California

Californians Are Fleeing the State's Progressive Policies

California's progressive political imperatives are having such glaring real-world repercussions that it's hard to keep ignoring them.

|

I remember getting that phone call 20-some years ago while at my desk at The Lima News, which was a sister newspaper to The Orange County Register. "Would I like to come to California to work at the Register," the editor asked? "Why, yes," I eagerly said. "When do I start?" I forgot to ask about the salary.

When I told my wife the exciting news, she asked if we were going to weigh the pros and cons of such a big move from our cozy Ohio town to sprawling Southern California. "No," I answered. "There's nothing to discuss." We're going to California and, unlike the words in the Led Zeppelin song, it's not with an "aching in my heart." After crossing the border near Needles, in the 110-degree desert heat, I fell in love with the place and never looked East again.

Like others from the Midwest and East, I had long dreamed of the Golden State. By then, of course, California already ceased to be the magnet it was in earlier decades. The number of Americans who left California for other states had surpassed those from other states who moved here. Immigration rates and birth rates were still growing, however, which has propelled our population from 30 million in 1990 to nearly 40 million now.

"Nearly" is the key word. California has been inching toward the 40 million mark for some time but hasn't reached it. Its growth rate last year of 0.47 percent is the slowest in recorded history. The exodus to other states has accelerated. International immigration has slowed. Even births are lower this year than last year. We're a long way from the Gold Rush, when fortune-seekers from around the world tripled California's population in a flash.

Based on the latest U.S. Census data, domestic out-migration to places such as Texas, Arizona and Oregon has outstripped domestic in-migration for eight years in a row. Anecdotal stories abound. One friend, who we met shortly after moving to Fullerton, is now a successful Texas Realtor who specializes in relocating Californians to Dallas.

Another California acquaintance, who now lives in Pennsylvania, helps our state's businesses relocate. At social events, people always talk about the states where they are considering moving. Recent surveys show that 53 percent of Californians are considering moving elsewhere. Such ideas used to be heresy. I've lived in seven states plus the District of Columbia and, quite frankly, the rest of the country seems drab in comparison to California. But, lately, I'm starting to think these California refugees have made a wise choice.

We've reached the tipping point, where California's progressive political imperatives are having such glaring real-world repercussions that it's hard to keep ignoring them. Why are people leaving? Top of the list is home affordability. The national median home price is around $227,000. The median single-family home price in California topped $600,000.

In Orange County, that median price is around $700,000. In the entire Bay Area, the median price for homes and condos is $860,000. In San Francisco, you'll need a cool $1.7 million (listed price) to get a median-priced abode (and it's not going to be special). Our cost-of-living is astronomical in many areas. Gasoline prices are $1.29 a gallon more than the national average. Even California's notoriously overpaid government retirees are moving elsewhere.

This is the fault of public policy. Regulations and fees can add 40 percent or more to the cost of every new house. Slow-growth rules, and the lawsuit-generating California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), impede housing construction. The state is vastly underbuilding the number of housing units it needs even to keep up with its slowing population. Gas prices are high not only because of our high taxes, but because of the special California-only formulation that limits competition.

We all know about our nationally high tax burdens. Our property taxes are reasonable, thanks to Proposition 13, but liberal groups are gunning for its protections on commercial properties in a 2020 ballot measure. They'll probably be coming for your home protections next. Regulatory burdens make it tougher to grow a business here than elsewhere.

Recently, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill 5 into law, which messes with our ability to earn a living. That law forbids many types of contract labor. But many people don't want to be 9-5 wage slaves and prefer piecing together various contract jobs. Businesses aren't going to respond by hiring everyone as permanent workers. This will squelch job growth, especially in California's innovative tech economy.

We're also facing statewide rent controls, which will further depress housing availability. And just wait until lawmakers make good on their promise to provide single-payer healthcare. I've been to all 58 counties and still love the terrain, climate, culture and beaches. But if I were to get that call today, I'd have that long discussion with my wife before agreeing to move here.

This column was first published in the Orange County Register.

NEXT: Gemini Man Is an Extended Visit to the Uncanny Valley

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

Please to post comments

245 responses to “Californians Are Fleeing the State's Progressive Policies

  1. Stay there; we don’t want you.

    1. This right here, you guys messed up a beautiful place with near limitless wealth with your idiotic ideas. One can only imagine what you would do when you reached a critical mass in other states.

      1. You don’t have to imagine. Come visit Colorado.

        Given that the average “libertarian/conservative” Californian is still left of center on the national scale, and conditioned to think like progressives when considering the amount and direction of state government policy, it does not take long for ex-Cali hordes to start woking their new location.

        1. Oregon and Washington, as well.

          The new trend is for tech contractors to work for companies in California, but live in red states with low cost of living, like Idaho. Boise is becoming increasingly proglydyte as a result.

          1. The right-wing enclaves are going to continue to diminish in number, population, quality, and influence.

            Losing the culture war has consequences. So does bright flight.

            1. I for one can’t wait for my betters to start taking over the town.

              Our houses are still affordable and worse, we are suffering from a desperate lack of bums crapping on the sidewalk.

            2. You should shove a .45 up your ass and pull the trigger, you useless hick.

            3. Haha. You’re funny rev. Such a self important warrior. How cute!

              Don’t change a thing, old man. You’re doing great!

            4. You are confusing culture things, with which many agree, with breads and circuses and yachts for lawyers as policy, which is wrecking California.

              Why do your fellow statesmen flee you…and their own votes? Why do you express glee at them moving elsewhere and trashing those states, too?

            5. Yea that’s why all the liberals in Portland try living in “no state income tax” Washington…

              The sad part is they’re just all too ignorant to realize they’re trying to flee the very economic policies they would tell you they support.

              1. Despite a state constitutional ban on an income tax, Washington implemented one anyway. They simply called is a “payroll” tax. It’s perfect, it leaves Google, Amazon and Microsoft profits alone while robbing their employees. No complaints from the CEOs and all the money the politicians want to “help the homeless” whose numbers increase far faster than the economy that supports them.

                Washington is now a one party state (no Republicans hold any statewide office and both legislatures are controlled by Democrat majorities.)

                Washington is doomed so if you’re looking for a place to live, WA is not it. Try Wyoming, or buy an RV, equip it to live off the grid and disappear into the southwest.

            6. I work at a multi-national tech company. My manager, located in Califonia, says she hasn’t been able to actually hire a person that has been willing to relocate to the San Jose area in 30 years! Recently two of our team members from California relocated, one to Washington, the other to Kentucky.

              1. Looks like “bright flight” in reverse to me.

        2. 4th-gen Coloradoan. Direct ancestors founded Aspen, ranched around Gunnison, Steamboat. And I *loathe* this state. The political climate (and road congestion, massively-inflated real-estate prices, clogged backcountry, etc.) here is a mere generation removed from what’s going on in California today.

          I’ve lived in Wyoming and I can’t wait to get back. There’s something in the water there that seems to repel Californicators.

          1. A guy from Wyoming once joked to me that noone lives in Wyoming. I thought that sounds just perfect.

            1. Wyoming is the best state EVER! They shoot wolves! Need I say more?

        3. Don’t forget Texas. Austin is a lost cause, Dallas too, probably, and all the major cities are beginning to follow suit. Godawful morons fleeing the garbage heap they created only to swarm over to somewhere else and do the exact same thing all while complaining about gentrification, new apartment buildings, and all the other people doing just the same as them. Pathologically incapable of taking any responsibility, and hypocritical in the extreme.

      2. Well, you can always take economic advantage of their reliable, bankable stupidity. Buy up some cheap housing wherever they’ve begun their nonsense, wait a decade or two, and sell for triple.

        1. So Lex Luthor basically goofed by rushing the situation.

    2. this right here^ You’ve made your bed, now perish. Don’t drag the rest of us down with you.

      1. Scotty, re: the suffering and struggling Klingon empire: (upset) They’re dying!

        Kirk: Then let them die!

        I like to think they might learn from their economic mistakes, but won’t hold my breath.

