California

California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State's $4 Per Gallon Gas Prices

What could possibly be increasing California's gas prices?

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As lieutenant governor, Gavin Newsom supported a 2017 bill increasing the state's gas taxes. When running for governor in 2018, he opposed a ballot initiative that would have repealed that same increase. It's 2019, and Newson, now the state's governor, is demanding an investigation into why the state's gas prices are so high.

On Tuesday, the governor sent a letter to the California Energy Commission (CEC) asking that the state agency investigate the Golden State's roughly $4.03 per gallon gas prices, currently the highest in the country (and well above the national average of $2.86 per gallon).

"Independent analysis suggests that an unaccounted-for price differential exists in California's gas prices and that this price differential may stem in part from inappropriate industry practices," wrote Newsom in his letter to the CEC. "These are all important reasons for the Commission to help shed light on what's going on in our gasoline market."

Newsom is not alone in wanting answers to this difficult head-scratcher.

In January, 19 state legislators—17 of whom had voted in favor of that 2017 gas tax increase, while the other two had only entered office in 2018—sent a letter to State Attorney General Xavier Becerra demanding that the state's Department of Justice (DOJ) investigate the "unexplained gasoline surcharge" that was estimated to cost Californian families $1,700 a year.

California currently imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country. A state excise tax currently adds $.417 per gallon, a rate that will increase to $.473 come July. On top of that, the state imposes a 2.25 percent gasoline sales tax.

In addition, California has adopted a low-carbon fuel standard and a cap-and-trade scheme for carbon emissions which together increase the state's gas prices by $.24 per gallon above the national average, according to a 2017 state government report.

That same report maintained that, even after all these state-imposed costs were tallied up, California's gas prices remained above the national average, a finding that both those 19 state legislators and Newsom are using to justify their demands for an investigation.

Newsom, as mentioned, alleged there may be "inappropriate industry practices" at play.  State lawmakers, in their January letter, suggested the state's retail gasoline market might lack "robust competition" leading motorists to pay more at the pump.

However, a lot of the higher, non-government-imposed prices Californians are paying currently could plausibly be chalked up to normal supply and demand.

Local media reports point to the twin effects of increasing demand and springtime maintenance at the state's refineries as contributing to the price hikes.

The late March shutdown of a Valero refinery in the Bay Area added to the price hikes.  Something similar happened in 2015, when an explosion at the Torrance refinery in Los Angeles County caused the facility, then responsible for refining 10 percent of the state's gas, to close for over a year.

Prior to that 2015 explosion, California's "gasoline price premium tracked closely with our higher taxes and production costs," wrote Severin Borenstein, a professor at University of California, Berkeley's Haas School of Business in a blog post.

After the Torrance explosion, prices spiked, and then slowly began coming down over the next year, although they to this day remain higher than they were prior to that incident.

Industry representatives maintain that any difference in the state's gas prices can be explained by normal market forces, and of course all those taxes and regulations.

"The petroleum industry on the West Coast has been subject to dozens of independent investigations by government agencies, all of which concluded the dynamics of supply and demand are responsible for movements in the price of gasoline and diesel fuel," said Kevin Slagle, a spokesperson for the Western States Petroleum Association (WSPA), in a statement, adding that "state programs, such as cap-and-trade and the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, impact fluctuations in energy markets."

It should be pointed out too that high levels of taxation and regulation and a lack of competition in the state's fuel sector are not mutually exclusive explanations.  Government fees and red tape often have the effect of squeezing out marginal producers and retailers, giving remaining firms greater ability to raise prices.

And regardless of any "mystery surcharge" on California gas, the fact remains that state government polices are a huge component of the final price everyone is paying at the pump.

Indeed, in the case of the state's cap-and-trade scheme—where the state caps the amount of allowable carbon emissions, and then auctions off emission credits—the explicit purpose is to raise the cost of emitting carbon, and thus burning gasoline.

Absent these policies, the state's gas prices would be lower.

Clearly, for many of California's politicians, the benefits of state policies aimed at producing cleaner air quality, mitigating climate change, and generating more revenue for road maintenance and light rail expansions surpass the costs of higher gas prices.

If that's the case, however, Newsom and others should make that case to voters directly and explicitly instead of trying to appease motorists' anger by pointing their fingers at industry.

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168 responses to “California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State's $4 Per Gallon Gas Prices

  1. I have no doubt that a number of those buffoons in the CA state legislature actually have no clue that they are the primary cause for why gas prices are higher there.
    But Newsom is not a complete moron, he is a political animal. He wants it both ways: force gas companies to pay more and be regulated more (environmental vote) and then turns around and wants to investigate why gas companies charge more (the union, poor, “little guy” vote). He absolutely knows the score. And wants it that way.

    1. I still find it hilarious that he used to be married to Kimberly Guilfoyle, who is now dating Donald Trump Jr.

      1. She has great tits.

    2. The Left has always blamed dark conspiracies to explain why the economy does not operate in the way their theories say it should. Somebody is always colluding on prices, hoarding, hiding their true profits or some such so that it is not their fault when things go pear shaped.

