Hong Kong

Activision Blizzard Sided With Chinese Communists Against a 21-Year-Old Star Player

The gaming company suspended Chung Ng Wai for a year and confiscated his prize money after he said "Liberate Hong Kong."

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While everyone was busy dunking on the NBA and the Houston Rockets for kowtowing to China, gaming company Activision Blizzard stood up and declared hold my beer.

Blizzard owns Hearthstone, a popular online card game and e-sport. During a recent tournament, 21-year-old Chung Ng Wai—who goes by Blitzchung—was interviewed after winning a match. Chung is a Hong Kong native, and took the opportunity to declare, "Liberate Hong Kong, revolution of our time," with reference to the territory's ongoing struggle for political freedom from China.

In response, Blizzard killed the interview midstream. Then the company suspended Chung for a year. It also said he would no longer receive his prize money, which was about $10,000, according to Chung.

"Engaging in any act that, in Blizzard's sole discretion, brings you into public disrepute, offends a portion or group of the public, or otherwise damages Blizzard image will result in removal from Grandmasters and reduction of the player's prize total to $0 USD," wrote the company in a statement.

Blizzard also fired the two employees who were responsible for setting up the interview.

Needless to say, these were drastic steps. Blizzard's aggressive, punitive action toward Chung's dissent makes the Rockets' reaction to a similar incident of pro-Hong Kong sympathy look positively courageous: The team's owner merely put out a statement saying the team's general manager does not speak for the Rockets franchise or the NBA. It may not get as much attention, but what Blizzard did is far worse.

Both organizations are private entities, of course, and aren't obligated to extend free speech rights to their employees and players. But fans can raise hell about the practices of their favorite sports teams and decline to reward those companies that go out of their way to aid the Communist Party of China's crackdown on internal dissent and external criticism. In this case, Blizzard didn't just make some unfortunate compromises in order to maintain good-enough relations with China—the company actively aided an authoritarian government's efforts to silence pro-Hong Kong sentiment.

My friend Zack Beauchamp, a writer for Vox and regular Hearthstone player, has decided to boycott Blizzard games until they make amends to Chung. This seems commendable—especially considering that Bizzard's headquarters in Irvine, California, has a statue and plaque that reads "Every voice matters." Employees of the company, unhappy with its treatment of Chung, covered up the plaque yesterday.

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  1. Has anyone set up a GoFundMe to get this guy some prize money back?

    1. Unnecessary, a competing online trading card game has stepped up and given him the money that Blizzard took away. Also invited him to their tournament, but considering it’s an open tourney that’s not really a big deal.
      https://twitter.com/GodsUnchained/status/1181493536555880448

      1. The $10k is though.

        1. Definitely. And the public response was big enough that their servers needed to be upgraded to handle the influx of people trying out their game.

    2. Have Libertarians yet figured out that governments can use private companies as proxies to suppress speech, and that therefore “private entities” are every bit as inimical to freedom of expression as governments themselves are?

      1. Yes, we’ve figured that out long long ago.

        What do you think the Mafia is? It’s a private entity that routinely goes around coercing and initiating violence. I mean, duh!

        But the only way a company can *legally* engage in coercion and violence is with government permission. So in the end the problem is still government.

        In the case of Blizzard, they broke a contract with the competitors, and apparently did so due to their overly chummy relationship with a totalitarian government. Every honest libertarian ought to be boycotting Blizzard and raising a stink.

        1. “In the case of Blizzard, they broke a contract with the competitors, and apparently did so due to their overly chummy relationship with a totalitarian government.”

          Where was it reported that Blizzard broke the contract? The story seems to indicate it was the player who broke it?