    3. I am making a real GOOD MONEY ($550 to $650 / hr) online from my laptop. Last month I GOT chek of nearly 83000$,this online work is simple and straightforward, don’t have to go OFFICE, Its home online job.You become independent after joining this JOB. I really thanks to my FRIEND who refer me this SITE.I hope you also got what I…go to home media tech tab
      for more detail reinforce your heart….☛ http://earny.xyz/FNPghvS

    4. The fleeing Californicators remind me of the fleeing Muslims. The run from their terrible home only to land here and want to make it like the home they left!

      1. great analogy

  2. If only re-locating Californians would leave their policies behind… As is, they bring their politics with them, and are Californicating up, every state that they invade in any kind of substantial numbers! WHERE is Trump where we REALLY need him, putting up a wall all around California, and making Californians pay for it? Mexico paid for their wall, right? Just as promised by Trump? Well then, why not California the same?

    1. If only.

      They want to spread progressivism throughout the US so no one will be able to escape it by voting with their feet.

    2. We moved out of California. We mostly meet lots of Californians here who wanted to move to a more conservative state.

      1. ………to poop on.

        1. Essentially, yes. There’s a particular perversion among progressives now that verges on some form of acknowledgement that their cultish wokeness and entitled nature is bad, but actually it’s those other progressives that are bad and they are somehow different and better. Similar to how all those other johnny come latelys rolling into town are just so awful and ruining it for those that did the exact same thing not long before. It’s a curious kind of elitism; a snobbery within the blue state carpetbagger ranks that is bizarre and displays an utter lack of self-awareness.

    3. Leftists everywhere flee the *consequences* of their policies, but always make sure to back those same policies in their bags when they move.

  3. I’ve lived in seven states plus the District of Columbia and, quite frankly, the rest of the country seems drab in comparison to California.

    So, you’ve lived in 14% of states and have concluded, for all to see, that “the rest of the country seems drab in comparison to California.”

    I bet you also wonder why people hate journalists so much. Please, spare the rest of us and stay in California. We don’t want you.

    1. Most people have visited more states than they have resided in.

      Some people are smart enough to recognize the distinction. Others call the smart people “elites,” and fault the “elites” for preferring reason, education, tolerance, reality, inclusivity, and modernity.

      Carry on, clingers.

      1. Arthur L. Hicklib burps out NPC response #7.

        1. I just now realized that this comment was from Kirkland. I really need to be better about not feeding into the psychosis of the uneducated users.

          1. The rev is a parody account. Leftists are self important douchebags, but this guy’s too much. It has to be an act. Anyone who reads his posts would be repelled by his ideology. You don’t even see the other leftists on this site defending him.

            Probably working for trump/2020.

      2. and fault the “elites” for preferring reason, education, tolerance, reality, inclusivity, and modernity.

        Well, fortunately for you, Kirkland, that’s not a mistake you are likely, or even capable, of making.

        1. I do not fault people for preferring reason, education, tolerance, reality, inclusivity, and modernity. I prefer science to superstition, too.

          How about you?

          1. Is that why you parrot the same phrases in every shitpost?

          2. Oh, I certainly prefer “reason, education, tolerance, reality, inclusivity, and modernity”.

            Unlike you, Kirkland, however, I and others understand what those concepts actually mean. But keep trying, maybe you’ll get there.

          3. We prefer you blow your brains out with a shotgun as soon as humanly possible.

            1. Whoa, little buddy! Save some red flags for other people. The police can only take your guns once!

              1. Whoa! Hey there, little guy! Thanks for that concern there, bucko! Always ‘preciate that lookin’ out, slugger!

          4. People who prefer science to superstition generally don’t choose professions with Ecclesiastic titles or choose to wear clerical collars, nor do they choose such professions for their sock puppets.

      3. Hi, gecko!

      4. That’s not what he wrote. So, you’re just a moron that needs better reading comprehension skills.

      5. “…tolerance, reality, inclusivity, and modernity…” These haven’t existed in CA for decades, if they ever did. (I lived there for sixty years). Any efforts in that direction have been overwhelmed by decades of increasing bureaucracy and countless rules and regulations. But California DOES have the highest poverty rate in the nation by a comfortable margin. I guess that is something to be proud of?

        1. Perhaps you would be happier in Mississippi, AlbertP. Run by Republicans, populated by ready-for-replacement clingers. No Berkeley or Stanford, no Cal Tech or UCLA to threaten the populace with prospects for progress.

          1. LOL. Really? I DID attend a university in CA, and earned a Masters degree. The university/community college system is actually one thing that California gets right. Currently, it’s accessible to just about anyone who really wants a higher education, yet it costs just enough where it still must have “value” to those seeking such education. As it was then, 1990’s, it might have been the perfect balance between “cost” and “accessibility.” Of course, now, they seem intent to move for “free” college. The problem with that, of course, is that there are not “unlimited” seats available, so the universities will have to be more “select” in choosing who gets to attend. SOMEBODY it going to be left out. A whole LOT of somebodies may be left out.

            1. Of course, now, they seem intent to move for “free” college.

              Ain’t gonna happen.

              1. I would like to think it won’t. But, since I don’t live in CA anymore, and the handful of people I still keep in touch with there don’t have any kids who might be attending, I really don’t care.

                1. It’s attractive talk, but what the university system knows that the politicians and their supporters don’t seem to know is that the system we have in place now is already the “free” college system that was envisioned in the late ’50s.

                  The UC system only just got its budget balanced this year with a combination of tuition increases, donor solicitations, public-private partnerships, and the like. The state government and the UCs and CSUs have already been haggling over fees and funding sources for decades.

                  Someone just stepping in and saying “hey, let’s just make all this free!” will only inspire a brief fit of laughter before the ongoing funding discussions continue.

                  1. Exactly.

                    But what can one expect from folks who seem to be sold on the idea of universal, compulsory, and, of course, “free,” pre-school education. Hell, let’s take the parenting even more out of the child-rearing process, yes? Nothing bad could come from that…..

          2. What do you have against black people, Artie?

          3. Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland
            October.11.2019 at 12:10 pm
            “Perhaps you would be happier in Mississippi, AlbertP. Run by Republicans, populated by ready-for-replacement clingers.”

            Don’t like the weather, but if it is populated by people you don’t like, I’ll consider it.
            Insufferable, bigoted assholes like you are the reason CA has a bad name, you pathetic pile of shit.

          4. “Perhaps you would be happier in Mississippi, AlbertP.”

            AlbertP certainly doesn’t write like a black person, but it’s possible. I’ve heard that black migration from the north and west to places like Mississippi and Alabama, the homes of their (great) grandparents, is something of a trend.

            Real Californians may blame the Leftist Okies and Woodie Guthrie fans for California’s increasing list to the port side. (that’s left to you non-sea dogs) If these interlopers go back to the dust bowl, after all these years, they can at least take their communist inclinations with them.

            1. “AlbertP certainly doesn’t write like a black person, but it’s possible.”

              LOL. I just HAVE to respond. How the hell does a “black person” write? Seriously? Is there some linguistic metric whereby someone can determine race by how someone writes English? Geez Louise.

              1. “How the hell does a “black person” write?”

                If a writer is submitting comments to Reason, it’s fair to assume they are not black. A Trump fanboy submitting comments to Reason, doubly not black.

                1. LOL. Oh. I see. Well, I am definitely NOT a Trump “fan-boy.” Quite the opposite. So, then do I have a 50/50 chance of being black? I mean, I did grow up in Oakland (and not in “the hills” either). And, whilst in high-school, I was a big Motown fan. So, 60/40 odds?

                  1. ” I am definitely NOT a Trump “fan-boy.”

                    We’re in the minority here. I respect your right to be black if that’s what you want.

                    1. Well. For the record, since I don’t want to be accused of “cultural appropriation” since I sometimes play the blues on my banjo… and even eat gumbo, according to my DNA, I just might be the whitest person in the world. Hell, I’m probably whiter than Elizabeth Warren. Also, for the record, I am certainly not “special” just because I happened to be born in the heartland of this nation. I was just very, very, lucky.

          5. Perhaps the world would be happier if you drank a bottle of antifreeze then threw yourself in front of a speeding semi.

            1. Dude, were you violently beaten as a child?

              Are you a child being beaten RIGHT NOW?

              Because you are just deranged violent.

