opened the program.

Edited by Todd Krainin

Photo Credit: Brett Raney

"Divider" by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Attribution License.

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Economists Kenneth Rogoff and Lawrence H. White face off over what the impact would be of a ban on cryptocurrency and phaseout of the $100 bill. Economists Kenneth Rogoff and Lawrence H. White face off over what the impact would be of a ban on cryptocurrency and phaseout of the $100 bill. Reason.com yes 1:33:02
With Reason on "Freedom's Ramparts, America's Tomorrow's Will Always Dawn Brightly": Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/mitch-daniels-speech-podcast/ Wed, 12 Dec 2018 21:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/12/mitch-daniels-speech-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/mitch-daniels-speech-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/mitch-daniels-speech-podcast/feed/ 4 Listen to former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels' keynote at our 50th anniversary dinner. Today, we've got a special podcast: The speech that Mitch Daniels, the former two-term governor of Indiana and the current president of Purdue University, gave at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration, held in Los Angeles in early November.

A thinking man's politician, Daniels' achievements as governor included leasing the money-losing Indiana toll road for $4 billion, passing a universal school voucher program, and making Indiana one of the most economically free states in the country. At Purdue, he's managed to keep tuition costs down while also emphatically backing free speech and academic freedom. In his remarks, he told the audience that Reason has "with nearly unique persistence and unique fidelity to principle, upheld our liberties, constantly innovating and advocating measures to guard and extend them….With you on freedom's ramparts, America's tomorrow's will always dawn brightly."

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Listen to former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels' keynote at our 50th anniversary dinner. Listen to former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels' keynote at our 50th anniversary dinner. Reason.com yes 22:39
How Psychedelics Changed the Life of One of America's Leading Novelists: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/tao-lin-podcast/ Tue, 11 Dec 2018 22:45:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/11/tao-lin-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/tao-lin-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/tao-lin-podcast/feed/ 12 Tao Lin's <em>Trip</em> details how the author's experience with LSD, DMT, psilocybin, and more blew his mind while making him more human. Psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs are enjoying a revival—as agents of personal pleasure, mind expansion, and conventional medicine. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently designated psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, as a "breakthrough therapy" for treatment of depression. MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy, has been similarly designated as a breakthrough therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder.

Earlier this year, two major books about psychedelics came out. Michael Pollan's How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us about Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence is a relatively conventional history and memoir that drew praise from Reason's Jacob Sullum for recovering the history of "psychedelics' potential for facilitating psychotherapy, promoting the rehabilitation of addicts, and relieving end-of-life anxiety" before Timothy Leary and others promoted such drugs as the stuff of total political and cultural revolution. "Psychedelics have been politicized, medicalized, and spiritualized," asks Sullum in his review. "Will they ever be personalized?"

Which brings me to that second book, Trip: Psychedelics, Alienation, and Change, written by acclaimed novelist Tao Lin. Born in 1983 to immigrants from Taiwan and raised in Florida, Lin is a critical darling of the contemporary literary scene (Bret Easton Ellis has declared him to be "the most interesting prose stylist of his generation"). His books Taipei, Richard Yates, Shoplifting from American Apparel, and others are populated by disaffected young people who take copious amounts of drugs, especially downers such as Xanax and prescription opioids. Trip is an excruciatingly personal non-fiction account of the author's use of psychedelics as part of a "sustained, conscious effort…to not drift toward meaninglessness, depression, disempowering forms of resignation, and bleak ideologies like existentialism." "Weird is the compass setting," writes Lin at one point, quoting Terence McKenna (1946-2000), who helped popularize magic mushrooms and inspire rave culture. Trip is certainly weird, but like the most-potent drugs, also wonderful.

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Tao Lin's Trip details how the author's experience with LSD, DMT, psilocybin, and more blew his mind while making him more human. Tao Lin's Trip details how the author's experience with LSD, DMT, psilocybin, and more blew his mind while making him more human. Reason.com yes 29:17
Is Rand Paul Right About Special Prosecutors Being Wrong?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/is-rand-paul-right-about-special/ Mon, 10 Dec 2018 19:35:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/10/is-rand-paul-right-about-special/ https://reason.com/podcast/is-rand-paul-right-about-special/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/is-rand-paul-right-about-special/feed/ 36 Also: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez owns the cons while spouting policy B.S. ||| NBC News
NBC News

There are Friday news-dumps and then there are Friday Trump/Russia/Mueller court-filing ka-BOOMs. So on the Monday editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch spend the first half of the show reacting to the latter. Particularly to the controversial contention over the weekend by Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.) that special counsel investigations are essentially "banana republic"-style expeditions to pin a crime on a preset perp.

Also up for discussion: the social media troll game (and ludicrous policy proposals) of Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D–N.Y.), old-media dredging exercises through high schoolers' tweets, and as many Suderman nerd-jokes as can fit comfortably into one hour.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Flying pea v.1' by Daddy_Scrabble is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Prosecutors Recommend Prison for Cohen, Say He Paid off Women on Trump's Behalf," by Scott Shackford

"Rand Paul: Trump/Russia Is 'Overplayed,' and 'Distracting us From Everything Right Now,'" by Matt Welch

"Rand Paul Doesn't Want a Special Prosecutor on Russia," by Mike Riggs

"Putin's Potential Penthouse in Trump Tower Moscow Launches Investigation," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Trump Ex-Lawyer Cohen Pleads Guilty to Lying to Congress About Russian Negotiations," by Scott Shackford

"Ignorance Is Trump's Excuse," by Jacob Sullum

"With an Erroneous Tweet, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Inadvertently Reveals That Medicare-for-All Proponents Still Don't Have a Plan," by Peter Suderman

"Can the Democrats Really Win 2020 with a New Green Deal?" by Ronald Bailey

"Media Attacks Heisman Trophy Winner Kyler Murray for Homophobic Tweets He Sent as a 14-Year-Old," by Robby Soave

"Kevin Hart Quits Oscars Hosting Gig Over Past Homophobic Tweets, Social Media Mobs Win Again," by Robby Soave

"This Is What a Weatherized Economy Looks Like," by Matt Welch

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Also: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez owns the cons while spouting policy B.S. Also: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez owns the cons while spouting policy B.S. Reason.com yes 1:04:45
Beyond Pot Legalization: 21st Century Drug Policy Is about Wellness and Happiness: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/reason-50th-gala-drug-reform-podcast/ Fri, 07 Dec 2018 17:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/07/reason-50th-gala-drug-reform-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/reason-50th-gala-drug-reform-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/reason-50th-gala-drug-reform-podcast/feed/ 9 Jacob Sullum, Dana Rohrabacher, and Adrian Moore talk about the next steps in ending the war on drugs at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Without a doubt, one of the biggest policy wins for Reason since our debut in 1968 has been the legalization of marijuana in the United States. Currently, 10 states and the District of Columbia allow use for recreational purposes and another 33 allow its use as medicine. Donald Trump has even indicated that he'd sign legislation turning control of pot over to the states.

So when Reason celebrated its 50th anniversary in November, we put together a panel devoted to talking about how drug policy has changed over the years, the difficulties in actually implementing legalization, and how drugs the government still considers "illicit"—LSD, MDMA, psilocybin, and more—are now being talked about not simply as ways to get high but as means to increase mental health, happiness, and well-being.

The panelists included:

  • Adrian Moore, Ph.D., who runs the research division of Reason Foundation and consults with cities and states that are implementing marijuana legalization
  • Dana Rohrabacher, a longtime Republican member of Congress who consistently pushed to end the federal war on pot
  • Jacob Sullum, a Reason senior editor who has written about drug policy for years and is the author of Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use

We pick up the conversation, which I moderated, as Adrian Moore begins his comments.

We'll be releasing more panels from our anniversary celebration over the coming weeks. For a discussion of whether the First Amendment is flourishing or fading (featuring the ACLU's Nadine Strossen, the Volokh Conspiracy's Eugene Volokh, and Reason's Stephanie Slade), go here.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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Jacob Sullum, Dana Rohrabacher, and Adrian Moore talk about the next steps in ending the war on drugs at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Jacob Sullum, Dana Rohrabacher, and Adrian Moore talk about the next steps in ending the war on drugs at Reason's 50th anniversary celebration. Reason.com yes 48:22
On Repeal Day, Remember That Prohibition May Be Over, But Its Ripple Effects Are Still Making Drinking Worse: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/repeal-prohibition-dieterle-podcast/ Wed, 05 Dec 2018 19:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/05/repeal-prohibition-dieterle-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/repeal-prohibition-dieterle-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/repeal-prohibition-dieterle-podcast/feed/ 7 Drinks Reform editor Jarrett Dieterle talks about how Prohibition came about, and his new report on America's dumbest booze restrictions. Raise your glass, folks! Today is Repeal Day, which marks the anniversary of the end of federal alcohol prohibition in the United States.

To celebrate the occasion, I interviewed Jarrett Dieterle, a senior fellow at the R Street Institute and the author of a new report on "America's Dumbest Drinking Laws," about how Prohibition came about, what forces were empowered when alcohol was illegal, how alcohol laws changed after repeal, and the many ways in which the effects of Prohibition still linger today.

I'm a fan of cocktails and spirits, and Dieterle is an expert on both the history and current state of alcohol policy in the United States, so naturally the conversation turned to the many ways the two are, and have always been, intertwined.

What was the link between the temperance movement and anti-immigrant sentiments? How did drinks and drinking change during Prohibition? What are some of the bizarre and pointless ways in which states are still making it difficult to buy, mix, and consume alcohol? And—maybe most importantly—what should you be drinking tonight to celebrate Repeal Day?

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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Drinks Reform editor Jarrett Dieterle talks about how Prohibition came about, and his new report on America's dumbest booze restrictions. Drinks Reform editor Jarrett Dieterle talks about how Prohibition came about, and his new report on America's dumbest booze restrictions. Reason.com yes 54:29
Darts and Laurels for the Late George H.W. Bush: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/darts-and-laurels-for-george-h-w-bush/ Mon, 03 Dec 2018 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/12/03/darts-and-laurels-for-george-h-w-bush/ https://reason.com/podcast/darts-and-laurels-for-george-h-w-bush/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/darts-and-laurels-for-george-h-w-bush/feed/ 9 Also: How much should we care that Trump & co. lied in 2016 about a Putin-proximate real estate deal in Russia? Images may appear disproportionate to actual news ||| White House pool photo
White House pool photo

What else can we say about the departed George H.W. Bush, other than that he wasn't the worst president in our lifetimes but otherwise left little for libertarians to cheer about aside from not freaking out while communism collapsed? On the latest editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, Katherine Mangu-Ward and Peter Suderman add their contributions to the pool already populated by co-podcasters Nick Gillespie and me. Hint: involves supermarket scanners.

Also discussed: Last week's huge volume of news on all things Mueller/Trump/Russia, the multi-administration follies of Government Motors, the technologic inadequacies of certain podcast participants, and of course the Reason Webathon (Donate right the hell now!).