      2. I’m endlessly perplexed by people who treat companies as though they’re immortal monoliths immune to all human action. So once again the libertarian will explain it to you:
        Private companies depend on their customers to exist. If a private company does something its customers object to, they will patronize another company. If everyone decided to delete their Facebook account tomorrow, Facebook would be powerless to stop them, and would swiftly go out of business. Only government possesses the power to compel use of a service, whether by directly forcing you to purchase health insurance, or by indirectly regulating a company’s competition out of existence. If the majority of the users of a service don’t care that that service is blocking your content, it’s you that sucks.

        1. American patronage isn’t necessarily required for large companies to be profitable. The reason so many are willing in bend over for China is because of how many potential customers you gain access to by being there. Nowhere near enough people here will boycott Blizzard or NBA to make it worth angering China. In fact, the market would punish these companies far more severely if they lost access to the Chinese market.

          You are correct that consumers can vote with their wallets and China has a lot of wallets.

  2. …the company actively aided an authoritarian government’s efforts to silence pro-Hong Kong sentiment.

    By firing to the two employees Blizzard seemingly not only aided Communist China’s aggressive message-controlling efforts but emulated their ruthlessness.

    1. On the China microblogging site Weibo, Blizzard’s statement in Chinese was: “We will, as always, resolutely safeguard the country’s dignity.”

      Well I will always, resolutely safeguard my monies dignity by keeping it from Blizzard.

  3. While we stand by one’s right to express individual thoughts and opinions, players and other participants that elect to participate in our esports competitions must abide by the official competition rules.

    Comments are disabled

    1. *Stands by one’s right to express individual thoughts and opinions*

      *Creates tournament rules that specifically outlaw expressing individual thoughts and opinions*

      1. After eight years of Obama ‘listening sessions,’ which invariably turned out to be high handed lectures, this comes as no surprise.

  4. Some voices matter – – – – –

  5. We MUST trade more with China. We need more American firms quashing the speech of others to bow and scrape to their true overlords, the CCP. Right, Reason?

    As John pointed out, China is not liberalizing with this increased trade. But we are heading more their way all of the time. Trade with China is a virus. It does not improve the US.

    1. Yep, we are not exporting liberty, instead our corporate titans are importing tyranny.

      1. instead our corporate titans are importing tyranny

        They’re more like invoked demons. When Senators need a specter to blame, a mystical legal incantation to enact, an illusory investment idea, or regenerative campaign contributions they invoke corporate CEOs.

    2. If Blizzard wasn’t squashing free speech on The Communist Party of China’s behalf, some other company would be, or the Party would do it itself. If we keep American companies out of China, it will do nothing to help the expression rights of Chinese citizens.

      1. But it could enable an even more oppressive technocratic communist regime. Are lower prices on your iPhone worth more efficient political crackdowns in China?

        If you give money to someone that tells you they are going to use that money to kill and oppress people, are you morally in the right since you didn’t kill anyone directly but just subsidized the killings?

        American’s say yes, we are morally justified because it’s not in our backyard and trade is good no matter who it is you’re trading with or what they’re taking under the table while you trade. Cheaper foreign goods are an unmitigated good thing, apparently.

        I hate to break it to people, but ‘free trade’ isn’t possible with Communist China. Period. So stop pretending what’s going on is free trade, or that any of the supposed truisms behind free trade apply to China.

      2. Shorter rchive: it’s ok to be garbage cuz others might be garbage.

      3. Not my job to worry about Chinese citizens. They can worry about themselves. I worry about Americans.

    3. As has been shown time and time again, the biggest enemies of capitalism are the capitalists themselves. Every economist since Smith has known this. Businesses are the worst enemies of free enterprise.

      The solution however, is the same as it’s always been. Restrict and bind the power of government. A market based totalitarian China is every bit as evil as a socialist based totalitarian China.

      The solution is NOT more power to the US government so it can wield power over US companies doing business in China. That just makes us more like China! Duh! The solution is eternal vigilance by individuals. Stop buying Blizzard games. Stop giving Blizzard money. Expose Blizzard’s shitty dealing with totalitarian regimes. If you work there, get your resume in order and start shopping it around. Plenty of tech jobs in Irvine. If you play one of their games, there are hundreds of others just as fun and interesting. Cancels your subscriptions and take your money elsewhere. Maybe you can’t break the company, but if enough people put their money where their beliefs are, we can make them feel the consequences of their actions.