              1. YES! RIGHT NOW ALL CAPS!

          6. Oh, yeah! I especially love the progress that gives us electricity that can just suddenly be turned off for two or three days at a time! Man, gimme some o’ dat progress that requires me to have a backup generator installed at my house, like if I lived in Haiti!

            Seriously, don’t spend all of that progress in one place!

      6. Cling on carrier.

      7. Most people are smart enough to know you deserve to have your pin sized head stomped repeatedly against a curb.

        1. I guess your Thorazine shot wore off, and you managed to dodge the orderlies long enough to post on the internet again. Don’t stay in one spot too long, or they’ll find you! Quick, hide in the linen closet!

          1. Dude, your zingers just keep on flyin’! Your team of writers must be rakin’ in the awards!

      8. The self-nominated ‘elite’ have abandoned reason, scuttled education, mislabeled joyful celebration as ‘tolerance’, are allergic to reality, exclude anyone they differ with, and in the name of ‘modernity’ have embraced a political philosophy that spent the last century failing miserably.

        Nothing about the ‘elite’ is quite as revealing as their passion for electric cars; a technology that was first mass produced in 1886, which is far more damaging to the environment than the internal combustion engine.

        1. Haha. Look at how many responses the rev gets!

          He’s faking it, but he’s good!

  4. “We’ve reached the tipping point, where California’s progressive political imperatives are having such glaring real-world repercussions that it’s hard to keep ignoring them.”

    Some might say that ship has sailed.

    1. Has the predicted Black Plague epidemic hit LA yet?

    2. Not only sailed, but out at sea and sinking.

  5. I moved in 2015 from the oil patch, Kern County, to Houston. The differences are night and day. Gas always hovered around $3.50 in CA. It is $2.10 here now. No income tax here. No need to cringe in what is coming down the pike when the legislator goes back to work. In CA, it was always the new raft of bushwa concerning guns and the environment.

    1. legislature. sheesh.

      1. How stunning and brave of you to pick out a misspelled word in his post.

      2. My apologies. I was too quick on the trigger, and didn’t realize you were correcting yourself. A pox on reason.com for not having an edit feature.

        1. It does suck.

        2. Hey there, champ! It’s all hunky dory ya know!

    2. You are a brave soul, sir. Houston is perhaps one of my least favorite places on Earth. Everyone I know there was for Beto over Cruz, I wonder how they feel about that decision today.

      1. Houston Dems still own guns and loath income tax. Beto had no chance once he talked about banning guns. Even my died-in-the-wool Democrat sister knew that at the time.

    3. There’s an advantage to having a legislature that meets for 140 days every two years, and under the Texas Constitution has to spend most of its time balancing the biennial budget.

      Of course there are those who consider the opposite to be preferable; a legislature which meets for two days every 140 years.

      1. Texas legislature: “Can we call it a session now? I gotta sober up.”
        Cali legislature: “Does this bill make by ass look woke?”

    4. You’re not missing anything except the dry heat. Bako is steadily declining. It’s all about illegals’ rights these days. And college is only about illegals – especially the scholarships. Grade school is 80% Hispanic now – and that’s in rosedale (affluent area that white people go (before they move to Houston)).

  6. The rest of the country seems drab in comparison to California? You sound like someone who has never been to New Orleans during Mardi Gras. Or seen Old Faithful explode and gone bathing in its surrounding hot springs. Or gone fishing off the Florida Keys. Or gazed down into Crater Lake.

    There are plenty of non drab places in this country outside of California. Someday you should try being less of an arrogant jerk and go visit some of them. You might be pleasantly surprised.

    1. No, I get where he’s coming from. The first time I visited California, it was dazzling. I totally understood why people would want to live there, even with all the traffic. I even looked into going to grad school in San Diego.

      But that was over 20 years ago. I wouldn’t live there now if someone held a gun to my head.

      1. You’re not at all wrong that there a lot of breathtaking places in California. I’ve seen some of them too.

        My problem is with his contemptuous, dismissive attitude. I see the same exact thing from many New Yorkers. Many of them truly believe that New York City is the only place worth living in and everything west of the Hudson River sucks ass.

        1. Don’t challenge that attitude! It keeps most of those delirious people from wanting to leave their little bit of paradise.

        2. “My problem is with his contemptuous, dismissive attitude. I see the same exact thing from many New Yorkers. ”

          Places with sea ports are typically more liberal and cosmopolitan.

        3. Hmm, so all you Okies talking about bums shitting on sidewalks aren’t being a tad bit smug?

          1. Hmmmm, so not having bums shitting on your sidewalks is a bad thing? Cuz I’m, ya know, ok with it. I don’t know about smug, but it is kinda funny.

            Have a sense of humor, man! Or whatever.

      2. I was Southern California in the early 80s. Loved it.

        I wouldn’t live there now if someone held a gun to my head.

        1. Well, they might have held a gun to your head, to get your wallet, in the early 1990’s, but now they have laws and taxes which do the same thing, without all the icky mess.

    2. I believe what he meant is the geographical diversity. You can go from surf to snow in 4 hours. Deserts are close by for almost everybody. Redwood forests, farmland, cities, all closer than anywhere else I know of. If you want snow, live in the mountains; the beaches are only 4 hours away. If you want rain, live in the north; drier areas are only a few hours away. If you want sun, live in the south; deserts and mountains are only a few hours away.

      If you know of any similar places, do tell. Lots of places have some of the geography; I don’t know of any with all of them.

      Yes, the Proggies fuck it up. But that doesn’t remove the geographical attraction.

      1. “only 4 hours away.”

        Yep. In traffic. And another 4 hours to get back home. In traffic. Eight hours in the car- just how I want to spend my weekend. YMMV, of course.

        1. Doesn’t change the fact that no other state gives you that possibility.

          1. Didn’t say it did.

          2. Who cares, you can live in Atlanta or Nashville and be in the mountains in ETN/ WNC, and be at the beach, in 4-6 hours as well. So what if you cross a state line, I’ve never once had to show my papers

        2. You do know there’s a lot of California between the big cities, right? If you’re there for the geography, you can avoid a lot of that.

    3. It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World was filmed in 1963. The Ethel Merman character remarks at one point about “15 million people in California” The place filmed great back then even around Bakersfield it looked all sunny and clean. That was probably at it’s peak. I didn’t get to visit until the 80s and was really disappointed in the reality.

      1. Ethel Merman played the mother-in-law of Milton Berle. Berle’s character was the owner of the Pacific Edible Seaweed Company, doubtless a big laugh back in 1963.

      2. “It’s Lieutenant Hurwitz. Severe shell-shock. Thinks he’s Ethel Merman.”

  7. Perhaps this point does not need to be made to this audience, but the situation in California is not going to get better by any incremental reversal of California political climate. There will be a crash and burn, not soon but it will come. Then the Federal government will be asked to bail out California. Request may occur during the Ocasio-Cortez administration about 2038 or so. Bailout will occur since similar relief will have occurred for years by then for Puerto Rico, Illinois, Detroit, Baltimore, St. Louis, etc., etc. Oh well, at least I won’t live to see it.

    1. The state has a massive influx of Central American immigrants, combined with millions of greedy, self-loathing, mentally ill, hyper-neurotic white people that think the paradise they’re living in was created out of thin air and will perpetuate itself magically through the power of diversity.

      The irony is that once you get out of the coastal disease-vectoring areas, California is actually pretty red. Time to encourage the formation of the state of Jefferson and get them out of that abusive relationship.

      1. amen. Let their votes actually count for something.

      2. “The state has a massive influx of Central American immigrants, combined with millions of greedy, self-loathing, mentally ill, hyper-neurotic white people that think the paradise they’re living in was created out of thin air and will perpetuate itself magically through the power of diversity.”

        California Jews aren’t too shabby. They invented Hollywood, after all. Better than those awful New York Jews, at any rate.

    2. Let California go bankrupt, bust them down to federal territory status, then readmit to the Union in pieces.

  8. Democrats are thr problem.

    Why dies not the media point the finger where it belongs?

    1. Because the media are Democrats too. And they lie for a living.

  9. Even California’s notoriously overpaid government retirees are moving elsewhere.

    Why the fuck are these people getting paid by Californians to shit up the nice, low-cost of living, high-trust communities that they’re moving to out of state?