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Fishing' by David Szesztay is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"George H.W. Bush, 41st U.S. President, Dead at 94," by Scott Shackford

"When the World Convulsed, George H.W. Bush (Mostly) Let Freedom Happen," by Matt Welch

"George H.W. Bush's Legacy Holds Little, Nothing for Libertarians To Celebrate," by Nick Gillespie

"Did I Really Once Think That George H.W. Bush Was the Worst President of My Lifetime?," by Jesse Walker

"Bush, Buckwheat, and the Budget," by Thomas Winslow Hazlett

"Sovereignty Is Such a Lonely Word," by Matt Welch

"Trump Ex-Lawyer Cohen Pleads Guilty to Lying to Congress About Russian Negotiations," by Scott Shackford

"Putin's Potential Penthouse in Trump Tower Moscow Launches Investigation," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"After Losing $1 Billion to Tariffs, General Motors Announces 14,000 Layoffs," by Eric Boehm

"When Trump (or Obama) Threatens CEOs, It's the Little Guy Who Loses," by Matt Welch

"How The Hell Did GM Pay Back Its Bailout "in Full And Ahead of Schedule"? Well, It Didn't…," by Nick Gillespie

"GM Will Shut Down Factory Built on Land Seized in Controversial 1981 Poletown Taking," by Ilya Somin

"Trump, Ryan, and Walker Want to Seize Wisconsin Homes to Build a Foxconn Plant," by Zach Weismueller

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Also: How much should we care that Trump & co. lied in 2016 about a Putin-proximate real estate deal in Russia? Also: How much should we care that Trump & co. lied in 2016 about a Putin-proximate real estate deal in Russia? Reason.com yes 1:01:58
Has Anti-Racism Become as Harmful as Racism? John McWhorter vs. Nikhil Singh https://reason.com/podcast/anti-racism-soho-debate/ Fri, 30 Nov 2018 17:20:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/30/anti-racism-soho-debate/ https://reason.com/podcast/anti-racism-soho-debate/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/anti-racism-soho-debate/feed/ 72 Watch the Oxford-style debate hosted by the Soho Forum. Has the message of anti-racism become as harmful a force in American life as racism itself?

That was the resolution at a public debate hosted by the Soho Forum on November 14, 2018. It featured John McWhorter, associate professor of English at Columbia University, and Nikhil Singh, professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University. Soho Forum Director Gene Epstein moderated.

It was an Oxford-style debate in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious. In a close finish, Singh, arguing the negative, prevailed by convincing nearly 13 percent of audience members to come over to his side.

Singh is the author of Race and America's Long War (University of California Press, 2017), and Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy (Harvard University Press, 2004).

McWhorter, who is a regular columnist for Time and CNN, is the author most recently of Talking Back, Talking Black: Truths About America's Lingua Franca (2017)

Comedian Dave Smith, host of the podcast Part of the Problem, opened the program.

The Soho Forum, which is partnered with the Reason Foundation, is a monthly debate series at the SubCulture Theater in Manhattan's East Village. On Monday, December 3, economists Kenneth Rogoff and Lawrence H. White will debate whether governments should phase out cash. Get your tickets here.

Edited by Todd Krainin.

Music: "Voyeur," by Jingle Punks.

Photo Credit: Brett Raney.

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Watch the Oxford-style debate hosted by the Soho Forum. Watch the Oxford-style debate hosted by the Soho Forum. Reason.com yes 1:48:14
Live Webathon Edition of the Reason Podcast! https://reason.com/podcast/be-here-at-1-pm-et-to-watch-a-live-podca/ Wed, 28 Nov 2018 18:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/28/be-here-at-1-pm-et-to-watch-a-live-podca/ https://reason.com/podcast/be-here-at-1-pm-et-to-watch-a-live-podca/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/be-here-at-1-pm-et-to-watch-a-live-podca/feed/ 51 Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch take your questions.

(Trouble viewing video? Try: Facebook or YouTube)

Join Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch for a live webathon edition of the Reason Podcast. Post your questions in the comments here at Reason.com, YouTube, or at Facebook—we'll answer as many as we can during the show.

Donate Now!

Do you want to know what Reason's top editors really think about U.S. foreign policy, the national debt, net neutrality, Donald Trump, and personal drug use? Then this is your time, kind readers. Put questions in the comments here. The show will also be livestreamed at Reason's Facebook page and YouTube channel.

We did this last year with Matt, Katherine, and Nick, and it was a good time, filled with insight, laughter…and just the right tinge of bitterness. With Peter joining us, it will better still.

So tune in. And remember, this is Reason's annual webathon week, when we ask readers to support our efforts to bring you news, politics, culture, and ideas from a uniquely libertarian perspective. The world is in many, even most ways an infinitely better place than when Reason debuted in 1968, but we've all got miles to go before we sleep when it comes to creating a freer, fairer, and more fun world. Your tax-deductible contributions entitle you to some great swag (see below) but, more important, will help us to keep being your voice in fights over "Free Minds and Free Markets."

$50: a Reason bumper sticker

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$1,000: all of the above PLUS a private lunch in Washington, DC with a Reason editor and an invitation to Reason Weekend 2019 in Phoenix, Arizona.

$5,000 all of the above PLUS 1 ticket to Reason Weekend for first-time attendees.

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'Hard Boiled' by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under CC BY 3.0

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Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch take your questions. Nick Gillespie, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch take your questions. Reason.com yes 1:31:29
Adam Conover of Adam Ruins Everything on Seeking Truth in the Post-Truth Era https://reason.com/podcast/adam-ruins-everythings-conover-truth/ Mon, 26 Nov 2018 22:00:00 +0000 https://reason.com/2018/11/26/adam-ruins-everythings-conover-truth/ https://reason.com/podcast/adam-ruins-everythings-conover-truth/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/adam-ruins-everythings-conover-truth/feed/ 45 The host of TruTV's hit show has lost some faith in the power of rational discourse. And he has some ideas for how to fix the problem. Since 2015, when Reason first sat down with Adam Conover, host of TruTV's hit show Adam Ruins Everything, a new president has taken office, a new media landscape has emerged, and some would say we're inhabiting a new reality.

What's it like to make a show that seeks to uncover hidden truths in the "post-truth era"?

"I guess what's happened is that I've a little bit let go of the idea that we can reach everybody," says Conover, who's about to go on a live tour and is gearing up for the premiere of his show's third season. "Certain people…the informational world they live in, it's so distorted that it's hard to get through."

But most people still have a "deep down desire to learn, to know the truth," he says.

In a wide-ranging interview with Reason's Zach Weissmueller (full disclosure: Weissmueller is married to the show's casting director), Conover shares his thoughts on the "response videos" to his work proliferating on YouTube, how he contends with the psychological defense mechanisms that prevent viewers from changing their opinions, the "de-platforming" of conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, and how big tech companies are changing our perceptions of reality.

The new season of Adam Ruins Everything premieres on November 27, 2018.

Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Camera by Paul Detrick, Justin Monticello, and Alexis Garcia.

"Happy Whistle" by Scott Holmes is licensed under an Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
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The host of TruTV's hit show has lost some faith in the power of rational discourse. And he has some ideas for how to fix the problem. The host of TruTV's hit show has lost some faith in the power of rational discourse. And he has some ideas for how to fix the problem. Reason.com yes 35:05
Does Trump Have a Point About Asylum?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/does-trump-have-a-point-about-asylum/ Mon, 26 Nov 2018 21:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/26/does-trump-have-a-point-about-asylum/ https://reason.com/podcast/does-trump-have-a-point-about-asylum/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/does-trump-have-a-point-about-asylum/feed/ 11 <em>Reason</em> editors check their premises on immigration. ||| Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press/Newscom
Carol Guzy/ZUMA Press/Newscom

(Republican) president from 1981 to 1989, during a 1980 debate: "Open the borders both ways."

(Republican) president from 2017 to the present, this morning: "We will close the Border permanently if need be."

Latest Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition: Let's talk about all this and more!

Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman and Matt Welch today tackle some of the thorniest questions in our country's never-ending immigration debate: Does President Donald Trump have a point about the 1,700 percent jump in asylum seekers? Does Hillary Clinton have a point about the left abetting the populist right through failures of both policy and engagement? Do high immigration levels lead to the very degradation of social trust that certain people (cough, cough) keep yammering on about?

Along the way we also discuss balloon murder, Steven Pinker's hair, and our own insufferable Thanksgiving political conversations.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Hide the Horror' by Asthmatic Astronaut is licensed under CC BY NC SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"'We Will Close the Border Permanently If Need Be,'" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Trump's Border Lawlessness," by Shikha Dalmia

"Donald Trump Fails to Confront the Truth About the Migrant Caravan," by Shikha Dalmia

"Why the Obsession with the Migrant Caravan, Mr. President?" by Nick Gillespie

"The Factual and Rhetorical Silliness of Family Separation Whataboutism," by Matt Welch

"Republicans vs. Reagan," by Matt Welch

"Ideology Is Out, Identity Is In," by Nick Gillespie

"Steven Pinker Loves the Enlightenment," by Nick Gillespie

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Reason editors check their premises on immigration. Reason editors check their premises on immigration. Reason.com yes 1:05:48
Is the First Amendment Flourishing or Floundering in the 21st Century?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/50th-gala-panel-first-amendment-podcast/ Fri, 23 Nov 2018 14:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/23/50th-gala-panel-first-amendment-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/50th-gala-panel-first-amendment-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/50th-gala-panel-first-amendment-podcast/feed/ 8 Nadine Strossen, Eugene Volokh, and Stephanie Slade discuss freedom of speech, assembly, and religion at <em>Reason</em>'s 50th anniversary. A few weeks ago in Los Angeles, Reason celebrated its 50th anniversary. To mark that milestone, we hosted a series of discussions taking the measure of how far the world has come since 1968 in relation to a bunch of topics that we've long been interested in. I'm happy to share with you a panel titled "The First Amendment in the 21st Century."

Arguably, nothing is more fundamental to Reason's commitment to a libertarian world of "Free Minds and Free Markets" than the rights guaranteed by the First Amendment: freedom of speech, assembly, religion, and redress. Yet today's world seems to be filled with paradoxes when it comes the First Amendment: Thanks to technology and the breakdown of gatekeeper institutions, we're freer than ever to say what we want, yet expression everywhere seems haunted or blocked by hate-speech laws and formal and informal codes. Recent attempts by different levels of government to force businesses to provide birth control or wedding cakes in ways that run counter to the faith of owners have been rebuffed, but in the narrowest of terms. Is the First Amendment flourishing or floundering?

What follows is a wide-ranging and freewheeling conversation about all that and more, featuring a slugger's row of participants and moderated by me. The participants included:

We'll be releasing more podcasts from Reason's 50th anniversary over the coming weeks.

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Nadine Strossen, Eugene Volokh, and Stephanie Slade discuss freedom of speech, assembly, and religion at Reason's 50th anniversary. Nadine Strossen, Eugene Volokh, and Stephanie Slade discuss freedom of speech, assembly, and religion at Reason's 50th anniversary. Reason.com yes 44:39
That Time Ayn Rand Threatened Reason with Legal Action: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/manny-klausner-podcast/ Wed, 21 Nov 2018 18:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/21/manny-klausner-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/manny-klausner-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/manny-klausner-podcast/feed/ 132 One of <em>Reason</em>'s founding editors, attorney Manny Klausner, tells tales from the early days of the magazine of "Free Minds and Free Markets."

Reason

Can you imagine a lawsuit called Rand v. Reason, pitting the author of The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged against the nation's only magazine of "Free Minds and Free Markets"? Well, it almost happened in the 1970s.

In the latest Reason Podcast, one of our founding editors, Manny Klausner, tells me that tale, along with many stories of the early days of Reason and the libertarian movement. Attending New York University law school in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Klausner studied with Ludwig von Mises, represented the libertarian wing of the fledgling Conservative Party, and came under the influence of firebrand economist Murray Rothbard as well. While working at Reason, Klausner (archive here) produced memorable interviews with the likes of Pentagon Papers leaker Daniel Ellsberg, economist Thomas Sowell, '70s self-help guru Robert Ringer, and future President Ronald Reagan.