      1. Yup. The true originator of most of the oppressive regulatory schemes in the United States currently are the corporations that championed them to block competition in their markets.

        This is why hotels ask the government to ban apps that allow people to rent their homes. It is why some of the major auto industries in the US supported fuel efficiency standards. It is why cab companies want to ban Uber and Lyft. It is why the insurance industry supported Obamacare so it would force people to buy their service. etc etc

        You will hear industries call for more regulation the moment any upstart gains steam.

        The biggest anti-capitalists are the corporations. And you are spot on the only way to combat that effectively is reduce the size and scope of government so they can’t buy it and use it as a means to enrich themselves.

  6. Corporations are required to maximize profits… even if that means sucking state cock.

    That’s market failure right there.

    1. That’s market failure right there.

      It’s more of a corporate or human failure that the market isn’t specifically designed to fix but frequently does anyway.

    2. Our the creators of South Park not part of the market?

    3. Brian
      October.9.2019 at 2:52 pm
      “Corporations are required to maximize profits… even if that means sucking state cock.
      That’s market failure right there.”

      You obviously do no run a business, along with being a fucking idiot lefty

    4. “Corporations are required to maximize profits…”

      Then why did they fuck up Overwatch so much?

    5. Corporations are NOT required to maximize profits. It’s up to the shareholders via the board of directors to determine what the purpose of the corporation is. And even if it is to maximize profits, it’s NEVER to maximize profits by illegal, unethical, or immoral means.

  7. I never imagined how corporate America which was so quick to get on the bandwagon of woke cancel culture could come to this.

    It’s a private corporation though. So… yeah.

    1. Corporate woke culture is very selective, from what I can tell. For example, they complain loudly about “the patriarchy” in the US, but in the Middle East, where women are routinely treated like garbage, they are conspicuously silent. It’s the same with China. I guess they don’t want to be seen as having “anti-Asian bigotry” for supporting Hong Kong residents against the mainland authoritarians.

      1. It could also be that they’re only after money and influence (but I repeat myself) and therefore simply adapting to local cultures to maximize returns. The further thought occurs that their tactic of playing all sides to advance their own interests are simply becoming more obvious in an increasingly connected world.

        1. If we were all communist there would be no corruption – Tony

        2. Or, it is more likely you’re making up lefty bullshit.

  8. If this kid doesn’t want to get banned, he can build his own Blizzard network and Hearthstone game.

    1. I wonder if Blizzard breached its terms of service by withholding the $10k.

      Civil suit?

      1. The contract language was something to the effect that anything said by a tournament member that Blizzard didn’t like means they could have their winnings withheld. It was really vague. I would hope that it wouldn’t stand up in a USA court but not sure where this tournament took place or the jurisdiction a case would be filed in. If China then this guy should be happy just not to be sent to an internment camp.

        1. Valid 230 protection according to most of the “but private corporation” people here.

    2. Exactly. When the socialists come and seize your property it’s your duty as a citizen to yield and continue producing elsewhere.

  9. What the Chinese government is doing to the Weagers is the same as what Nazi Germany did to the Jews. One can’t help wonder if today’s corporations would similarly be kowtowing to Nazi Germany If that situation were happening today.

    Or maybe I am missing something, because China is a trading partner and supposed friend, we must excuse all of their worst conduct toward their own people (Falun Gong, Hong Kong, the Weagers)…is that it? I get that if you have a friend who is cheating on his wife, you stay out of it since it’s not your business, but if your friend is kidnapping and murdering people, you also don’t say anything?

    1. One can’t help wonder if today’s corporations would similarly be kowtowing to Nazi Germany If that situation were happening today.