    If Newsom really wanted to reform government, he’d implement a “migrant” tax that carved off 80% of a retiree’s salary if they left the state. If these people want their money, they can stay in the pissed-on bed they created.

    1. “If these people want their money, they can stay in the pissed-on bed they created.”

      That, times 1,000.

    2. The State of California, always wanting to “maximize” its “profits,” used to tax the pensions of those who retired out-of-state. CA probably wasn’t the only State doing that. Pension income of non-residents has not been taxable by the States since, IIRC, 1996. I like to think it had something to do with that old, “taxation without representation thing.” Well, I’d LIKE to think that.

      1. If they’re getting a retirement check from the taxpayers, they don’t really have a lot of standing to complain about getting a haircut from the people who are providing them with a comfortable existence in a completely different state.

        1. Well, while the funding structure of State pensions in CA is abominable and untenable, hey, it’s a contract. And, given the nature of unions in CA, it won’t change until it self-destructs. Oh, and that “reformation” of the system a few years back was a joke, it didn’t begin to address the real problem.

          At one time, Oregon actually used to give a tax break to Californians who retired there, to help make up the income that they lost from those taxes. I guess Oregon realized that relatively well-to-do retirees can make a significant, positive impact on local economies.

          California needs to be a State where people retire “to,” instead of running “from.” It might happen after it crashes and burns. And, isn’t taxing people’s incomes who have no representation sort of “anti-American?”

          1. Taxing people to pay others to live out of state is pretty un-American, too, contract or no. At least if they were still in Cali, *some* of that money would be put back into the community.

            1. I agree!

              But, to see Oregon’s side of it, consider my case, that is, if the law was the same now and CA was taxing my pension as income — Oregon would be, essentially, paying me about $200 a month to live in their State where I will spend about $4000 a month. And, considering that they don’t have to cough up any State monies for my healthcare or any other support, and I am not taking up anybody else’s job, because I don’t work, it seems to be a pretty sound investment.

      2. Well, they could always repackage it as an “out-of-state retiree processing fee”. Fees usually pass most legal muster.

    3. Yeah, SCOTUS ruled on the ability to tax residents for moving out lack 200 years ago or so?

    4. Sounds likely. Gotta keep finding new people to rob, and the ones who won’t vote in CA anymore are a natural target.

      Escape CA before it implements the ExitTax.

  10. So, Mr. Greenhut has finally caught up with all the folks on the Right who have been pointing out the problems of progressive governance for decades. What took you so long?

    1. He finally wrote an article about it. Doesn’t mean he just thought upon it for the first time.

  11. “When I told my wife the exciting news, she asked if we were going to weigh the pros and cons of such a big move from our cozy Ohio town to sprawling Southern California. “No,” I answered. “There’s nothing to discuss.””

    Healthy marriage stuff right here.

    1. Probably a criminal offense in Cali.

    2. I wondered at that as well as someone who moved with their wife across state lines recently. We came to an accord after much discussion.

      That said, I understand where the author is coming from. A journalism job in California is a launch pad for a career, no matter how distasteful that might seem to some of us. It’s better than starving like most journalism and arts majors.

      1. I wondered at that as well as someone who moved with their wife across state lines recently.

        Did you leave Texas?

        1. Yep, now I’m in Colorado. One of the Republican districts with a heavy libertarian presence, even. Not that it really matters for statewide elections, apparently.

  12. I thought about moving. But I own a home here, and this is where all the techie jobs are. If a decent job opportunity came up I would definitely resettle. And I’ve thought about moving out when I retire, but I would be retiring to a place where I don’t know anyone. All my friends and family are here.

    But here’s the thing. I was born here. It’s my home. For some redstater to tell me to leave my home because there are more of one political party here than another is fucking bullshit. I’ve seen your states, you have your own problems. Different problems, but still problems.

    And it’s still a great state once you look past the inane government here. And it wasn’t always inane, meaning it might not always be this way. The problem is mostly San Fransisco and the some of the bay area. It’s way too lefty. But even Los Angeles is is fairly moderate when you count in the surrounding suburbs and tack on Orange County. Then you have San Diego and Fresno and Sacramento. The latter is not too bad after you discount the politician effect. East if Interstate 5 it’s a fairly conservative state. It’s an agricultural state. Endless orchards.

    So no, I’m not leaving. Unless a good job comes my way. This is still my home. My family and friends are here. I’ve got the best scenery in the nation. I’ll probably retire back to my tiny hometown in the middle of nowhere. Or maybe a tiny bungalow in some tiny coastal tourist trap. Still not too expensive in places like that.

    1. I was born there and left 30 years ago. Funny thing- at that time, all my friends and family were there but today, most of them have left. And the ones that are still there are planning their exit. Best scenery in the nation? It’s nice, to be sure, but there’s great scenery elsewhere- just get out and look around.

    2. You think you’ve got the best scenery? Here in Maine the leaves are turning. The world is a mix of green, red, orange and yellow. It’s amazing.

      1. And that’s it. No other place has the geographical diversity of California. The lowest and highest places in the 48 states are 60 miles apart, in California. (Used to be a foot race from low to high, but it’s been restricted for a while to only halfway up the mountain.)

        1. Washington state probably does. You can ski the top of mt. Ranier year round, head a few hours to the coast, hunt the rainforests around lake Washington, or cross the mountains to the east and be in a mountainous dessert climate similar to napa.

          1. From Washington, can confirm. Two hours in any direction gets you to the ocean, mountains, forest, or desert.

      2. I find there’s great scenery almost everywhere.

        For example, a lot of people rag on the Plains states for being flat and boring.

        Yet I am fascinated every time I cross the predominately grassy parts of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado and Montana, none of which are really all that flat.

        The lack of large stands of trees lets you really see the shape of the land.
        Its such an unusual thing as to be a wonder itself.

    3. My parents dragged me to CA just over sixty years ago. As some of the other posters have noted, other factors besides money tends go keep us in the same place. Growing up and spending the first 25 years in the SF Bay Area, and the next thirty years in the small cities, towns, and hamlets of Northern CA, well, it was really pretty cool. At least for a while. By the time the 90’s rolled around, the politics had become untenable, but, hey, family and friends still kept me here. However, once I retired, and with a little nudge from a fire which burned out the homes of most of my friends, and with my parents having passed-on, there was not one rational reason to stay. So, I traded a nice house in the mountains for a nicer house five minutes from the ocean in Oregon. Given the lower prices of almost every service and product, I actually save several thousand dollars each year. By “saving,” of course, I actually mean spending the money on new guitars, dinners, out, bling for the wife, etc.

      1. So, I traded a nice house in the mountains for a nicer house five minutes from the ocean in Oregon.

        If I were ever to leave, it would be to Oregon, or maybe Idaho.

        But I understand Oregon is not much better, from a political perspective.

        1. “But I understand Oregon is not much better, from a political perspective.”

          Actually, I had heard that before, as well. It’s overblown. Most of that “noise” comes out of Portland. Both the proposed carbon-tax as well as the gun-control measures failed to get enough support to have even a vote in the State houses. Is it “leaning” that way? Yeah, but it’s way behind California. (As one Californian observed, the Oregon coast is home to lots of gun-toting Democrats.) Violent crime is much, much lower, and homicide rates are about forty-percent lower than CA and the national average. All this without any of CA’s “common-sense” gun-control laws.

          I have spent time in Idaho — absolutely beautiful country. Every bit as beautiful as the Oregon Coast. But the weather here is a whole lot better. lol

          1. But the weather here is a whole lot better.

            That would be the deciding factor for me. From pictures I’ve seen, Idaho can definitely give CA a run for its money scenery-wise, but I’ve never lived anywhere where it snowed, and Idaho may a bit jumping-in-the-deep-end that-wise.

            1. To tell you the truth, if I was younger, I might well have chosen Idaho over Oregon, but being “over 65” I really didn’t want to deal with the cold and snow. I seriously considered moving there about twenty years ago, but couldn’t find a decent job or other opportunity. And at this age, I would rather play my banjo than shovel snow.

              1. I live in a small town in western Idaho and only get 10″ of snow per year. I won’t tell you where or you might want to move here!