Founded in 1968 by Lanny Friedlander (1947–2011), Reason is celebrating its 50th anniversary by hosting a series of in-depth conversations with past editors about how the magazine has changed since its founding, what we've gotten right and wrong over the years, and what the future holds for believers in "free minds and free markets." Go here to listen to interviews with Robert W. Poole, Marty Zupan, Virginia Postrel, Matt Welch, Katherine Mangu-Ward, and me about the life and times of Reason.

Along with Poole and Tibor Machan (1939-2016), Klausner was one of the principals of Reason Enterprises, which bought the magazine from the Friedlander in 1971. He was also a co-founder of the nonprofit Reason Foundation, established in 1978, which continues to publish this website and podcast. As an attorney, Klausner participated in Bush v. Gore, the case that settled the 2000 election, and successfully defended Matt Drudge in a defamation suit brought by Clinton adviser Sidney Blumenthal. He's been active in the Federalist Society and has served as general counsel to the Individual Rights Foundation.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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One of Reason's founding editors, attorney Manny Klausner, tells tales from the early days of the magazine of "Free Minds and Free Markets." One of Reason's founding editors, attorney Manny Klausner, tells tales from the early days of the magazine of "Free Minds and Free Markets." Reason.com yes 1:03:51
Is Trump vs. Acosta the Iran-Iraq War of 2018?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/is-trump-vs-acosta-the-iran-iraq/ Mon, 19 Nov 2018 20:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/19/is-trump-vs-acosta-the-iran-iraq/ https://reason.com/podcast/is-trump-vs-acosta-the-iran-iraq/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/is-trump-vs-acosta-the-iran-iraq/feed/ 19 Assessing the import of presidential tantrums, media hyperbole, military complaints, and the near-arrival of federal sentencing reform ||| Ron Sachs - CNP / MEGA / Newscom
Ron Sachs—CNP / MEGA / Newscom

Beloved Reason Editor-in-Everything Katherine Mangu-Ward had a piece in this weekend's New York Times headlined "Trump and Acosta: When Showboats Collide." Given the nonstop borgledy-fraggle of news within the Trump vs. media vs. Trump Möbius strip of blather, we start the latest editors roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast with an extended rumination on the meta-meanings (and lack thereof) of this eternally recurrent combat.

Other topics of note discussed by Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and yours truly include the president's prickly relationship with the military, his sometimes-coherent foreign policy doctrine, the off-again/on-again FIRST STEP Act, plus (for some reason) bidets, Rand Paul prospectively barfing on Mitch McConnell's desk, and whether ladies who dye their hair blue and purple are basically poisonous tree frogs.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Superator' by Pietnastka is licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Federal Judge Rules Trump White House Must Return Jim Acosta's Press Pass," by Joe Setyon

"Reporters Become Participants in Tribal Political Warfare," by J.D. Tuccille

"Bob Woodward Is Right: The Press Is 'Emotionally Unhinged' About Trump," by Nick Gillespie

"The Sorry State of FOIA," by C.J. Ciaramella

"Richard Nixon Probably Would Not Have Been Saved by Fox News," by Matt Welch

"The Military Is 'Securing' a 1,900-Mile Border with 22 Miles of Razor Wire," by Eric Boehm

"First Full Year of Trump-Run Foreign Policy Sees Record Number of Bombs Dropped on Afghanistan," by Brian Doherty

"Mitch McConnell Touts Wild Spending Bills as 'Bipartisan' Accomplishments," by Joe Setyon

"Donald Trump Appears Clueless About the Criminal Justice Reform He Says He Supports," by Eric Boehm

"Hey, Libertarians! The Criminal Justice Reform Movement Sees You Out There," by Scott Shackford

"Trump Endorses Criminal Justice Bill, Giving Momentum to Long-Delayed Reforms," by C.J. Ciaramella

"Top National Police Organization Declares Support for Modest Federal Sentencing Reforms," by Scott Shackford

"ABC Makes Patently False Claim About New Title IX Rules," by Robby Soave

"Sole and Despotic Dominion," by Cory Doctorow

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Assessing the import of presidential tantrums, media hyperbole, military complaints, and the near-arrival of federal sentencing reform Assessing the import of presidential tantrums, media hyperbole, military complaints, and the near-arrival of federal sentencing reform Reason.com yes 55:14
Should Facebook and Twitter Censor Themselves? A Debate. https://reason.com/podcast/social-media-censorship-soho/ Fri, 16 Nov 2018 15:02:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/16/social-media-censorship-soho/ https://reason.com/podcast/social-media-censorship-soho/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/social-media-censorship-soho/feed/ 35 What should the culture of free speech, free expression, and ownership look like on our social media platforms? Should social media platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube only remove users who make true threats or incite violence? Or do they have an ethical obligation to hold their users to a higher standard?

That was the topic of a recent public debate hosted by Reasona West Coast version of the popular New York City-based debate series, The Soho Forum—pitting Thaddeus Russell, author of A Renegade History of the United States and host of the Unregistered podcast, against Ken White, an attorney at Brown, White & Osborn, author at the legal blog Popehat, and co-host of the podcast All the President's Lawyers.

Russell argued that corporations that accept tax breaks and public subsidies should be more accountable to the public. White held that social media sites deserve the same set of speech rights and limitations as ordinary citizens.

Both speakers agreed with the broader libertarian point that private websites have the legal right to do what they want. The debate hinged on a broader point: What should the culture of free speech, free expression, and ownership look like on our social media platforms?

It was an Oxford-style debate, in which the audience votes on the resolution before and after the event, and the side that picks up the most votes wins. White won the debate by picking up 20 percent of the votes.

The debate was held on November 1, 2018, at Reason's Los Angeles studio.

Edited by Ian Keyser. Recording by Meredith Bragg, Paul Detrick, and Zach Weissmueller.

'Machinery' by Kai Engel is licenced under CC BY-NC 4.0

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What should the culture of free speech, free expression, and ownership look like on our social media platforms? What should the culture of free speech, free expression, and ownership look like on our social media platforms? Reason.com yes 1:26:07
Airbnb Made D.C. Affordable for Tourists. The City Council Just Voted to Rein It In. https://reason.com/podcast/dc-just-killed-airbnb/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 23:04:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/14/dc-just-killed-airbnb/ https://reason.com/podcast/dc-just-killed-airbnb/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/dc-just-killed-airbnb/feed/ 24 Hosts will be required to get a license, report their activities, and only rent properties where they reside. Lara Hawketts and her husband, Alex Fuentes-Gonzales, live with their kids in a two-story house in the Forest Hills neighborhood of Washington, D.C. In 2009, Hawketts lost her job working for a British consulting firm. Looking for ways to pick up extra income, Hawketts discovered that she could host short-term guests for a modest fee through a new service called Airbnb.

"They would stay in our basement," Hawketts says. "One person will be on the sofa or two people would be in the queen bed. We'd have a pullout couch and a day bed and the whole family would just squish up and they didn't care."

When Hawketts' friends and neighbors took an interest in Airbnb but shied away from all the work involved, she saw a business opportunity. Along with her husband, she started Home Sweet City, a business managing Airbnb rentals for other hosts. Today they oversee more than 60 properties.

"We just hear these amazing stories of folks that would come to the city, save for sometimes their entire lives, bring their family and it would be their one trip of a lifetime to D.C.," Hawketts says. "There was no way they could afford to stay in a hotel."

Today, a mid-scale hotel room in Washington D.C. runs on average $237 per night. For the about the same price you can rent this centrally located four-bedroom historic townhouse, or for $110 this modern basement apartment near Capitol Hill. Or, for travelers on a budget, there's this twin bed in a shared room near Dulles airport for $16.

On November 13, with the support of the hotel Worker's Union and the hotel industry's trade group, the D.C. City Council passed a bill that could have a devastating impact on the district's short-term rental market.

Airbnb hosts can no longer rent out properties in which they don't reside. Those renting out their own spare rooms and couches will be required to obtain a license, report their activities to the city on a monthly basis, and be present during a stay, with the exception of up to 90 days a year.

City Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) says the intent of the bill is to eliminate competition from Airbnb rentals, and make it cheaper for permanent residents to live in Washington, D.C.

"We limit the short-term rentals to a person's primary residence and prohibited to a second or third property," Mendelson says. "We think that that correlates to improving the housing supply in terms of affordability."

But there's a danger this new bill could unintentionally wipe out the Airbnb market all together.

"D.C.'s current zoning actually prohibits short-term housing in most zones, including home sharing," says Tracy Loh, a data scientist at George Washington University. Loh points out that even though most Airbnb rentals are already illegal, the city has never enforced the zoning code. This new law could change that.

"If the city gets involved in regulating Airbnb and requires the platform to register, get a permit, and share data, then they will know where Airbnb activity is happening in the city," Loh says. "That means that they'll know where there are code violations."

Hawketts says that if the zoning regulations are enforced, it would be disasterous for her family. "The fact that we rent our basement so frequently, it pays two-thirds of our mortgage"

Prior to the vote, Mendelson said all 13 memebers of the City Council sent a letter to the Zoning Commission. No changes were made to the regulations, but the Council passed it anyway.

"Some of our owners have actually just said, 'Whoa,' you know, the ones that are a little bit, nervous of the situation and want to plan ahead."" Hawketts says. "They said, "okay, we're gonna stop this and we're going to get a long-term tenant,"

"Some are completely the opposite: 'I'm going to do this, whether they try and stop me or not…I'm just going to take the risk and run with it.'"

Mendelson says that Airbnb hosts should embrace the new law because—assuming the zoning code changes— it provides a legal pathway for them to operate.

"You know we created a company out of necessity and out of sheer determination and blood, sweat and tears," Hawketts says. "We built it from nothing in a new market.

"Someone's pulling the rug out from under our feet and that that to me is, it's really sad. Just doesn't seem fair or just."

Produced by Mark McDaniel. Cameras by Todd Krainin and McDaniel.

Tar and Spackle by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0

Dance by Monplasir is licensed under CC BY 4.0

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Hosts will be required to get a license, report their activities, and only rent properties where they reside. Hosts will be required to get a license, report their activities, and only rent properties where they reside. Reason.com yes
Libertarian Filmmaker, Podcaster Kmele Foster Wants To Change the World: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/kmele-foster-podcast/ Wed, 14 Nov 2018 15:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/14/kmele-foster-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/kmele-foster-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/kmele-foster-podcast/feed/ 21 So far, the world is kind of listening. Q&A with the co-host of The Fifth Column and co-founder of Freethink Media.
Kmele Foster, Facebook

In 2004, Michael Bell's 21-year-old son was killed by police during a routine traffic stop in Kenosha, Wisconsin. Within three days, local law enforcement declared it had fully investigated the matter and announced that police had acted properly throughout. Pushing through his grief, Bell also pushed for change, beginning a decade-long campaign to legally mandate truly independent investigations into deadly use of force by police. He succeeded in Wisconsin and, to date, seven other states to pass such legislation.

Bell's crusade is the subject of a recent video by today's podcast subject, Kmele Foster of Freethink Media, an online video platform founded in 2011 to tell stories about human perseverance, inspiration, and progress. Foster is also the former co-host, with Kennedy and Reason's own Matt Welch, of the Fox Business show The Independents, and a current co-host of the popular podcast The Fifth Column, a free-wheeling, boozy deep-read of news and popular culture.