      They absolutely would and many actually did when the Nazis were in power.

      http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2001/04/hitlers-willing-business-partners/303146/

      1. Wasn’t Henry Ford famously pro-Hitler as well?

        And fascism was actively embraced by the FDR administration…
        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Recovery_Administration

        1. That does it, I’m smashing my f-150 and buying a ram.

    2. Uighurs, and I don’t wonder about how corporations kowtowed to the Nazis. They did, and so did many politicians in the 1930s.

      I guess so long as the Chicoms don’t build industrial sized extermination camps and lose a war of territorial aggression they can expect similar ‘accommodation’ from today’s ‘elites.’

      1. I guess so long as the Chicoms don’t build industrial sized extermination camps and lose a war of territorial aggression they can expect similar ‘accommodation’ from today’s ‘elites.’

        As Eddie Izzard pointed out so long ago, we don’t really mind if you kill your own people. Hitler’s mistake was trying to kill other people’s people.

    3. Weagers is more like what we called white kids that acted like gang bangers in high school. Uighur.

    4. Back in WWII, we refused to accept any Jewish refugees. Ditto for all of Europe. The Nazis were always evil, but our refusal to allow Jews to cross our borders directly led to the “final solution”. That was a failure of the government. Then many US corporations directly worked with the Nazis. Many did kowtow to the Nazis. Ford, for example.

  10. Money talks, dissidents walk; the plank.

  11. I usually think business boycotts are kind of stupid, but Activision Blizzard is just begging for it.

    1. There Facebook page has a bunch of come with screenshots of people canceling/deleting files. I just sent this article to 2 of my friends who liked their Facebook page. And yeah, I usually think boycotts are dumb as well. This is different imo.

  12. Blizzard was quite right to end the interview.
    Mr. Chung Ng Wai was engaging in counter-revolutionary behavior which warrants proper termination of such ugly statements.
    Free speech is a cancer on any proletariat paradise.
    It confuses the masses and harms the collective with impure political thoughts that could offend, anger and outrage the privileged oppressors who ensure there is calm and harmony in the beloved totalitarian society.
    But not to worry.
    You can be rest assured the Thought Police will come visit Mr. Chung Ng Wai and take appropriate action just like they want on American campuses with stern yet loving correctional action like whippings, starvation, beatings, torture and the beneficial firing squad later on.
    This is what is done in a modern, progressive society does to protect itself from such nefarious individuals bent on turning our socialist paradise into a capitalist hell hole.

    1. “It confuses the masses and harms the collective with impure political thoughts that could offend, anger and outrage the privileged oppressors who ensure there is calm and harmony in the beloved totalitarian society.”

      I see someone read Hillary’s review of 1984

  13. Blizzard deserves every bit of backlash they get from this thuggery, and then some.

  14. Activision was awesome. Still have the patches they’d mail when you sent in polaroids of the high scores.

    1. Played Pitfall for hours. Always nervous when those alligators opened their mouths.

      1. we got a version of Pitfall for a late-90s IBM it wasn’t as much fun

  15. Why stop at boycotting? Let’s go full out cancel culture on them.

    American society wants to permanently blacklist people who made racists/sexist/crude social media posts long before they were famous (and in the case of teenagers, knew better) and often realize the error of their behavior. Yet there are companies who make horrible decisions – more often than not discussed by and approved by multiple high-ranking executives – today and we are quick to come back when they take care of the immediate problem, with the lesson they learn being that they should not screw up so publicly next time. Should we be willing to overlook the fact that they made willful decisions to side with authoritarian governments?

    No, let’s cancel them.

  16. Interesting that libertarians are starting to wake up to how evil free trade is with anti-freedom countries. I wonder when they’ll start realizing that open borders policies that accept people from anti-freedom countries are just as toxic for freedom.