                1. Oh yes, and I nearly moved to a place in Eastern Montana, where two feet of snow is considered “above average.” But don’t worry — I am now addicted to a “low” typical winter temp of about 40 degrees and where a summer high of 78 degrees is “blistering heat.” (Where I lived before the range was more like low-twenties to highs in the low 100’s.)

                  But do rest assured that, since my wife has never seen Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, or Yellowstone, that I will be sure to drop some cash in your State this coming Summer as we motor through.

        2. I always thought about Oregon, but Portland has become far crazier than San Fransisco could ever imagine. And Portland is big enough it can sway the whole state. So it’s just a matter of time before it becomes California North.

          1. I agree with you about Portland, in general, and, yes, it is just a matter of time, most likely. But, it is not inevitable, and I am not going to live forever, either. And Portland’s influence doesn’t seem to be nearly as strong, at least not yet, to the influence of CA’s combination of San Francisco, the Bay Area in general, and the LA megalopolis.

            1. For instance, the population of the Bay Area and LA area alone, not counting San Diego or Sacramento, amounts to over 1/2 the population of the entire State. Portland accounts for about 18% of the population of Oregon.

    4. I was born here. It’s my home. For some redstater to tell me to leave my home because there are more of one political party here than another is fucking bullshit.

      ^ This.

      If CA becomes a socialist dictatorship, I will join the Resistance before I move.

      1. California used to be conservative. The politics change. They can change again. It will never be redstate style of conservative ever again, butit can move way from the batshit insane SJW style progressivism. Hell, a good bankruptcy to the city of San Fransisco can turn things around.

        Most people in this state are NOT extreme progressives. They’re just like anyone else. And like everyone else, don’t think beyond the empty promises of the politicians. All it takes is a big economic nutpunch, or extended power outage, or homeless fiasco, and people start waking up. Hell, Schwarzenegger was lame governor, but the reason he as an R got into office in the first place was the shenanigans of the prior governor who got recalled.

        We still have Prop 13, and it won’t go away any time soon despite proggies wishes. It started the nationwide tax revolt that Reagan (a Californian) rode in on. We still have a constitution that demands an actual balanced budget. While the initiative system needs some reforms that will never happen, it still serves as a check on the government. It’s where Prop 13 came from.

        1. The politics change. They can change again. It will never be redstate style of conservative ever again, butit can move way from the batshit insane SJW style progressivism.

          Agreed.

          Most people I come across, even in the East Bay, are disgusted with the CA government and one-party rule, and find much of what happens here a complete joke. They’re just so put off by the national Republican Party that many people literally feel stuck with the local idiot Democrats.

          For example, I have yet to come many whose attitude toward the current crop of Democratic POTUS candidates isn’t “holy shit what a crop of losers, there’s no way these morons can defeat Trump.”

          A generalized realignment can only benefit CA.

          1. “They’re just so put off by the national Republican Party ”

            It’s not just parties. The personal is political.

            We’ve had a lot of geographic cultural sorting. Coastal big cities increasingly simply openly hate everyone in “flyover country”, and anyone culturally similar to them, and engage in relentless out group attack against them.

        2. “California used to be conservative. The politics change. They can change again.”

          California was changed by importing a replacement population. Where do you plan to import a conservative replacement population from? CA conservatives are moving on out.

          Countries are people. So are states.

          Import Not Californians, become Not California.

          It will be interesting to see how Mexico Norte turns out. I expect not well.

    5. ” And it wasn’t always inane, meaning it might not always be this way. ”

      Takes a lot longer to build a civilization than to burn it down.

      Good luck in Mexico Norte.

    6. Well now that this third world state is turning off power for days and I guarantee they will limit how much electricity you can make with your own generator. We had three fires form generators, more people will start leaving. BTW in this green state of California you have to prove a hardship to go off grid with your own electricity from solar panels. You have to be connected to the grid so you loose power when PG&E goes black even when you have solar panels

  13. The recent power outage shit isn’t helping matters. I’m hoping it will finally wake some people up over here. Probably not though. I think we need a major recession before the affluent white left that run the state get a clue.

    1. I read something from a guy who works as a cable installer in the state. He indicated that the issues with the power infrastructure are so much worse than people even realize. He went into this huge, long rant, so I won’t post it verbatim, but it boils down to California having something of a wildcat history with various companies installing cable and power lines over the decades, and nothing really being properly coordinated by the companies and local municipalities, or upgraded as time goes on, to ensure that cross-cabling and other shenanigans don’t happen. Combine that with California’s absurd environmental protection laws that give them the right to sue anyone that might cut down or trim back trees that are threatening power lines, because it might destroy the nest of some obscure songbird that probably deserves to go extinct anyway, and you have a great recipe for fires.

      PG&E deserves a lot of the shit they’ve gotten, but in many ways, the state made them the scapegoat for California’s own tremendously stupid regulatory structure that undergirds the entire mess.

      1. PG&E is a terrible bureaucracy, but holding them to blame for fires, especially the Camp Fire, is ridiculous. Any fire which can go from 0 to 70,000 acres in one day could have been triggered by anything — cigarets thrown out of cars, people shooting at transformers and insulators, anything.

        The real culprit is the damned greenies who won’t let the forests be thinned. I remember a picture of Lake Tahoe after being clearcut for the Nevada silver mines. Someone said those stumps were three times as far apart as the same area now. Whether that was 1/3 as many trees, or 1/9, I do not remember, but the problem is clear — the forests are too crowded, the trees are starving for water, and the damned greenies are to blame for the dry forests being such tinder boxes.

        1. ” I do not remember, but the problem is clear — the forests are too crowded…”

          Here you go. It’s Yosemite, not Lake Tahoe, but still…

          https://thefederalist.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/devore10.9.1-768×432.jpg

        2. The real culprit is the damned greenies who won’t let the forests be thinned.

          One out of many causes, another of which is PG&E’s neglect of maintenance, and dragging its feet on undergrounding their lines.

          The Camp Fire was also a bigger disaster because of transportation and notification issues – people were trapped by the time word got around.

          1. I was there, east of the town of Paradise, and signed up on three different “emergency notification” systems, I received not one notification. Had it not been for FB, and a neighbor who was up early working on his tractor, me and my wife might not be here today. Tt was a “perfect storm” of systematic failure: while I was driving through flames, at one point, literally, a tunnel of flames, and all fire and safety personnel in the area were driving the other way, into the fire, to help people get out, the 911 system was still reporting that there were no evacuation orders and no fires reported. When the fire reached the hospital in Paradise, they finally realized that something serious was happening.

            1. I was driving through flames, at one point, literally, a tunnel of flames

              Holy shit, man – that’s one for the grandkids! Glad you made it out!

              1. Yeah. Sometime after that, I realized that the ten-ply rated tires on my Jeep might have been one of the best investments I ever made LOL.

                When it was happening, however, I wasn’t even concerned: I just did what I had to do to get out. No fear at all. My wife, who was about five minutes ahead of me, with our cats on board, reported the same lack of fear or even serious concern. I have heard that from a few veterans who were involved in firefights, so I guess it’s not an unusual “non-reaction” to stress.

          2. “One out of many causes, another of which is PG&E’s neglect of maintenance, and dragging its feet on undergrounding their lines.”

            Need a cite on the first, and the second ain’t cheap; it takes getting the approval through the ‘boards’.
            And taking the heat for higher rates.

        3. “PG&E is a terrible bureaucracy, but holding them to blame for fires, especially the Camp Fire, is ridiculous. Any fire which can go from 0 to 70,000 acres in one day could have been triggered by anything — cigarets thrown out of cars, people shooting at transformers and insulators, anything.”

          This is absolutely true. But, the fact is, that PGE emailed us twice, and called us once, warning us that they were going to cut power the night before the fire, due to predicted wind speeds exceeding 50 mph. Note: Jarbo Gap, where the fire started, routinely has seasonal winds exceeding 70 mph, and on a least eleven occasions in the prior nine years the winds exceeded 100 mph, and once, reached 200 mph.

          The fact is, that, in this case, had PGE done what they said they were going to do, the town of Paradise would probably still be there, not to mention the 600 plus homes the fire burned through, in my area, on the way to obliterating Paradise.