Foster was born in 1980 and raised in the Washington, D.C. area. I talk with him about how the Michael Bell story exemplifies what Freethink Media is trying to accomplish, what it was like growing up in an immigrant household (his mother is Jamaican), why libertarianism is underrepresented among racial and ethnic minorities, how he came to his anarcho-capitalist beliefs, and what his hopes are for his 1-year-old daughter.

CORRECTION: The original text implied that I was born in 1980. Foster was born that year. I was born in 1963.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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So far, the world is kind of listening. Q&A with the co-host of The Fifth Column and co-founder of Freethink Media. So far, the world is kind of listening. Q&A with the co-host of The Fifth Column and co-founder of Freethink Media. Reason.com yes 46:40
We Are So Unprepared for the Coming Budgepocalypse: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/we-are-so-unprepared-for-the-coming/ Mon, 12 Nov 2018 19:35:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/12/we-are-so-unprepared-for-the-coming/ https://reason.com/podcast/we-are-so-unprepared-for-the-coming/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/we-are-so-unprepared-for-the-coming/feed/ 9 You have come to the right place for CBO death porn. Those terrifying fingers coming soon to a throat near you ||| Reason
Reason

One of the best things about divided federal government, Nick Gillespie reminds us on the new editors' roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, is that at least it's not unified. Which is to say, there's less chance of unfunded entitlement expansions, big new overseas military commitments, and all the debt/deficit that they bring.

Fellow podcasters Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and yours truly weigh in with dramatic Congressional Budget Office readings, tales from post–World War II governance, and grim assessments of almost all politicians who hold elected office. Also debated: voter fraud fantasia, President Donald Trump's reading comprehension issues, and this delightful Isaac Asimov roundtable discussion from the 1970s.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Fifteen Street' by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"House Democrats Plan to Use Their New Majority to Target Trump. Let's Hope It Keeps Them Too Busy to Legislate," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"With Midterms Done, Are We Going To Get Serious About Policy or Continue the Clown Show?" by Nick Gillespie

"When the Bubble Bursts, We're So Screwed," by Matt Welch

"Trillion-Dollar Deficits Are Nearly Here. Thanks, Republicans!" by Peter Suderman

"Failed States," by Michael Flynn and Adam B. Summers

"It Can Happen Here," by Arnold Kling, David Henderson, and Maurice McTigue

"The 19 Percent Solution," by Nick Gillespie and Veronique de Rugy

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You have come to the right place for CBO death porn. You have come to the right place for CBO death porn. Reason.com yes 1:01:04
Why Can't Psychedelics (and Other Drugs) Just Be for Fun?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/jacob-sullum-psychedelics-podcast/ Fri, 09 Nov 2018 20:20:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/09/jacob-sullum-psychedelics-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/jacob-sullum-psychedelics-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/jacob-sullum-psychedelics-podcast/feed/ 68 LSD, psilocybin, and other hallucinogenics are gaining new acceptance as serious medicine. But what if you want to do them just for <em>fun</em>, asks Jacob Sullum.
Reason

In a career spanning 30 years, Reason Senior Editor Jacob Sullum has been one of the most insistent voices in favor of "pharmacological freedom," the right of individuals to use whatever substances they want to control, modulate, and change their mind, emotions, and moods. In the latest issue of Reason, Sullum reviews Michael Pollan's popular new book on psychedelic drugs and boldly asks the question, "Who Controls Your Cortex?" The answer, he says, is the individual.

In a wide-ranging and personal conversation, I talk with Sullum about the immense changes in drug policy over the past quarter-century, why the marijuana legalization movement has succeeded, and what the future holds for less-popular and more-potent substances such as MDMA (ecstasy) and psilocybin as they gain various forms of government approval as "legitimate" medicines. We talk frankly about our own experiences and how, as parents, we talk about legal and illegal drug use with our children. Sullum is the author of 1998's For Your Own Good, a history of the anti-smoking movement, and 2004's Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use.

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LSD, psilocybin, and other hallucinogenics are gaining new acceptance as serious medicine. But what if you want to do them just for fun, asks Jacob Sullum. LSD, psilocybin, and other hallucinogenics are gaining new acceptance as serious medicine. But what if you want to do them just for fun, asks Jacob Sullum. Reason.com yes 56:55
Will There Ever Be a Morning After the Midterms?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/2018-midterm-roundtable-podcast/ Thu, 08 Nov 2018 20:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/08/2018-midterm-roundtable-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/2018-midterm-roundtable-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/2018-midterm-roundtable-podcast/feed/ 7 Before the news cycle spins forever into crazy-land, Reason editors pause to assess the deep meanings, and lack thereof, of this week's elections Mangu not pictured ||| Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.

Political attention has already migrated to Acostagate, the sacking of Jeff Sessions, and that insane press conference from yesterday, but there was an actual election of some note on Tuesday, and much to talk about from a libertarian perspective. So we convened an irregular assembly of the Reason Podcast, editors' roundtable edition, to deliver some preliminary findings.

Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, Peter Suderman, and Matt Welch debate the permanent hysteria of presidential politics, the electoral role and legislative future of health care policy, third-party sadnesses, and some happy news peeking through the usual woe.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"A Surprisingly Normal Election," by Peter Suderman

"Three Cheers for the Return of Divided Government," by Eric Boehm

"2018 Midterm Election Results Include a Lot for Libertarians to Like," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"After the Midterms, Trumpism Is the Dominant Force in the GOP," by Eric Boehm

"Florida Approves Ballot Amendment to Restore Voting Rights of 1.4 Million People With Felony Records," by C.J. Ciaramella

"Justin Amash and Thomas Massie, Two of the Most Libertarian Members of Congress, Re-Elected," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Bigfoot Erotica Aficionado Denver Riggleman Beat Olivia Wilde's Mom in Virginia Congressional Race," by Eric Boehm

"Michigan Becomes the 10th State to Legalize Recreational Marijuana," by Jacob Sullum

"Ex-Nevada Brothel Owner Dennis Hof Wins Assembly Seat Despite Being Dead," by Joe Setyon

"Clint Bolick, Arizona's Libertarian Supreme Court Justice, Wins Judicial Retention Election" by Damon Root

"Harsh Republican Restrictionism Loses Bigly in the Midterms," by Shikha Dalmia

"Jeff Sessions Is Out, 2020 Speculation Is In," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Jeff Sessions Was a Terrible Attorney General. His Successor Will Do More of the Same.," by Scott Shackford

"CNN's Jim Acosta Was Rude, but He Did Not Assault a White House Intern," by Robby Soave

"Threatening Cable News Hosts Doesn't Help Anyone," by Joe Setyon

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Before the news cycle spins forever into crazy-land, Reason editors pause to assess the deep meanings, and lack thereof, of this week's elections Before the news cycle spins forever into crazy-land, Reason editors pause to assess the deep meanings, and lack thereof, of this week's elections Reason.com yes 48:25
How Much Don't We Know About the Midterms?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/how-much-dont-we-know-about/ Mon, 05 Nov 2018 20:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/11/05/how-much-dont-we-know-about/ https://reason.com/podcast/how-much-dont-we-know-about/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/how-much-dont-we-know-about/feed/ 90 Polling uncertainty and a surge in voter enthusiasm could make tomorrow an embarrassing day for many in the political class. #ItBegins ||| Texas Secretary of State
Texas Secretary of State

Are you ready for the next 30 hours or so of political hysteria, spoiler-hunting, and supremely confident innumeracy? Then you're in the right place! Today's editor-roundtable midterms-preview edition of the Reason Podcast includes, thank Jeebus, Managing Editor Stephanie Slade, who has forgotten more about polling than most of us will ever know. Slade leads us in walking through the numbers and potential meanings of massive early-voting turnout, shaky state-level polls, and the built-in uncertainty of (justifiably!) basing this year's election forecasts on last cycle's voter behavior. It's unknowable out there, kids, so don't fall for early exit polls.

The usual crew of Katherine Mangu-Ward, Nick Gillespie, and yours truly also pick out races of note, discuss the implications of President Donald Trump's hard pivot to caravan/immigration politics in the homestretch, talk smack about Daylight Saving Time, and in open defiance of Slade make a series of probably disastrous predictions for Election Day.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Three Stories' by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under CC BY-NC 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Tomorrow Is the Most Important Election of Our Lifetime. Don't Let Trump Denialists Tell You Otherwise," by Shikha Dalmia

"This Isn't the Most Important Election of Your Lifetime. Not Even Close," by David Harsanyi

"The Most Important Election of Our Lives?" by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"It's OK Not to Vote," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Control of the Senate Could Depend on These 10 Races," by Joe Setyon

"10 House Races Libertarians Should Watch on Election Night," by Eric Boehm & Zuri Davis

"Donald Trump Fails to Confront the Truth About the Migrant Caravan," by Shikha Dalmia

"Trump's Executive Order Ending Birthright Citizenship Is All About the Midterms," by Eric Boehm

"Republicans Whip Up Pre-Midterm Fears With Lies About Invading Migrant Caravan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"How Third Parties Are Getting Screwed This Election Season," by Matt Welch & Alexis Garcia

"Indiana Democrats Encourage Conservatives to Vote for Libertarian Lucy Brenton for Senate," by Matt Welch

"4 More States Could Legalize Medical or Recreational Marijuana Next Week," by Jacob Sullum

"Let Daylight Saving Time Die Already," by Zuri Davis

"Why We Have Daylight Saving Time and Why We Should Scrap It," by Andrew Heaton

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Polling uncertainty and a surge in voter enthusiasm could make tomorrow an embarrassing day for many in the political class. Polling uncertainty and a surge in voter enthusiasm could make tomorrow an embarrassing day for many in the political class. Reason.com yes 57:20
How Blockchain Can Build Trust—and Reduce Government's Power: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/alex-winter-podcast/ Wed, 31 Oct 2018 18:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/31/alex-winter-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/alex-winter-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/alex-winter-podcast/feed/ 2 Q&A with Alex Winter, whose new documentary, Trust Machine, explores the radical potential of blockchain to decentralize just about everything. Blockchain, the decentralized, incorruptible ledger system that undergirds bitcoin, "gives you an actual power to affect change in the world," says hacker Lauri Love. "It's gonna scare the shit out of some very powerful people."

Love is one of the people featured in actor and filmmaker Alex Winter's new documentary, Trust Machine, which explains how blockchain works and how businesses are using it to reinvent power grids, music distribution, and even grocery stores. For today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Winter, whose previous documentaries include Downloaded, which looked at how Napster and other file-sharing services disrupted the music industry, and Deep Web, a sympathetic portrait of Silk Road and similar websites, about the potential for blockchain to change how governments—and corporations—go about their business.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

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Q&A with Alex Winter, whose new documentary, Trust Machine, explores the radical potential of blockchain to decentralize just about everything. Q&A with Alex Winter, whose new documentary, Trust Machine, explores the radical potential of blockchain to decentralize just about everything. Reason.com yes 43:26
Are We in a New Era of Political Violence?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/are-we-in-a-new-era-of-political/ Mon, 29 Oct 2018 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/29/are-we-in-a-new-era-of-political/ https://reason.com/podcast/are-we-in-a-new-era-of-political/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/are-we-in-a-new-era-of-political/feed/ 39 Are we all just living through Elon Musk's dystopian simulation?

||| SOCIAL MEDIA/REUTERS/Newscom
SOCIAL MEDIA/REUTERS/Newscom

One week ago, the editor-roundtable version of the Reason Podcast included some robust discussion about whether we are indeed living through an ominous time of heightening political violence. Since then, we've had the killing of two black people in Kentucky by a white man alleged to have tried first targeting a black church, then the arrest of a #MAGA-memer in the sending of (unexploded) pipe-bombs to a dozen or so leading Democrats, and then this weekend's anti-Semitic murder rampage in a Pittsburgh synagogue by an alleged anti-immigrant social-media nut.