    1. Great point…except that this actually has nothing to do with free trade, regardless of its “evilness”

      1. Great point…except that this actually has nothing to do with free trade

        They both fall into the ‘Willfully naive shit libertarians believe’ category.

        1. This. See every Boehm article.

    2. Especially a proud country like China. They’ve abused the WTO quite a bit and show no signs of ever liberalizing in the Western sense.

      They have no concept of the rule of law. Worse, they seem to think it’s a concept that should be ignored.

      So yeah. Free trade with China won’t make them be nice. We tried that angle and time to rethink it.

      1. Worse, they seem to think it’s a concept that should be ignored.

        They don’t outwardly say they think it should be conquered and relegated to the dustbin of history but the axiom has been ‘hide your strength, bide your time’ for quite a while.

    3. Interesting that libertarians are starting to wake up to how evil free trade is with anti-freedom countries.

      If you’re “starting to wake up to how evil free trade is”, you’re no libertarian. The alternative to free trade is government-managed trade and that’s always a worse outcome. Private companies are free to decide to kowtow to China, you’re free to boycott those companies. When you’re demanding the government pass a law so that everyone else is forced to boycott the company as well, you’re the evil one.

      In this case, I think Blizzard (as well as a shitload of other companies) have badly misjudged their market and badly over-estimated the Chinese market, but that’s what you get from corporate bureaucrats who are playing with other people’s money. China’s never going to be the economic El Dorado so many companies seem to believe it’s going to be. Fuck China.

      1. This x 1000

      2. So you ignore the condition he added to the free trade statement? If you did, you admitted your ideal and simplistic view doesnt stand up to even basic analysis.

        Let me put it for you more simply. It isnt free trade when one side is actively trying to undermine the other through theft and dishonesty. Your view requires one to ignore reality.

    4. “Let’s make our fellow citizens and foreigners poorer by restricting voluntary exchange and increasing taxes. If we don’t, some anti-freedom countries might become more prosperous. Let’s also prevent the people who want to exit those anti-freedom countries from leaving. They need to remain in those countries and should not be able to engage in activities like freedom of movement or contract. If we don’t stop them, we’ll end up poorer and with less freedom. If we do what those naive libertarians want, they’ll end up with less freedom. So we need to make everyone poorer and less free, for freedom.”

      Pretty good summary of your points, wouldn’t you say?

  17. Fuck China.

    And Pop, Kerr and the NBA.

    Bunch of faux-intellectual phonies and their Orange Man Bad gibberish.

    Kerr withholding comment until he spoke to his brother in law who is a professor of Chinese history is about as lame as it gets and points directly to them being NPC drones.

    Have you been asleep the last 30 years there Steve? I thought you were ‘woke.’ As in awake.

    JFC.

    1. I’m amazed at the amount of “both sides” happening with this issue.

      On one side, you have China who wants the ability to extradite HK residents with no oversight. The same China that regularly disappears people in it’s custody, and is running literal concentration camps for ethnic minorities and political dissidents.

      On the other side, you have residents of Hong Kong who do not want to be extradited and disappeared by the Chinese government.

      Truly a case where you need to consider both sides’ viewpoint.

      1. Easy there fella. You just knocked those academic spectacles from Lebron’s face with that bit of sober reality.

        1. I’d have a lot more respect for them if they were just honest about not biting the hand that feeds. China’s checks clear, and as a business that is primarily what you’re concerned with.

          If LeBron was like “Do you have any idea how many sneakers I sell in China?” it would be much more of a case of “don’t hate the player, hate the game”. As you note, it’s the faux intellectualism that’s galling.

          1. If LeBron was like “Do you have any idea how many sneakers I sell in China?” it would be much more of a case of “don’t hate the player, hate the game”. As you note, it’s the faux intellectualism that’s galling.

            If libertarians weren’t so gung ho on “They’re just doing business with China, what’s the big deal?” I might agree. Instead intellectual libertarians weighing the pretty egregious sacrifices of freedom against the slim increases to economic prosperity, we’ve got the “Enriching socialist dictatorships is a universal good as long as we get free shit.” narrative.