          1. “on the way to obliterating Paradise”

            God has a sense of humor.

            1. Yeah, no s**t.

      2. “PG&E deserves a lot of the shit they’ve gotten, but in many ways, the state made them the scapegoat for California’s own tremendously stupid regulatory structure that undergirds the entire mess.”

        Yeah, I was displaced by the Camp Fire, and two of my neighbors died in it. The fault is with the entire system — PGE has been demonstrably reckless in maintaining their systems, whether it be natural gas or electricity. On the other hand, they are a utility, and, supposedly, can’t even sneeze without the government’s approval — at least that is what the public is supposed to believe. So, where was the State of California’s Public Utilities Commission when PGE workers were falsifying or altering work and repair orders? Was there nobody double-checking? I guess not. And now, of course, the State is posturing to “buy” the utility. Yeah, like that will be SO much better.

        1. > they are a utility, and, supposedly, can’t even sneeze without the government’s approval

          The flip side is also true. As a public utility they can fuck up major and still get away from it. The Camp Fire bankrupted them, but in the private sector bankruptcy means you’re out of business and your assets get sold off. But PGE is still going on like nothing has happened. They just have more lawyers running it now.

          1. As a public utility they can fuck up major and still get away from it.

            I can’t tell you how many jobs I’ve been on that they’ve fucked up. But they’re treated like government.

            “We said we’d be there on August 4 but didn’t show up until October 15? So?”

          2. “The flip side is also true. ”

            Absolutely. I have a friend who is a PGE customer — her rates have gone through the roof since the Camp Fire, and she lives over 100 miles from that fire. Last summer she paid over $300 a month in electricity for her 700 sq ft house. That is, literally, over three times what I paid in Oregon for a house over three times as big.

            I think the State of CA is going to authorize more PGE rate hikes to make it just …. almost …. profitable, by raping its customers, and then take it over and have the State operate it. Which, of course, will be an even bigger disaster.

        2. And now, of course, the State is posturing to “buy” the utility. Yeah, like that will be SO much better.

          If they buy it and then transfer ownership to local municipalities, I think it could be better. Not necessarily ideal, but better.

          Best power company I ever worked with was the City of Lodi. Put PG&E to shame. Ask people of Lodi what they love about Lodi, and many will mention the power and not having to deal with PG&E.

          1. I agree, generally, on municipally-owned utilities, but I have seen at least one so profit-driven that they make PGE seem like a charity. But, the rhetoric I have been hearing seems to be leaning towards State ownership/control over just about everything, with utilities the next big target. I don’t think they will be contented with local ownership, unless they, of course, own the local government lol

          2. I had both Edison and DWP when I lived in SoCal, and Edison was much cheaper. DWP salaries and pensions are insane.

            1. Los Angeles DWP? I think I may see the issue . . .

      3. There is some crazy infrastructure here. And it’s all the government’s fault, despite the infrastructure coming from semi-private agencies. It’s the government that sets up the perverse incentives.

        Most of the infrastructure in the state is fine, however. Get out of the crazy bay area and it’s not that bad.

        We have the technology for a feasible private market in energy, no natural monopoly required. But the proggies need to get out of the way to let it happen, instead of them centralizing everything even more than it is.

        1. We have the technology for a feasible private market in energy

          Trouble being, last time we tried that (as I’m sure you remember) the supply market was privatized, but as an end-user you still had to go through PG&E, whose rates were set by the PUC. So PG&E got to subsidize a private, for-profit supply market while its prices for the end-user were capped, which then led to the rolling blackouts that people still blame on “Privatization.”

          1. “Trouble being, last time we tried that (as I’m sure you remember) the supply market was privatized, but as an end-user you still had to go through PG&E, whose rates were set by the PUC. So PG&E got to subsidize a private, for-profit supply market while its prices for the end-user were capped, which then led to the rolling blackouts that people still blame on “Privatization.””

            Which is irritating…but fuck Enron was run by a bunch of ADD-addled chimps. They, more than anybody, had a lot riding on this working and they did as much as anybody to ruin the entire concept for God knows how long. This was one of those textbook cases of short-term profits obliterating the possible for long-term gains.

        2. We have the technology for a feasible private market in energy […]

          And those of us with the money to burn are working on it. Won’t be too much longer where a power outage doesn’t impact me.

          The problem being, of course, that poorer folk can’t escape the power companies as easily.

          1. The problem being, of course, that poorer folk can’t escape the power companies as easily.

            So they should continue to be forced to pay the higher rates for crummier service from the state-supported monopoly?

        3. “Most of the infrastructure in the state is fine, however. Get out of the crazy bay area and it’s not that bad.”

          Yeah, but with a few notable minor exceptions, like the Oroville Dam…… lol

      4. it boils down to California having something of a wildcat history with various companies installing cable and power lines over the decades, and nothing really being properly coordinated by the companies and local municipalities, or upgraded as time goes on, to ensure that cross-cabling and other shenanigans don’t happen.

        So… a lack of regulation?

        1. Haphazard regulation.

        2. I’m not an anarchist, so if you were trying to pull a gotcha, you failed pretty miserably.

    2. The recent power outage shit isn’t helping matters. I’m hoping it will finally wake some people up over here. Probably not though.

      I don’t know – the outrage is pretty widespread and vicious. On NextDoor, there are a few people doing the “first world problems, do your duty, Climate Change” chants, but they’re being shouted down by the “where the fuck is our money going” crowd.

      Unfortunately, due to the worst-of-both-worlds structure of our public utilities, a lot of blame is going to the ‘capitalist’ nature of PG&E rather to the ways in which PG&E is shackled by the government.

      1. The power outages hit the hills, and the affluent live in the hills. If it hit the lower class burbs like it usually does, no one would have noticed. But now it’s hit the affluent proggies where it matters.

        But you’re probably right. They’ll blame the “capitalist” power company instead of the government monopoly system.

        1. Yeah – we got shut down because I live in the sticks out by San Pablo Reservoir, but my neighborhood is pretty working-class. The anger amongst the working folk is a lot more tangible – it’s ironically the people in the hills who are lecturing us about first world problems and how losing your power in the name of Public Duty is a good lesson in how the “Global Other Half” lives.

      2. That big fire earlier this year (or maybe last) was blamed on PG&E’s failure to cut power.

        I don’t think it’s unfair to suspect that they’re making the current outtages far more painful then they need to, as a way to argue against that blame and avoid being responsible/liable the next time their power lines cause fires: “well, last time we cut power for safety, y’all revolted!”

        1. I don’t think it’s unfair to suspect that they’re making the current outtages far more painful then they need to, as a way to argue against that blame and avoid being responsible/liable the next time their power lines cause fires: “well, last time we cut power for safety, y’all revolted!”

          This is the dominant theory in my area, yes.

          1. But, can you really fault them? If I’m nailed with a massive fine due to not cutting power that “led” to a fire, I’m going to cut power quickly and over a massive area to avoid a repeat.

            Perverse incentives.

            1. Well, when everything is so terrible and unfair, ya gotta play some defense, I reckon.

              Haha

      3. Who could’ve guessed that suing a utility into Chapter 11 would result in power being cut?

        1. We were counting on them to do their duty.

      4. Well, isn’t that how socialism and fascism really work? The means of production and utilities are “privately” owned, but so completely ruled by the state that they fail. That allows the state to blame the private owners, and take their stuff. Obviously, I simplify.

  14. California is a wonderful place! Great housing, great schools, excellent social safety net, soon single payer healthcare, low taxes (low relative to all the wonderful free things you get)! The rest of the country is either flat desert or swamp, full of religious nuts carrying guns and shooting you on sight! Don’t you know it!

    Therefore, Californians, you should never leave California! Stay there and enjoy the diversity of creatures living on the beaches (human and otherwise), the marvelous outdoor culture that brought camping right into places like San Francisco, the sound of Mariachi and Muezzin blaring over large parts of the larger cities, and the elegant billionaire ladies and gents strolling down University Avenue while still retaining the vigorous and youthful thinking, politics, and lifestyle of their college days! You never have to grow up and never become an adult in California, you can just stay a rich, whiny 16 year old until the day you die!