So Reason editors Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and Matt Welch pick up the conversation where it left off, trying to see whether we've turned a dark new corner, what can be said about President Donald Trump's predictably awful response, how Gab's role fits into our pre-existing anxieties about social media and the culture of free speech, and—obviously—whether we'd be better off being self-aware about living through Elon Musk's drug-induced simulation.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

Relevant links from the show:

"11 Dead in Mass Shooting at Pittsburgh Synagogue," by Eric Boehm

"Has There Been a Surge of Anti-Semitism Under and Because of Trump?" by David E. Bernstein

"Gab Dumped by Tech Companies Over Synagogue Shooter Posts but Twitter, Facebook, and Other Social-Media Giants Get a Pass," by Elizabeth Noland Brown

"Trump's Rhetoric Is Divisive, Contemptible, Un-Presidential. It's Also Not Responsible for the Synagogue Shooting," by Nick Gillespie

"Suspect Arrested in Attempted Mail Bombings," by Joe Setyon

"Mail Bomber Cesar Sayoc Threatened Me on Facebook," by Ilya Somin

"Trump's Anti-Press Rhetoric Is Irresponsible, Even If the Bomber Is Just a Crazy Person," by Robby Soave

"Migrant Caravan Hysteria Returns," by Joe Setyon

"Republicans Whip Up Pre-Midterm Fears With Lies About Invading Migrant Caravan," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Why the Obsession with the Migrant Caravan, Mr. President?" by Nick Gillespie

"Do Partisans Hate Each Other More Than Ever?" by Morris Fiorina

"No, We're Not on the Brink of Civil War. But the Reasons Why We're Not Are Far From Entirely Reassuring." by Ilya Somin

"When Social Media Platforms Block Conservatives," by John Stossel

"Facebook Slams Independent Voices With Latest Political Purge," by J.D. Tuccille

"Live Debate in LA on 11/1: Ken White of Popehat, Thaddeus Russell of Renegade U," by Nick Gillespie

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Are we all just living through Elon Musk's dystopian simulation? Are we all just living through Elon Musk's dystopian simulation? Reason.com yes 57:53
Socialism vs. Capitalism: Jacobin's Bhaskar Sunkara and Economist Gene Epstein Debate https://reason.com/podcast/socialism-capitalism-bhaskar-sunkara/ Thu, 25 Oct 2018 16:36:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/25/socialism-capitalism-bhaskar-sunkara/ https://reason.com/podcast/socialism-capitalism-bhaskar-sunkara/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/socialism-capitalism-bhaskar-sunkara/feed/ 56 Which economic system is most effective at bringing freedom to the masses? Is socialism more effective than capitalism in bringing freedom to the masses?

That was the resolution at a recent public debated hosted by the Soho Forum on October 15, 2018. It featured Bhaskar Sunkara, the founding editor and publisher of Jacobin magazine, and Gene Epstein, the Soho Forum's director and former economics and books editor of Barron's. Naomi Brockwell moderated.

It was an Oxford-style debate in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious. Epstein, arguing the negative, prevailed by convincing about 11 percent of audience members to change their minds.

Sunkara is also the author of the forthcoming The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality, which will be published by Basic Books in 2019.

Comedian Dave Smith, host of the podcast Part of the Problem, opened the program.

The Soho Forum, which is partnered with the Reason Foundation, is a monthly debate series at the SubCulture Theater in Manhattan's East Village. At the next debate, which will be held on November 14, 2018, Columbia professor John McWhorter will debate NYU's Nikhil Pal Singh on whether "the message of anti-racism has become as harmful a force in American life as racism itself." Buy tickets here.

Music: "January" by Kai Engle is licensed under a CC-BY creative commons license.

All Soho Forums are turned into Reason videos and podcasts. Go here for a full archive.

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Which economic system is most effective at bringing freedom to the masses? Which economic system is most effective at bringing freedom to the masses? Reason.com yes 1:45:36
Tyler Cowen's Stubborn Attachments To Freedom and Prosperity: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/tyler-cowen-podcast/ Wed, 24 Oct 2018 16:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/24/tyler-cowen-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/tyler-cowen-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/tyler-cowen-podcast/feed/ 16 The prolific George Mason University economist outlines his unabashedly libertarian argument for a government that does less and individuals who do more. Over the past 20 years, arguably no libertarian thinker has cut a broader or deeper swath than Tyler Cowen, who holds the Holbert L. Harris Chair in economics at George Mason University and acts as chairman and general director of the Mercatus Center. Co-founder of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution, the 56-year-old New Jersey native is a regular contributor at Bloomberg and for years wrote an "economic scene" column for The New York Times. He is the host of Conversations with Tyler, a podcast series that includes interviews with people as diverse as Martina Navratilova, Paul Krugman, and Dave Barry, and the author of a shelf full of books, including 2000's In Praise of Commercial Culture, 2007's Discover Your Inner Economist and last year's The Complacent Class.

His work is at once intellectually serious, concise, and engaging, and his unique perspective yields fascinating analyses of activities and subjects that most economists ignore—everything from the literal and figurative prices of fame to how globalization empowers Mexican folk artists to whether public funding for the arts has been more successful than most free-marketers would grant. A recurring theme over the past decade is a fear that America and much of the West may have entered a period he calls "the great stagnation," in which technological innovation and economic growth have slowed even as risk-taking and moonshot-type ventures are demonized or ignored altogether.

I sat down with him to talk about his newest book, Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals. It's an unapologetically libertarian argument for what he calls long-term sustainable economic growth and, more importantly, intellectual and cultural attitudes that are unabashedly devoted to freedom and prosperity. It's a provocative, powerful argument for an America in which government does less, individuals do more, and the future becomes the object of our dreams rather than a repository of our fears.

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The prolific George Mason University economist outlines his unabashedly libertarian argument for a government that does less and individuals who do more. The prolific George Mason University economist outlines his unabashedly libertarian argument for a government that does less and individuals who do more. Reason.com yes 40:23
Who Do You Want to Lose the Midterms Most?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/who-do-you-want-to-see-lose/ Mon, 22 Oct 2018 19:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/22/who-do-you-want-to-see-lose/ https://reason.com/podcast/who-do-you-want-to-see-lose/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/who-do-you-want-to-see-lose/feed/ 88 If hatred is the country's main political motivator these days, you might as well lean into it. America will lose, again. ||| Sergio Flores/REUTERS/Newscom
Sergio Flores/REUTERS/Newscom

From phony Beto-mania to predictable Cruz-baggery, from Medicare-for-all to protecting Medicare, the midterm elections coming two weeks from now are enough to drive a sober man into A.M. tequila shots. So in this era of negative polarization and left/right mob mentalities, perhaps the most fitting question to ask yourself is: Who do you want most to lose?

That's what kicks off this week's editor-roundtable version of the Reason Podcast, featuring Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and myself. We name names (including those few candidates we'd like to see win), talk issues (and lack thereof), and laugh mordantly, since that's preferable to the alternative.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'realest year 9' by Black Ant is licensed under BY NC SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The Only Remarkable Thing About Beto O'Rourke Is How Much the Media Love Him," David Harsanyi

"Desperate to Keep His Seat, Ted Cruz Gets Dumber and Dumber on Criminal Justice," by Jacob Sullum

"Steve King's Fear of Immigrants Is Ignorant of History," by Steve Chapman

"Rep. Duncan Hunter Uses Campaign Funds for Steam Games and Hawaiian Shorts," by Zuri Davis

"Ron Paul–Backed Libertarian Senate Candidate Murray Sabrin Not Getting Polled Despite Running Against Robert Menendez," by Matt Welch

"Libertarian State Senator Wants to Make it Easier for People With Criminal Records (And Everyone Else) to Work," by Brian Doherty

"Libertarians Cover the Polling Spread in 4 Senate Races," by Matt Welch

"Gary Johnson Out-Fundraising Republican Opponent Mick Rich," by Matt Welch

"Rep. Justin Amash Slams 'Pathetic' Spending Bill, Reminds Trump of His Pledge," by Joe Setyon

"Eric Brakey, Republican Senate Candidate in Maine, Endorses Gary Johnson," by Matt Welch

"Despite—or Maybe Because of—Trump's Immigration Crackdown, Record Number of Families Crossing Southern Border," by Nick Gillespie

"Donald Trump Defends Medicare, a Socialist Program, from the Threat of Socialism," by Peter Suderman

"Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, and Why Civility Can't Return To Politics," by Nick Gillespie and Todd Krainin

"Proud Boys, Antifa Clash Again on Portland Streets," by Christian Britschgi

"Attack Ads, Circa 1800," by Meredith Bragg

"The Collectivist Election," by Matt Welch

"To Curb Political Violence, Make Government Less Important," by J.D. Tuccille

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If hatred is the country's main political motivator these days, you might as well lean into it. If hatred is the country's main political motivator these days, you might as well lean into it. Reason.com yes 1:07:08
Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump, and Why Civility Can't Return To Politics https://reason.com/podcast/hillary-clinton-and-why-civility-cant-re/ Fri, 19 Oct 2018 15:35:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/19/hillary-clinton-and-why-civility-cant-re/ https://reason.com/podcast/hillary-clinton-and-why-civility-cant-re/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/hillary-clinton-and-why-civility-cant-re/feed/ 324 When <em>everything</em> is politicized, everything becomes a death match. That ain't good. You can't "be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about," Hillary Clinton told CNN's Christiane Amanpour a week ago, defending the win-at-all-costs mentality that many Democrats are pushing before the midterm elections.

That was before the Republican candidate for governor of Pennsylvania, Scott Wagner, told the Democratic incumbent that he "better put a catcher's mask on your face because I'm going to stomp all over your face with golf spikes because I'm going to win this."

It was before street brawls between right-wing and left-wing groups broke out last weekend in Portland and New York. And it was also before President Donald Trump called porn star Stormy Daniels, who was paid $130,000 by Trump's personal lawyer to keep quiet about sleeping with the billionaire, "horseface" on Twitter.

If politics these days seem especially ugly, that's because they are. Not even counting actual physical attacks on Sen. Rand Paul (R–Ky.) and the shooting of Rep. Steve Scalise (R–La.) during a congressional baseball practice, politics are more heated, divisive, and physically charged than they have been in years.

And for good reason: The people who control politics insist that every piece of legislation, every Supreme Court nomination, every midterm election, every minor rule change is bringing the world one step closer to the apocalypse.

Using plastic straws, kneeling for the national anthem, decade-old tweets—there isn't anything we do anymore that doesn't immediately get sucked into angry partisan arguments. Civility won't return until more of us channel our inner libertarians and realize that not all parts of our lives need to be politicized.

How do you expect people to respond when we're told each day is the beginning of the end of our way of life, that the other side is not just mistaken but pure evil, and we're limited to two parties that represent fewer and fewer of us?

The government is spending more, borrowing more, and controlling more and more aspects of our lives for no reason other than pure political gain.

"If we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that's when civility can start again," says Hillary Clinton.