            1. At least it’s consistent with their ‘open borders’ stance.

              Free trade and free borders.

              Incidentally, my friend is married to a Mexican. They used to visit a couple of times a year to see her family but no more because it has become too violent.

              When I asked him about Trump and the wall his eyes widened and said, ‘They absolutely need a wall.”

            2. Your comment is an example of the terrible reasoning exhibited by nearly every anti-trade person in the comments. You are conflating “China,” the people of China, and the PRC and selectively switching between definitions in order to make invalid trade-off comparisons that appear weak, then ascribe them to people in favor of trade.

              I don’t think it’s intentional or in bad faith, but it’s a very bad error and you should avoid it.

              Economic prosperity in China has competing positive and negative effects for the state, probably net positive for the time being. But the state was chugging along murdering tens of millions just fine before then. The economic gains of Chinese people in the last few decades have been enormous, and there has been a liberalization in many terribly evil policies – the one child policy is an obvious example.

              Your comment grouped “enriching the state”, “sacrifices to freedom”, and “slim increases to economic prosperity” in a nonsensical way. You talk about enriching the Chinese state as if it’s massive, sacrifices to freedom of Chinese people as if they are massive, and then economic benefits to Americans as if they are small. There are problems with each of these (e.g. the Chinese state is plenty rich in the first place, many authoritarian measures are *already* in place so it’s not clear a better economy demands “sacrifices”, your contention that the benefits to Americans is small is goddamn wrong and arrogant, exactly like a socialist telling people they don’t need choice and should be happy with a Trabant) but more importantly it ignores the great economic benefits to the Chinese people.

              If you care so much about the freedom of the Chinese, I wonder why you so quickly forget their material prosperity? I wonder if you care enough to allow them the choice of trading or not? Does the average Chinese person want trade or not?

              There are serious ethical concerns with some business dealings in China. Certainly that shit Google was pulling falls in that category. But that doesn’t mean we should restrict trade. Indeed, cutting off or restricting trade through law rather than market decisions also eliminates the signals that companies could generate by making the ostensibly pro-freedom choice in certain situations. The consequences are hard to measure because they involve complex human social dynamics, but without the basket of different signals we just get one stupid government-managed one.

              TL;DR Your comment is a stupid straw-man and you’re an apologist for central planning.

              1. “…The economic gains of Chinese people in the last few decades have been enormous,…”

                ^+1
                As the Chinese have it, ‘we no longer have to eat tree bark as we did’.
                The Chi Com government is thuggery incarnate, but by liberalizing the economy, millions of Chinese no longer starve to death.


              2. There are serious ethical concerns with some business dealings in China. Certainly that shit Google was pulling falls in that category. But that doesn’t mean we should restrict trade.

                Trade is already restricted, so I’m not entirely certain what the point of this is. It’s also not purely an ethical or moral concern, it’s also a pretty real national security issue. And not just for us, for China’s neighbors (and our allies) too.

                My main takeaway is this: If a trading partner isn’t acting in good faith, and is actively stealing from you, you revise or end the partnership even if it means you might need to retool the business.

                I’m not trying to force anything on anyone, but in a world where we don’t force that on people we’d need to admit that selling nuclear weapons to China would need to be legal. We’re quibbling over the details of the restrictions, not a world where there are all or nothing scenarios. That age is dead, for now.

                I think my big question is this: If China goes to war with an ally in the region, what happens to trade with China and American consumer goods markets? Mutually-Assured Economic Destruction. Or MAED theory (I prefer Mutual Economic Assured Destruction, just because MEAD is a word).

                <A HREF="http://nation.time.com/2011/10/10/mutually-assured-economic-destruction/"An old Times article that touches on the subject.

                1. <A HREF="http://nation.time.com/2011/10/10/mutually-assured-economic-destruction/"An old Times article that touches on the subject.