    Californians, please never leave your progressive utopia!

    1. I’m saving the environment with my electric car and… oh wait.

    2. Nothing wrong with Berkeley that building a wall around their university can’t fix.

    3. Just waiting for some enterprising progressive attorney to file a federal lawsuit on behalf of those whose power was cut that such actions were not taken in a “fair and systematic” manner.

      Additionally, the lack of access to a reliable source of electrical power constitutes a abridgment of the rights of those affected under the equal protection clause.

      How many would love to see PG&E and the good citizenry of California to be put in that untenable position.

      1. To be sure, people of color and the trans community have been unfairly targeted for power outages.

        Everything is so terrible and unfair.

    4. The only useful things that ever came out of Berkeley are BSD and LSD.

  15. We’ve reached the tipping point, where California’s progressive political imperatives are having such glaring real-world repercussions that it’s hard to keep ignoring them.

    I’m struggling not to laugh because I know it’s wrong to laugh at retards, but damn you’re making it difficult.

    You do realize that every single one of those people fleeing the consequences of progressive policies has no fucking clue that there’s any connection whatsoever between the progressive policies and the consequences of those policies, right?

    A guy from California is feeling kinda horny so he asks a friend if he knows some place where he can get his itch scratched, the friend gives him an address and tells him, “Go to this place and knock on the door and tell them what you want and they’ll take care of you.”
    So the guy goes to the address, knocks on the door, and a voice on the other side asks, “What do you want?”
    “I want to get fucked”, the guy replies.
    “Okay, slip a hundred bucks under the door.”
    The guy slips a hundred bucks under the door and waits. And waits, and nothing happens. After a couple of minutes, he knocks on the door.
    “What do you want?” asks the voice.
    “I told you, I want to get fucked,” says the man.
    “What, you want to get fucked again?”

    There’s California.

    1. Alternatively, we have this little thing we say when we’ve screwed something up: “I don’t know what the problem is, I’ve cut this board three times and it’s still not long enough.”

      California doesn’t understand that that’s a joke. They seriously think that they if they just keep cutting the board, it’ll sooner or later be long enough.

      1. They seriously think that they if they just keep cutting the board, it’ll sooner or later be long enough.

        You’ll also have kept a union carpenter gainfully employed, so it’s win-win.

    2. What’s the difference between a California politician and an escort?

      The escort takes your money, screws you, and you feel happy.

  16. This is great news! With population in California dwindling, the demand for housing will necessarily be lowered, and housing costs should correspondingly start to drop. The market works!

  17. I’ve been to all 58 counties and still love the terrain, climate, culture and beaches. But if I were to get that call today, I’d have that long discussion with my wife before agreeing to move here.

    So when are you moving out?

    1. That’s not how the monkey trap works.

      If you’re familiar with the fable about the monkey who reaches into a narrow-necked urn to pluck out some of the dates stored within only to find that, while he can slip his empty hand into the jar, a fistful of dates makes it impossible to get his hand back out and now finds himself trapped so long as he refuses to drop the dates, you know this is something of an illustration of the sunk cost fallacy. (The Simpson’s episode where Homer got his arm stuck in a vending machine only for the responding firefighters to realize that he was “stuck” only because he refused to let go of the can of Buzz cola he had reached up there to get was the same thing.)

      If Greenhut had been smarter, he could have seen this coming long ago and bought up as much California real estate as he could while the perpetual-motion machine fanatics were still convinced that bureaucratic central-planning was bound to make California even more of a Paradise than it already was and sold it all at a huge profit at the first signs that reality was setting in.

      Instead, he’s now stuck, vainly waiting for things to get better so he can sell off his belongings and refusing to accept that things will get far, far worse before they ever get better. This is zombie terror attack time, just drop your shit and run for your life and don’t look back.

      But no, Greenhut’s going to wait, wait until enough Californians have fled to neighboring states that they’ve infected all the neighboring states and totally fucked up those places as well and then he’s going to decide he might as well stay in this shithole since everywhere else is a shithole too.

    2. Exactly, I’m so sick of this trope. Then they leave and they are surprised no one cares. Everyone who actually leaves and I hear about it on Facebook, I just look at them and think – you were always the kind of person no one could stand and no one wanted around. So maybe this purported Exodus is better for all of us. The only sad thing is, the Texans will keep sucking our tax money dry to pay for hurricane relief caused by their denial of global warming. Bye guys!

      1. The only sad thing is, the Texans will keep sucking our tax money dry to pay for hurricane relief caused by their denial of global warming. Bye guys!

        I’ll remember to laugh my ass off when your house is burned up in a wildfire or destroyed by an earthquake (when exactly is the big one supposed to hit? I want to see the entire I-5 corridor from San Diego all the way north to Seattle fall into the earth).

  18. Actions speak louder then words, and Reason is still based in California and many of it’s writers still live here.

    1. Yeah – same thing happened in 1991 after the riots and the CA population dropped for the first time in history. People started in with “this is it – people are giving up on CA!”

      Not that I would mind if roughly 20M or so people left the state, but I didn’t believe it then and I don’t believe it now.

    2. This made me chuckle, well said Escher.

    3. That’s pretty much what it boils down to. It’s nice that they have a front row seat to the state’s buffoonery so that we can laugh, too, but they could relocate to a less exceptional state easily.

    4. Reason is only still “based in California” on a piece of paper.

  19. Grew up in SoCal in the 1960’s. It was a wonderful place back then, with newly constructed freeways you could zoom on and beaches with few people on them.
    I sold my house a couple years ago and retired to a small town in Idaho. Haven’t looked back.

  20. It’s also the corrupt and high-priced electric utilities. It’s lack of water because not enough dams. It’s the little things, too, like straw and shampoo-bottle bans and the recycling fees for stuff that can’t even be recycled anymore.
    Don’t move to another state, though, until you find out what their residents are complaining about.

    1. “Don’t move to another state, though, until you find out what their residents are complaining about.”

      Usually, it’s about all those damn Californians moving in.

  21. Why mislead readers with platitudes like “progressive”? California was that in 1969, as was British Columbia, but it did not mean communist. Progressive is what magazines were when fascism and communism were the disputed Venn diagram in 1920s Germany. Communism and fascism are as alive today as then. Most people in the New World still think like Eurotrash, along a straight line from Stalin to Hitler with a looter mixed economy in between. Surely Reason is not falling back into that swamp?!

  22. Back when Reason was a pro-market publication, this article would have condemned the devastating effect of federal immigration policies on California farm labor. “Reason” would have condemned the effects of TraitorRapistNazi’s ‘easy to win’ trade war on the ports in California. It It would have condemned the repeal of the SALT tax deduction. (Tax cuts and exemptions are so good that Reason supports them without corresponding budget cuts!) But now it’s just Treason Magazine, and it’s just here to direct criticism away from the biggest grower of government (and authoritarianism) that Russian and Saudi oil money has to offer.

    As for those social conservatives leaving California: No one will miss you.

    And yes, we do need a serious opposing party to reign in stupid Democratic proposals. Unfortunately most members of the GOP in this state can’t string together a sentence.

    1. As for those social conservatives leaving California: No one will miss you.

      I’m not a social conservative, I’m a gay immigrant. It’s a shame what people like you have done to the place that was once a shining beacon of liberty and opportunity. Let me tell you, from the heart: may you rot in your own filth in California.

    2. And yes, we do need a serious opposing party to reign in stupid Democratic proposals. Unfortunately most members of the GOP in this state can’t string together a sentence.

      Talk about a self-own–“This is entire state is run by retards. All the smart people are figuring this out and leaving the retards to perpetuate their exceptionalism thanks the remaining retard residents.”

  23. Count me out! I reluctantly took a decade long contract at the depth of the recession and it’s almost up. Come 2020, I’m free of the oppression of Sud Cali! The clock is ticking until the contract is up but the instant it does, I’m out baby! I’ve also learned a ton and most of it lies in the fact that there it’s better to starve elsewhere than to even taste the warm hideous teat of Cali. I now understand why I got a contract that limited my ability to leave and I can fully extend my middle digit in their direction in just a brief few months.

    Time is a cruel mistress that brings such sweet salvation eventually.