Yeah, no. If civility can't return to politics unless your team is in charge, you're doing it wrong. Civility is only going to return when people stop treating politics as the only thing that matters—and we start actually shrinking the size, scope, and spending of government and give ourselves some space to breathe.

That's especially true if we're stuck with just two choices who have pledged to screw the other side. Neither Republicans nor Democrats offer a plan where you get to live however you want as long as you're not hurting others. Which helps explain why so few of us want to be part of either party (according to the most recent Gallup survey of political affiliation, just 26 percent of us cop to being Republicans and just 27 percent admit that we're Democrats).

And why civility won't return to politics until politicians stop cramming themselves into every corner of our lives.

Music:

Battleground—Ethan Meixsell https://youtu.be/MJ9Pv_qKxV4

Work Week—Topher Mohr and Alex Elena https://youtu.be/ILlaj33g2j8

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When everything is politicized, everything becomes a death match. That ain't good. When everything is politicized, everything becomes a death match. That ain't good. Reason.com yes
Why 'Gun Culture' Is Every Bit a Part of America as 'Speech Culture': Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/david-harsanyi-podcast-2/ Wed, 17 Oct 2018 15:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/17/david-harsanyi-podcast-2/ https://reason.com/podcast/david-harsanyi-podcast-2/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/david-harsanyi-podcast-2/feed/ 38 David Harsanyi's <em>First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun</em> documents the unique presence of firearms in U.S. life. "We often hear the term 'gun culture' being thrown around as invective," says David Harsanyi in his new book, First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun. But "'gun culture' is no less part of American life than 'religious culture' or 'speech culture.' As our history unambiguously illustrates, gun culture is inextricably tied to American culture. One cannot exist without the other."

Harsanyi's meticulously documented and fluidly written history tells the story of how guns first showed up in the New World and the roles they played not just in fighting wars and settling the frontier but developing all sorts of industrial and commercial breakthroughs in the 19th and 20th centuries. In the latest Reason Podcast, I also talk with him about current battles over gun control and why calls for greater restrictions on ownership and the ability to carry often come when gun violence is ebbing rather than increasing.

Harsanyi is a senior editor at The Federalist, a syndicated columnist, and the author of several previous books, including The People Have Spoken (and They Are Wrong): The Case Against Democracy and Nanny State: How Food Fascists, Teetotaling Do-Gooders, Priggish Moralists, and other Boneheaded Bureaucrats are Turning America into a Nation of Children.

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David Harsanyi's First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun documents the unique presence of firearms in U.S. life. David Harsanyi's First Freedom: A Ride Through America's Enduring History with the Gun documents the unique presence of firearms in U.S. life. Reason.com yes 37:33
Should We Sell Weapons to Saudi Arabia?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-sell-weapons-to-saudi/ Mon, 15 Oct 2018 18:45:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/15/should-we-sell-weapons-to-saudi/ https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-sell-weapons-to-saudi/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/should-we-sell-weapons-to-saudi/feed/ 32 It's bad when U.S. presidents think of weapons sales to dictatorships as jobs programs, but should we remove political constraints on arms dealing altogether? ||| REUTERS TV/REUTERS/Newscom
REUTERS TV/REUTERS/Newscom

When Lesley Stahl asked President Donald Trump how he would punish Saudi Arabia if the oil-rich dictatorship was found to have murdered Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, the president quickly turned the conversation toward the importance of arms sales to American jobs. Was that the right answer?

No it wasn't, argue editors Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and Matt Welch on the Monday editor-roundtable version of the Reason Podcast. But maybe, they add, that's an argument for re-examining whether government should have any role in limiting commerce between U.S. companies and far-flung baddies. The discussion then ranges from the ethics of dictatorship junkets to seasonal Saudi-bashing syndrome to Trump's ongoing presidency-demystification project, before moving on to the politics of anti–political correctness and the trauma-absorbing qualities of Mr. Rogers.

Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast at iTunes. Listen at SoundCloud below:

Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'18—Ghosts II' by Nine Inch Nails is licensed under CC BY NC SA 3.0

Relevant links from the show:

"Did Saudi Arabia Murder This Expat Journalist for Criticizing the Government?," by Joe Setyon

"Jamal Khashoggi Disappearance Doesn't Seem to Faze White House," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"With the Saudis, Trump Shows Timidity," by Steve Chapman

"Rand Paul Says He'll Try to Block Saudi Arms Sales Over Khashoggi Disappearance," by Brian Doherty

"The President Shouldn't Act as an Arms Dealer to the Saudis," by Veronique de Rugy

"American-Backed Saudi Coalition Kills 40 Children in Airstrike, Injures Dozens More," by Nikhil Sridhar

"Trump's 60 Minutes Interview Further Demystifies the Presidency," by Nick Gillespie

"Study: 80% of Americans Believe Political Correctness Is a Problem," by Robby Soave

"Don't Take Too Much Comfort From Surveys Showing Widespread Opposition to 'Political Correctness'," by Ilya Somin

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It's bad when U.S. presidents think of weapons sales to dictatorships as jobs programs, but should we remove political constraints on arms dealing altogether? It's bad when U.S. presidents think of weapons sales to dictatorships as jobs programs, but should we remove political constraints on arms dealing altogether? Reason.com yes 58:08
Most Libertarians Don't Understand Friedrich Hayek, Says Peter Boettke: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/pete-boettke-podcast/ Fri, 12 Oct 2018 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/12/pete-boettke-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/pete-boettke-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/pete-boettke-podcast/feed/ 43 In a bold new book about Hayek, the George Mason economist says "too much time and effort has been put into repackaging and marketing a fixed doctrine of eternal truths." With populism on the rise, capitalism under attack, and socialism back in vogue, the work of Austrian economist Friedrich Hayek (1899–1992) is more relevant than ever. Hayek started his career as a wunderkind professor, joining the faculty of the London School of Economics in his early 30s, and was a central figure in the debates that consumed the profession during the Great Depression. He would go on to spend most of his seven-decade-long career as an outsider, his work diverging from the mainstream following the Keynesian revolution of the 1930s and '40s. Eventually the world circled back to Hayek's ideas, and he was one of two recipients of the 1974 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics.

Today, Hayek is best known for his enduring insights on emergent order, for his critique of central planning, and for his argument that all knowledge in society is decentralized and that a modern economy thus relies on the coordinating role of prices and private property. In his final book, The Fatal Conceit, Hayek wrote that "the curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design."

Hayek's enormous body of work is the subject of a new book by the George Mason University economist Peter Boettke, which takes a deep dive into Hayek's writing and serves as a rousing call for a serious rethinking of libertarian and classical liberal thought.

"Liberalism is in need of renewal," writes Boettke, who started his career as an expert on post-communist economics in the former Soviet Union. "Too much time and effort has been put into repackaging and marketing a fixed doctrine of eternal truths, rather than rethinking and evolving to meet the new challenges." Even Hayek, Boettke notes, made mistakes late in his career, such as his kind words for the Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Hayek's great legacy is his understanding of economics and liberal political theory as a process for creating a world in which individuals and society could become more free, equal, and prosperous over time.

In this Reason Podcast, I talk with Boettke about the historical and intellectual context of Hayek's thought, the influence of Hayek's mentor Ludwig von Mises on his work, and how libertarians can follow Hayek's dictum that "we must make the building of a free society once more an intellectual adventure, a deed of courage."

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In a bold new book about Hayek, the George Mason economist says "too much time and effort has been put into repackaging and marketing a fixed doctrine of eternal truths." In a bold new book about Hayek, the George Mason economist says "too much time and effort has been put into repackaging and marketing a fixed doctrine of eternal truths." Reason.com yes 1:19:11
Tom Woods: The Making of an Anti-War Libertarian https://reason.com/podcast/tom-woods-inteview/ Wed, 10 Oct 2018 17:40:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/10/tom-woods-inteview/ https://reason.com/podcast/tom-woods-inteview/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/tom-woods-inteview/feed/ 25 <em>Reason</em>'s Matt Welch sat down with the popular libertarian writer and podcaster to discuss his ideological journey, his LP plans, and controversial past associations. Tom Woods stands accused of many things, but laziness is not one of them.

A senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, Woods is the author of a dozen books, including The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History. He's written curricula for the Ron Paul homeschool program; he co-hosts, along with economist Robert Murphy, the weekly Contra-Krugman podcast, which dissects columns by New York Times Nobel laureate Paul Krugman; and he posts a new episode of the popular Tom Woods Show every day.

A champion of the Austrian School of economics and a devotee of Murray Rothbard, Woods didn't exactly start out as a radical anti-statist. He was, he says, a "moderate Republican," happy to lavish government spending on domestic programs and to launch bombs at evildoers abroad. It was the 1992 presidential campaign of Pat Buchanan, who was against the Gulf War and opposed to new military adventures abroad, that began the transformation. Now, Woods is one of the leading antiwar voices in the libertarian movement.

Never one to shy away from a social media scrap, Woods got into an epic Twitter feud last summer with the leadership of the Libertarian Party. One side called the Mises Institute a gateway drug to white nationalism and the alt-right, while Woods and his allies mocked the Libertarian National Committee as a bunch of "social justice warriors." Then something curious happened: After the L.P.'s Mises Caucus failed to dislodge party chair Nicholas Sarwark at this year's national convention, Woods and his friends redoubled their efforts to transform the party from within.

I sat down with Woods recently to talk about his ideological journey, his plans with the Libertarian Party, his past associations with such controversial entities as the League of the South, and his assessment of Donald Trump, among many other topics.

Edited by Mark McDaniel and Todd Krainin. Cameras by Jim Epstein and McDaniel.

Oxygen Garden by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Attribution License.

Photo credit: George Skidmore. (CC BY-SA 2.0.)

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Reason's Matt Welch sat down with the popular libertarian writer and podcaster to discuss his ideological journey, his LP plans, and controversial past associations. Reason's Matt Welch sat down with the popular libertarian writer and podcaster to discuss his ideological journey, his LP plans, and controversial past associations. Reason.com yes 55:27
What Did We Learn from the Brett Kavanaugh Confirmation?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-we-learn-from-the-brett/ Mon, 08 Oct 2018 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/08/what-did-we-learn-from-the-brett/ https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-we-learn-from-the-brett/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/what-did-we-learn-from-the-brett/feed/ 131 On the market for political combat and the lack of interest in the Afghanistan War ||| Emily Molli/NurPhoto/Sipa USA/Newscom
Emily Molli/NurPhoto/Sipa USA/Newscom

The bruising fight over the narrow confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh is not going away. Republicans are gloating, Democrats are trial-ballooning impeachment and re-thinking the American structure of government, and both sides are claiming increases in voter enthusiasm. Just maybe, argue Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and yours truly in the Monday editor-roundtable edition of the Reason Podcast, this is the market for political combat at work.

Besides chewing over the many post-confirmation arguments, the quartet also discusses the 17th anniversary of the Afghanistan War and other grim policy fails that few can hear under all that shrieking. Also: Scooters!