                  Hopefully I didn’t SF this link too.

                  1. I wish Reason would post a “here is the set of markup|markdown used by our comment software” FAQ.

                    War f*cks trade. Definitely a scenario worth considering but largely separate from the general discussion. General security matters lie on a tricky continuum in between, but a continuum that only has relevance to a subset of overall trade. Rent seekers and their tribal affiliates tend to want claim that subset is implausibly large, which is a reason to be very wary of the argument.


                    1. General security matters lie on a tricky continuum in between, but a continuum that only has relevance to a subset of overall trade.

                      While this is true, it doesn’t address the clearly anti-competitive theft of American technology to serve the interests of the Chinese central government and connected state owned businesses. The problem with China is that you’re just about always doing business with a state-owned venture, however well hidden it may be.

                      It’s still probably true that when goods stop moving across borders, tanks might, but it’s worth questioning how China managed to make up so much lost ground to become a technological military force that rivals our own. The general opinion is that Communists are terrible at innovation, but it would appear they are more than capable of stealing it through espionage or forced technology transfers.

  18. Blizzard can get fucked, but why did the 2 employees get canned? Did they know what Chung was gonna say beforehand and go ahead with it?

    1. Yes, before he spoke evidently (don’t speak the language) they said he has 8 words to say which was the exact number of words he said and then they ducked under the table.

      -paraphrasing from what I saw of video with commentators filling in the language issues.

  19. Employees of the company, unhappy with its treatment of Chung, covered up the plaque yesterday.

    Gutless millennial “protesters”, real dissidents would’ve spray painted the orc yellow and put a rockets jersey on the wolf too.

  20. Dangit, Blizzard, I was totally going to buy Overwatch on Switch next week, but now I don’t know.

    1. You do know. Don’t buy it. Fuck Blizzard. Free Hong Kong.

  21. Just went on their Facebook page. They are getting hammered. Very interested to see if they backstep like the NBA did.

    Between the 2 of them, this could be a watershed moment with China and our trade with them. More and more people are becoming aware of exactly what is going on between China and some of our corporations.

    But hey, as long as Little Jeffy can get some cheap shit, who cares about the Uyghurs or Hong Kong?

    1. It really makes one miss the ‘free tibet’ types of yesteryear.

      I guess it’s easy to forget images of the Chinese military gunning down Buddhist monks.

      I’m totes sure they’ve changed because we give them free technology that they turn around and integrate into weapons and populace surveillance though.

      1. I’ve been assured by the smartest people that trading with them is totally changing the way they deal with minorities and and free speech.

      2. Popovich: Free Tibet but not Hong Kong because NBA can totes woke up China.

          1. Save it for the morning.

            1. Might be busy in the morning. I do what I can do when I can do it.

  22. “In response, Blizzard killed the interview midstream. Then the company suspended Chung for a year. It also said he would no longer receive his prize money,”

    It also terminated all business with the two guys who INTERVIEWED him.

  23. It’s really weird that Little Jeffy hasn’t commented in this thread, no?

  24. Trading with slavers might turn out to be a bad thing?!?! Who knew?

    Thank Doge we get those cheap products.

  25. What a bunch of towels.

  26. I don’t play any Blizzard games. I they’re they’re stupid. The gaming equivalent of Budweiser or Coors. Ugh. So I don’t have to boycott them because they’ve never seen a dollar of mine.

    And now they never will. Doesn’t matter how good of a game they make in the future, I won’t play it. Period.

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  28. Remember guys- we should be supporting corporate right to free speech, especially when those corporations exercise their speech by clamping down on free speech of the users of their products in the USA.

    After all, the libertarian position is to endorse corporations that become the soft international enforcement arm of totalitarian regimes.

    The other day, Blizzard posted on Chinese social media something to the effect of we will protect the pride of China.

    This is what you wanted. Enjoy.

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