    1. Oh, I forgot to mention that Gavin is free to fuck the horse he rode in on since we all know it’s his lifelong cream^H^H^H^H^H^Hdream.

      1. Washington state is the place where horse fuckers can do their thing legally. As long as the horse consents and doesn’t say ‘neigh.’

  24. I worked for the OC Register, and helped us win a Pulitzer. I left not long after, and since then have been in every state except Alaska, and lived in several. There is very little that would get me to move back to the People’s Republic, and even those things would be for a limited time, with the intent to return to the Free World as soon as possible.

  25. I think it’s certainly valid to point to regulatory regimes that increase the cost of home ownership/renting in California as a reason why people are moving away. These progressive enclaves need to get real, fast, on the need for new housing supply, if they’re going to do anything about outmigration.

    Still, it’s only half the story. States like Texas and Florida attract migration because of their lower local taxes, which are really just subsidized by money they receive from the federal government. It’s the classic red-state con – we’re open for business, we just spend other people’s money! There’s no question that has a strong incentivizing effect for people.

    It’s unfortunate that red states experiencing new growth will have to re-learn the same lessons that populous states already learned, which is that lax regulatory regimes have real consequences. Welcome to Texas! We won’t regulate you to death, unless you want an abortion. Instead of taxing you for mass transit, we build highways for everyone to drive on, using federal money. And good luck on the next hurricane!

    1. Still, it’s only half the story. States like Texas and Florida attract migration because of their lower local taxes, which are really just subsidized by money they receive from the federal government.

      Really? How does the federal government “subsidize” low taxes in Texas? This should be interesting!

      I mean, if you go by net balance of payments from the federal government, California and Texas are nearly equal (ranks 39 and 38, respectively). Other low-tax states (Washington State, Nevada, Florida) even have a net positive balance of payment.

      We won’t regulate you to death, unless you want an abortion. Instead of taxing you for mass transit, we build highways for everyone to drive on, using federal money.

      In other words, Texas actually spends federal money efficiently and wisely, while states like California waste it on mass transit, a money pit that serves mostly the well-off.

      It’s unfortunate that red states experiencing new growth will have to re-learn the same lessons that populous states already learned, which is that lax regulatory regimes have real consequences.

      Yes, the lesson that lax regulatory regimes make states wealthy; overregulation destroys the economy, destroys the social fabric, and causes people to move away and impoverishes states. After all, California’s infrastructure, traffic, education, and housing suck, and California has a massive problem with violence, racism, poverty and welfare dependency.

  26. A few months ago, there was a behind-a-paywall article in National Review that claimed the widespread belief that Republicans lost California because of Proposition 187 (which never went into effect) was a myth. Nonetheless, the author claimed that the California GOP can become viable again if they advocate for fiscal conservatism while making peace with the state’s social liberalism. Is the correct?

    1. A few months ago, there was a behind-a-paywall article in National Review that claimed the widespread belief that Republicans lost California because of Proposition 187 (which never went into effect) was a myth.

      I’d say Republicans lost California because Prop 187 failed to go into effect.

      Nonetheless, the author claimed that the California GOP can become viable again if they advocate for fiscal conservatism while making peace with the state’s social liberalism. Is the correct?

      No. The power structures in California are those of a third world country: an absurdly rich ruling class and their uneducated, dependent servants. The ruling class benefits from government spending tremendously, and the servants depend on it. The ruling class moves their riches out of the state and will leave should California ever crash. But they are also counting on the feds bailing them out.

      1. “No. The power structures in California are those of a third world country: an absurdly rich ruling class and their uneducated, dependent servants.”

        This is true. The whole state is a tale of two cities. The libs who proudly CA hold over red states as some blue city on a hill don’t realize that a sliver of the population contributes most of the revenue.

        A lot of the wealth isn’t even created in the state, because the big money comes from things like stock and intellectual property.

        1. Not to mention Chinese box office reciepts and manufacturing for their tech gazoos.

  27. Let’s build a moat around California. Preferably with alligators and snakes.

    1. Just about everything he said in this article is untrue of Tulare County California. We’re stuck with the gas prices, but little else. Home values are same as the Midwest and so are the politics. Plus we have that Central to Everything geography. Come join us!

      1. You still have the FTB, California’s social justice legislation, pension obligations, and all the other craziness emanating from Sacramento.

        Sorry, you’re screwed.

  28. We saw the handwriting on the wall in 1999 and relocated to the Dallas area. While we could afford to live in Marin County, we could never afford to retire anywhere near there. Also, the traffic is horrendous and will never do anything but deteriorate.

    This is the blog I wrote about our decision to move 20+ years ago.

    Enjoy.

    https://obliviots.net/1999/05/16/some-people-think-weve-lost-our-minds/

  29. Well, bye.

    Don’t let the door hit you in the ass on the way out.

  30. We here in CA also pay more than our share of federal taxes so we can bail out Ms and AL and supply money to the military so they can bomb peasants Who want to nationalize an oil field. Maybe we should stop doing that.

    1. Nigga, you don’t pay shit. You can’t even pay your mortgage.

    2. Well, you do NOW that deductions for state and local taxes have been limited. Before, CA was a beggar state thanks to those sweet sweet deductions enabling CA to tax as high as it wanted to while hiding the pain behind federal dollars.

      Not so much now.

    3. Don’t you liberals ever tire of this pathetic lie?

    4. So?

    5. Maybe you should stop being a retarded douche, but what are the chances?

  31. It blows my mind how people still vote Democrat or think progressive (we really need to stop calling them that) ideas are beneficial.

    In the past five years I’ve read so many crazy laws passed in California it’s a wonder they even function. I have an American buddy whose long life dream was to retire to San Diego. He has since changed that plan. Too crazy for him. He has lived here in Canada for 10 years and in his view, California is way more burdensome than anything he encounters here. Stew on that.

    Yet, everyone looks to California as if it’s a trailblazer. Personally, I just see a confused, one-party state.

    The other part about Californians re-locating. The sad part is they’re probably bringing their shitty politics with them that made them leave in the first place.

    ‘This time it’ll work!’

  32. People are leaving mostly because of high real estate prices, not higher taxes as several studies have looked at. Generally the more SUCCESSFUL an economy, the higher real estate prices are bid up.

    It’s a shame this article attributes the wrong reasons to make political points.

    1. Nope. Majority of those considering departure mention taxes.

      “Republicans and conservative voters were nearly three times as likely to have seriously considered moving as their Democratic or liberal counterparts — 40% compared with 14%, the poll found. The conservative voters mentioned taxes and California’s political climate as a reason for leaving more frequently than they cited housing.”

      https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-09-27/who-wants-to-leave-california-berkeley-igs-poll

      As to high housing costs, it just means one or more of these three things: 1) High demand, 2) Low supply to keep up with it, 3) Moderate demand but from lots of rich people.

      The low supply is cause by regulations, which make either new development either more costlier or outright impossible. And you guys have a lot of rich people around. That’s all it is. I mean, Vegas is pretty successful, lots people flocking to it these past years, and there’s a lot of money floating around, and yet housing in it is affordable.

      But you know what? If you’re fine with it, with the way California is right now, and if you enjoy living in it, then that’s cool. Some people are just more liberal and don’t mind the taxes and all that stuff. That’s the beauty of federalism – the lefties can have their progressive havens in Cali and Oregon, and the conservatives can have theirs elsewhere.

  33. One thing about California often overlooked is the water situation. California’s population exploded during an unusually wet era, but people there are conditioned to think that is the norm and the “drought” there now is some aberration caused by climate change. When apparently it is probably more just a reversion to the norm.

    “For centuries, California and the rest of the southwestern United States have been spared the multi-decade megadroughts that afflicted the region before 1600.

    “About a dozen megadroughts struck the American Southwest during the 9th through the 15th centuries, but then they mysteriously ceased around the year 1600.

    1. California only has “water problems” because it makes water way too cheap for farmers with “water rights” who then misuse it for desert farming water intensive crops.

      If California were to institute a free market in water, much of the irrational agricultural use would disappear, as would the water shortages. As a side benefit, a lot of the illegal workers would also leave.

  34. i like Californians but i from indo. beuatifull city

Comments are closed.