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'Two in The Back' by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under CC BY NC 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The Senate Votes to Confirm Brett Kavanaugh," by Zuri Davis

"Brett Kavanaugh Will Be Confirmed, and Liberals Should Blame Michael Avenatti," by Robby Soave

"Jeff Flake and the Hated—Yet Vital—Libertarian Center," by Matt Welch

"The Case Against Court-Packing Revisited," by Ilya Somin

"Your Vote Doesn't Count," by Katherine Mangu-Ward

"Immigrant Girl Will Be Deported Because Adoptive Father Missed Deadline While Serving in Afghanistan," by Nick Gillespie

"Worldwide Refugee Population Hits All-Time High, U.S. Intake Reaches All-Time Low," by Matt Welch

"In Afghanistan, We Persist in Futility," by Steve Chapman

"Another Grim Report About the Afghanistan War. Is There Anyone Who Cares?" by Ed Krayewski

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On the market for political combat and the lack of interest in the Afghanistan War On the market for political combat and the lack of interest in the Afghanistan War Reason.com yes 1:06:00
Median Household Income Is at an All-Time High. Are You Happy Yet?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/mark-perry-record-high-median-income/ Wed, 03 Oct 2018 16:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/03/mark-perry-record-high-median-income/ https://reason.com/podcast/mark-perry-record-high-median-income/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/mark-perry-record-high-median-income/feed/ 55 Economist Mark J. Perry talks about rising incomes, flattening inequality, low unemployment, and why none of it seems to make us feel better.

Mark J. Perry, Carpe Diem

Here's some really good news: Median household income in the United States is at a record-high, inflation-adjusted $61,372. When you factor in the fact that today's households contain fewer people, the news is even better. In 1975, for instance, average income per person per household was just $19,500 in 2017 dollars. Now it's $34,000.

And get a load of this: There's no evidence that income inequality has grown since the 1990s, or that the ability to move up and down the income ladder has shrunk in that time period. More people than ever live in households pulling down $100,000 (again, adjusted for inflation) than ever. Fewer households make less than $35,000 (adjusted for inflation).

All of this comes courtesy of the U.S. Census, as compiled and analyzed by economist Mark J. Perry. Perry works at the American Enterprise Institute and the University of Michigan (Flint), and he runs the blog Carpe Diem.

Do you feel happy yet? On today's Reason Podcast, I talk with Perry both about his findings and why we don't feel richer, happier, or more secure than we do. Perry isn't a Trump booster by any means, but he suggests that some of the president's policies—particularly the reductions in certain taxes and regulations—are helping to keep an economic expansion that started under Barack Obama moving along. At the same time, he worries about accumulating debt and trade wars that can raise prices and introduce wild uncertainty into the economy. When investors "see that there's uncertainty about policy," he says, "that starts to distort decision making and capital spending."

Perry suggests one reason we don't feel more satisfied with economic improvements is that they are a feature and not a bug of a free enterprise system. "The benefits of a market economy and the march of progress are so constant and so gradual that either we don't appreciate it or don't notice it," he says. "So we have an under-appreciation of how much better things get all the time. If it happened all at once, we'd probably just be amazed."

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Economist Mark J. Perry talks about rising incomes, flattening inequality, low unemployment, and why none of it seems to make us feel better. Economist Mark J. Perry talks about rising incomes, flattening inequality, low unemployment, and why none of it seems to make us feel better. Reason.com yes 33:17
Texas Says 'Pickles' Only Come From Cucumbers. So This Couple's Farm Went Out of Business. https://reason.com/podcast/texas-pickle-regulations/ Tue, 02 Oct 2018 14:40:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/02/texas-pickle-regulations/ https://reason.com/podcast/texas-pickle-regulations/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/texas-pickle-regulations/feed/ 56 Anita and Jim McHaney are suing to overturn "preposterous" regulations on cottage food production. Anita and Jim McHaney are retirees who moved from Houston to the Texas countryside in 2013. Their plan was to live well and grow food on a 10-acre homestead, earning extra money selling produce at the local farmers market. They grew okra, carrots, kale, swiss chard, and beets. Lots and lots of beets.

"That soil out there is very sandy, and those beets just grew like mad," says Anita. "Now the obvious thing to do when you have more beets than you can sell, is to make pickled beets and can them."

And this is where the McHaney's ran into trouble.

Like most states, Texas has a so-called "cottage food law" that exempts certain items sold at farmers markets from the state's commercial food manufacturing regulations—foods like bread, produce, nuts, jams, popcorn, and, of course, pickles.

But what constitutes a "pickle," and who gets to decide? The McHaneys discovered that the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) takes the narrow view.

According to the DSHS, "A pickle is a cucumber preserved in vinegar, brine, or similar solution, only pickled cucumbers are allowed under the cottage food law. All other pickled vegetables are prohibited"

"The legislature didn't say that, the health department did," Anita explains.

So in order to sell their pickled beets at the farmers market, the McHaneys needed a commercial food manufacturers license, to build a commercial kitchen, submit their recipes to a government contractor at Texas A&M University, and register for a $700 food manufacturing class. However, the class is only offered once a year.

"We got right down to signing up for the class…even though people said 'you won't learn a damn thing in there,'" says Anita. "Then I saw that $700. I thought, you know, this is crazy. This is insanity."

The McHaney's neighbor, Virginia Cox, also grows and sells food at the local farmers market. She'd like to be able to pickle her leftover okra.

"I can make a whole lot more on it pickled because if it doesn't sell this week, I can take it back to the market next week," says Cox. "If it's fresh and it doesn't sell this week, it's not gonna sell next week."

Today, the McHaney's farm lies fallow. But they have decided to take the state of Texas to court with the help of the Dallas law firm Drinker, Biddle & Reath, who took on the case pro-bono.

Their main argument is that the regulations on cottage food production are unreasonable and stifle their economic opportunities.

"People can't afford that stuff, it shuts them out," says Anita.

As precedent, the McHaney's case invokes the landmark 2015 decision by Justice Don Willett striking down occupational licensing for Texas eyebrow threaders.

They're challenging the health department's definition of pickles and subsequent regulation on the grounds that it impinges on their "constitutionally protected right to earn an honest living."

The Texas Department of State Health Services wouldn't comment on the pending lawsuit, but defended the agency's rule as reflecting "the most common" interpretation of the word "pickle."

"It forces you, if you want to do a pickled beet, to go to a $700 class that has nothing to do with home canning," says Jim. "And now we've got hundreds and hundreds of occupations where you have to pay the government to do your job."

For now, the case is still pending, but the McHaney's are optimistic about its outcome.

"You know, we talk about pickling beets, but it's a lot, lot, bigger issue. It's about economic freedom," says Jim.

Video produced, shot, and edited by Mark McDaniel.

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Anita and Jim McHaney are suing to overturn "preposterous" regulations on cottage food production. Anita and Jim McHaney are suing to overturn "preposterous" regulations on cottage food production. Reason.com yes
Kavanaugh Brawl Shows It's Time for a Controlled Burn of the State: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/kavanaugh-brawl-shows-its-time/ Mon, 01 Oct 2018 19:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/10/01/kavanaugh-brawl-shows-its-time/ https://reason.com/podcast/kavanaugh-brawl-shows-its-time/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/kavanaugh-brawl-shows-its-time/feed/ 78 Lying about the Devil's Triangle may or may not be disqualifying for the Supreme Court, but this whole process is a reminder that the federal government's power makes politics too important. ||| Valentin Rodriguez/agefotostock/Newscom
Valentin Rodriguez/agefotostock/Newscom

Is Brett Kavanaugh lying about boofing, the Ralph Club, and the Devil's Triangle? And if so, should that be disqualifying for the Supreme Court, even if the process that led to such cross-examination was grotesquely cynical and partisan? Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, Nick Gillespie, and yours truly are split on these and other questions in this moment of national anger and anguish, as you can hear on the Monday editor-roundtable version of the Reason Podcast, but they do agree on one thing: To quote Robby Soave, "at this lowest of moments for political discourse," it's worth remembering that "the libertarian vision for society is one in which politics plays a much smaller role."

The editors also discuss Sen. Jeff Flake (R–Ariz.) and the hated temperamental center, the latest poll numbers about political self-affiliation, the great reasonminus50 Twitter feed, and more.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'The Life and Death of a Certain K. Zabriskie, Patriarch' by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under CC BY 4.0

Relevant links from the show:

"The Kavanaugh Nomination Fight Has Pulled Us Further Into a Partisan Quagmire," by Peter Suderman

"Jeff Flake and the Hated—Yet Vital—Libertarian Center," by Matt Welch

"Brett Kavanaugh's Anger Should Surprise No One," by Robby Soave

"Christine Blasey Ford Was Worth Hearing, But No One on the Senate Judiciary Committee Was Listening," by Robby Soave

"Beer, Courage, and Vomit: Major Themes of the Ford-Kavanaugh Hearing," by Jacob Sullum

"Brett Kavanaugh's Illegal Beer Consumption Highlights the Perversity of Drinking Ages," by Jacob Sullum

"3 Questions To Ask Yourself While Watching the Kavanaugh/Ford Hearings Today," by Nick Gillespie

"Supreme Court to Consider Tree Frogs, Liquor Licensing, Criminals With Dementia, and More This Fall," by Elizabeth Nolan Brown

"Here's What Congress Was Doing While You Were Watching the Kavanaugh Circus," by Eric Boehm

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Lying about the Devil's Triangle may or may not be disqualifying for the Supreme Court, but this whole process is a reminder that the federal government's power makes politics too important. Lying about the Devil's Triangle may or may not be disqualifying for the Supreme Court, but this whole process is a reminder that the federal government's power makes politics too important. Reason.com yes 55:06
'We Are Always on the Verge of Chaos:' The PJ O'Rourke Interview https://reason.com/podcast/pj-orourke-interview/ Fri, 28 Sep 2018 19:38:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/28/pj-orourke-interview/ https://reason.com/podcast/pj-orourke-interview/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/pj-orourke-interview/feed/ 28 The libertarian humorist talks about his new book, how to drink in war zones, and why the Chinese are more American than most U.S. citizens. For the last 45 years, no writer has taken a bigger blowtorch to the sacred cows of American life than libertarian humorist P.J. O'Rourke.

As a writer at National Lampoon in the 1970s, he co-authored best-selling parodies of high school yearbooks and Sunday newspapers. For Rolling Stone, The Atlantic, and other publications, O'Rourke traveled to war zones and other disaster areas, chronicling the folly of military and economic intervention. In 1991, he came out with Parliament of Whores, which explained why politicians should be the last people to have any power. Subtitled "A Lone Humorist Attempts to Explain the Entire U.S. Government," this international bestseller probably minted more libertarians than any book since Free to Choose or Atlas Shrugged. More recently, O'Rourke published a critical history of his own Baby Boomer generation and How The Hell Did This Happen?, a richly reported account of Donald Trump's unexpected 2016 presidential victory.

O'Rourke's new book, None of My Business, explains "why he's not rich and neither are you." It's partly the result of hanging out with wealthy money managers and businessmen and what they've taught him over the years about creating meaning and value in an ever richer and crazier world. It covers everything from social media to learning how to drink in war zones to why the Chinese may be more American than U.S. citizens. He also explains why even though he doesn't understand or like a lot of things about modern technology, he doesn't fear Amazon or Google, especially compared to people who are calling for Socialism 2.0.

I sat down with O'Rourke to talk about all that, the good and bad of Donald Trump, and why being an "old white man" just isn't what it used to be (and why he's OK with that).

Edited by Ian Keyser. Cameras by Jim Epstein and Mark McDaniel. Intro by Todd Krainin.

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The libertarian humorist talks about his new book, how to drink in war zones, and why the Chinese are more American than most U.S. citizens. The libertarian humorist talks about his new book, how to drink in war zones, and why the Chinese are more American than most U.S. citizens. Reason.com yes 45:08
Nobel Prize Winner Joseph Stiglitz, Hugo Chavez, and the Return of Socialism: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/epstein-on-stiglitz-podcast/ Thu, 27 Sep 2018 17:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/27/epstein-on-stiglitz-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/epstein-on-stiglitz-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/epstein-on-stiglitz-podcast/feed/ 39 Journalist and Soho Forum co-founder Gene Epstein on economists' romance with strongmen and his upcoming debate with <em>Jacobin</em>'s Bhaskar Sunkara. For a quarter of a century, Gene Epstein was the economics editor and a columnist at the business magazine Barron's. Before that, he served as an economist for the New York Stock Exchange. Now, he runs The Soho Forum, a monthly Oxford-style debate series held in New York that covers topics of special interests to libertarians. (As a co-sponsor, Reason records and releases audio and video versions of each debate. Go here for a full archive).

Epstein has just published a major essay in City Journal, the magazine of the Manhattan Institute, about the long and error-prone career of Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, whom he calls "continually mistaken" but "chronically admired." Stiglitz, writes Epstein, is the apotheosis of "elite myopia" when it comes to trusting government over free markets to improve the lives of the poor. Read the article here.

In the latest Reason Podcast, I talk with Epstein about the continuing influence of Stiglitz, a former adviser to Bill Clinton and chief economist at the World Bank who is a favorite of progressive Democrats such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D–Mass.). We also talk about Epstein's upcoming October 15 debate in New York with Bhaskar Sunkara, the editor and publisher of the left-wing Jacobin magazine, about whether socialism or capitalism is the better system for making people more free and prosperous. To buy tickets, which must be purchased in advance, go here now.

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Journalist and Soho Forum co-founder Gene Epstein on economists' romance with strongmen and his upcoming debate with Jacobin's Bhaskar Sunkara. Journalist and Soho Forum co-founder Gene Epstein on economists' romance with strongmen and his upcoming debate with Jacobin's Bhaskar Sunkara. Reason.com yes 59:43
Francis Fukuyama Says Identity Politics Are Killing America and Empowering Donald Trump: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/fukuyama-podcast/ Wed, 26 Sep 2018 19:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/26/fukuyama-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/fukuyama-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/fukuyama-podcast/feed/ 17 Since the publication of his 1989 essay "The End of History?," no political scientist has been more influential in discussions<a href="https://reason.com/podcast/fukuyama-podcast/">...</a> Since the publication of his 1989 essay "The End of History?," no political scientist has been more influential in discussions of global democracy than Francis Fukuyama. In the years since then, the Stanford professor has authored a shelf full of prescient and commanding texts, including The End of History and the Last Man, Trust: The Social Virtues and the Creaton of Prosperity, and Our Post-Human Future: Consequences of the Biotechnology Revolution. (In 2002, he debated biophysicist Gregory Stock in the pages at Reason on the advisability of human cloning; read their exchange here and here.)

Once a neoconservative who staunchly believed in military intervention and nation building, Fukuyama has been chastened by the failure of U.S. foreign policy since 9/11 and has renounced his early support for the invasion and occupation in Iraq. In his new book Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, he argues that the rise of populism, nationalism, and grievance cultures based on racial, ethnic, and gender identity both here and abroad are undermining the basis of liberal democracy and threaten economic prosperity and peace. "Every single one of these struggles is justified," Fukuyama told The Chronicle of Higher Education recently. "The problem is in the way we interpret injustice and how we try to solve it, which tends to fragment society."

I spoke with Fukuyama about Identity, whether it's possible to create a national identity that is capable of bringing Americans of all sorts together without becoming oppressive and stultifying, and why he believes that a Democratic win in the midterm elections is essential to checking what he sees as the authoritarian tendencies of Donald Trump.

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Since the publication of his 1989 essay "The End of History?," no political scientist has been more influential in discussions... Since the publication of his 1989 essay "The End of History?," no political scientist has been more influential in discussions... Reason.com yes 56:05
Would More Gun Control Lead to More Crime? A Debate https://reason.com/podcast/gary-kleck-paul-helmke-gun-control/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 20:30:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/24/gary-kleck-paul-helmke-gun-control/ https://reason.com/podcast/gary-kleck-paul-helmke-gun-control/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/gary-kleck-paul-helmke-gun-control/feed/ 44 Criminologist Gary Kleck debated Paul Helmke, the former president and CEO of the Brady Center, at the Soho Forum. Does defensive gun use stop crime? Would more gun control save lives? Those were the topics of a public debate recently hosted by the Soho Forum, featuring Gary Kleck, a criminologist from Florida State University, and Paul Helmke, the former president and CEO of the Brady Center/Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence as well as the former mayor of Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Kleck argued that there are at least four times as many defensive gun uses by potential victims as there are by criminals, and that new gun controls would reduce the defensive uses far more than the criminal ones. Helmke questioned Kleck's take on the data.

The debate was held on September 13, 2018, at the SubCulture Theater in Manhattan's East Village. Soho Forum Director Gene Epstein moderated. Comedian Dave Smith, host of the podcast Part of the Problem, was the opening act.

The full resolution read: While laws that prohibit gun ownership would reduce crimes perpetrated by criminals, that benefit would be more than offset by the foregone opportunities for defensive gun use by victims of crime.

It was an Oxford-style debate in which the audience votes on the resolution at the beginning and end of the event, and the side that gains the most ground is victorious. Kleck, arguing the affirmative, prevailed by convincing about six percent of audience members to change their minds.

All Soho Forums are turned into Reason videos and podcasts. Go here for a full archive.

Kleck's research has focused on the impact of firearms and gun control on violence, deterrence, and crime control. He is the author of Point Blank: Guns and Violence in America, which won the 1993 Michael J. Hindelang Award of the American Society of Criminology. He also wrote Targeting Guns (1997) and, with Don B. Kates, Jr., The Great American Gun Debate (1997) and Armed (2001), and, with Brion Sever, Punishment and Crime (2017).

Helmke is a professor of practice at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs, and he is the founding director of the Civic Leaders Living-Learning Center in Bloomington, IN.

Edited by Todd Krainin.

"Modum" by Kai Engle is licensed under a CC-BY creative commons license.

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Criminologist Gary Kleck debated Paul Helmke, the former president and CEO of the Brady Center, at the Soho Forum. Criminologist Gary Kleck debated Paul Helmke, the former president and CEO of the Brady Center, at the Soho Forum. Reason.com yes 1:21:04
Will Public Discourse Ever Recover from the Kavanaugh Hearings?: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/talk-show-9-24-podcast/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 20:15:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/24/talk-show-9-24-podcast/ https://reason.com/podcast/talk-show-9-24-podcast/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/talk-show-9-24-podcast/feed/ 146 <em>Reason</em>'s editors discuss the latest Brett Kavanaugh revelations, Rod Rosentein's fate, and how to recover basic norms of political discourse. Over the weekend, The New Yorker published explosive new allegations of sexual impropriety by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, this time involving an alleged incident from his freshman year at Yale in the early 1980s. Since then, Kavanaugh has flatly denied everything, President Trump has said he stands with the judge, and The New York Times has questioned the veracity of the new story. The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to hear testimony from Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, the judge's earlier accuser, on Thursday.

In today's Reason Podcast, Matt Welch, Katherine Mangu-Ward, Peter Suderman, and I discuss the fallout of the Kavanaugh hearing not just as it relates to the future of the Supreme Court but to journalistic norms and public discourse. We also talk about the uncertain fate of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who may be out from his role of overseeing Robert Mueller and the federal probe into Russian influence in the 2016 election. And we talk about what we've been reading, watching, and listening to.

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Audio production by Ian Keyser.

'CGI Snake' by Chris Zabriski is licensed under CC BY 4.0

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Reason's editors discuss the latest Brett Kavanaugh revelations, Rod Rosentein's fate, and how to recover basic norms of political discourse. Reason's editors discuss the latest Brett Kavanaugh revelations, Rod Rosentein's fate, and how to recover basic norms of political discourse. Reason.com yes 1:04:15
Faisal Al Mutar Fights Radical Islam with Western Bestsellers https://reason.com/podcast/faisal-al-mutar/ Fri, 21 Sep 2018 16:42:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/21/faisal-al-mutar/ https://reason.com/podcast/faisal-al-mutar/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/faisal-al-mutar/feed/ 20 The head of Ideas Beyond Borders is translating books by Steven Pinker, Sam Harris, and others into Arabic and distributing them for free. Imagine growing up in Baghdad and seeing your brother and cousin killed by Al Qaeda and other sectarian forces. Imagine getting death threats from groups such as the Madhi Army, a religious militia that once controlled large parts of the U.S.–occupied Iraq.

That's some of what 27-year-old Faisal Saeed Al Mutar faced during his childhood. Born into a family that prized analytical thinking and independent thought, he wrote critically of Islam and lived a secular lifestyle, making him a target for radical groups. Mutar fled to the U.S. five years ago.

Here he heads Ideas Beyond Borders, a nonprofit that promotes freedom of expression in authoritarian countries. I sat down with Mutar to talk about his life, his personal experience with radical Islam, and Ideas Beyond Borders' latest project: translating into Arabic the works of secular Enlightenment thinkers such as Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker and distributing them to readers in North Africa and the Middle East.

Edited by Todd Krainin. Cameras by Jim Epstein and Mark McDaniel.

"Please Listen Carefully" by Jahzzar is licensed under a CC BY-SA License.

"Chantiers Navals 412" by LJ Kruzer is licensed under a CC BY-NC License.

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The head of Ideas Beyond Borders is translating books by Steven Pinker, Sam Harris, and others into Arabic and distributing them for free. The head of Ideas Beyond Borders is translating books by Steven Pinker, Sam Harris, and others into Arabic and distributing them for free. Reason.com yes 21:36
Meet Rachel Goldsmith, the Woman Running the Free State Project: Podcast https://reason.com/podcast/meet-rachel-goldsmith-the-woman-running/ Tue, 18 Sep 2018 17:00:00 +0000 http://reason.com/2018/09/18/meet-rachel-goldsmith-the-woman-running/ https://reason.com/podcast/meet-rachel-goldsmith-the-woman-running/#comments https://reason.com/podcast/meet-rachel-goldsmith-the-woman-running/feed/ 30 Members are moving to New Hampshire and running for office in record numbers. Will they bring "liberty in our lifetime"? Earlier this year, Rachel Goldsmith became executive director of the Free State Project, which describes itself as "a mass migration of more than 20,000 people who have pledged to move to New Hampshire." By concentrating themselves in one state, the Free Staters plan to become a bloc pushing New Hampshire toward more libertarian policies.

In the latest Reason Podcast, Goldsmith, an MBA originally from Albany, New York, tells me that the number of year-over-year "movers" to New Hampshire has doubled, and that many of the people associated with the movement who have run in the state's primaries have won. While the Free State Project doesn't endorse specific candidates or pieces of legislation, more than a dozen current legislators are allied with the group. "It's been pretty inspiring," she says. "We're definitely in the 'family wave' of things. We have a lot of folks with kids and young professionals who are considering having kids coming to our events."

In a wide-ranging conversation, Goldsmith also previewed the group's annual winter event, Liberty Forum. To be held February 7–9 of next year in Manchester, the gathering will be keynoted by Cody Wilson, head of Defense Distributed, a nonprofit that develops and publishes open-source gun designs suitable for 3D printing and digital manufacture.

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Members are moving to New Hampshire and running for office in record numbers. Will they bring "liberty in our lifetime"? Members are moving to New Hampshire and running for office in record numbers. Will they bring "liberty in our lifetime"? Reason.com yes 29:58