      1. Kulaks, hoarders, and wreckers! What else would it be?

        1. The Kulaks always get blamed. Congress may yet discover that Trump is a secret Kulak.

      2. It’s just a ruse to distract the easily distracted from the real culprit.

      3. “Theories” might be a bit strong. “Wishes” or “hopes” is more accurate.

    3. Other reasons:
      High wages of refinery workers and gas station attendants compared to other states
      Transporting gas uses gas which apparently is expensive
      Building, environmental and seismic code requirements much higher than other states
      Taxes …. did someone mention taxes already?

      1. Here in Virginia over the winter, we were paying under $2 per gallon.
        But, we have been invaded by Democrats from the northern DC Bedroom communities. So now we have a Democrat Governor, who wears black face, but still gets 95% of the Black vote, a Black Lt. Governor, who had forced “consensual sex”, and they want to raise OUR gas taxes as well.

        California, here we come….

        1. Marion, VA checking in here. Hard to believe we’re in the same state as the NOVA crowd.

      2. Exactly
        Every step in the supply chain is more regulated, more taxed, and therefore more expensive in CA than in almost any other place. Of course the consumer is going to pay more

      3. You missed “special formulation for California gas.” This means we have an artificially small gasoline supply market. No one but California refiners make gasoline for the California market.

        When you restrict supply, prices go up. Wow, shocker there.

        What I want to know is if Hizzonor plans to do anything about this, other than complain to his supporters. Switching to a standard gasoline formulation would be a straightforward solution.

        1. Adam Smith’s invisible hand doesn’t care about your wokeness.

    4. Hopefully they become more transparent with real time carbon program costs as CARB has been reluctant to allow the supply chain to show the costs. LCFS and Cap&Trade are considerably higher now vs ’17 as programs targets are more stringent for ’19 and will continue to be harder to meet. Reasons for higher CA prices:
      CARB gasoline specifications> These are most stringent in the world. Basically low VoC target coupled with strict limits on olefins.
      Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS)> Mainly a CO2 reducing program applied towards transportation fuels like gasoline and diesel.
      Cap&Trade> Mainly a C02 reducing program applied against stationary stack emissions, like a furnace stack at a refinery
      CARB Regulation> Stringent reporting and enforcement leads to reduction participants, thereby reducing liquidity. This is a dynamic variable that is hard to quantify unless you understand the trading dynamic which academia (ie Professor) does NOT.
      Retail Gasoline Taxes> CA is $0.35/gal higher than TX.

    5. Gavin Newsom is a piece of ssshhit

  2. Add in the cost of just running a business in the state and the price seems reasonable.

    1. Are you ree todd did

  3. You suckers in PA are beating CA in gouging the taxpayer and your roads still suck. That should be investigated.

    1. Yeah, PennDOT is incompetent and says they need still more money to fix roads the right way. Plus we’re bankrupting the turnpike.

      Our problem is trucks–everything coming by truck to New England and NY and NJ comes through PA. They destroy our roads.

      1. Don’t the truckers pay for gas in PA and also all the tolls? But I have a solution anyway, BUILD THE WALL!

        1. Hell no, the smart ones gas up in DE where diesel is 30 cents cheaper a gallon. It’s one of the two classic blunders, “never get involved in a land war in Asia,” but only slightly less well-known is this: “NEVER buy fuel in PA.”

          1. I believe truckers have to file tax returns that report mileage driven in a state and pay a tax based on those miles.

            1. Really? First I’ve heard of that.

              I know some states (either WA or OR) thought about taxing normal car drivers based on miles driven. This was when we started realizing electric cars might cause gas taxes to plummet. The issue was how you accurately tell where the car was driven.

              I could believe trucks have different and special rules.

      2. In 12 years everything will move on magical electric trains at zero cost and zero emissions. And all the manufacturing and construction of those magical trains will have zero impact on the environment.

      3. Trucks still pay taxes based on miles they run in the state regardless of whether they purchase fuel in that state. Not saying they don’t destroy the roads, they quite obviously do, but it’s not as though they are using the interstate and not paying for it.

        1. The trucks destroy the roads here for sure. I’m a Yinzer n its actually just as bad in rural areas with high fracking traffic. But THEY PAY IMPACT FEES.

          It still comes down to the state (mostly, there are some municipal or federal roads) not making repairs in a timely manner. They have the money, our union labor-powered D.O.T. Just sucks ass at doing literally everything.

          I’ve actually stopped to tell penndot workers they were idiots and wasting my money for trying to use cold patch to fill pot holes in pouring rain.

      4. We fairly regularly drive from Atlanta to Syracuse and back. The shortest route involves taking Interstate 81 through PA. But we choose to drive up to Cleveland and over to Buffalo and PAY to use the NY Turnpike all just to minimize the distance traveled in PA. Largely due to the complete suckage of PA roads, but also so we never have to stop for gas, food, or anything else in PA.

        We’d similarly never do anything in NY state either, but family is family.

    2. I always point out that it is our Republican controlled state legislature that consistently raises gas taxes and turnpike fees, Lately they added the practice of adding roads to the “turnpike system” My butt hurts!?!?

  4. I’m in PA, with the highest gas taxes, and our pump price isn’t even cloe to CA’s. We’re about 15th, they’re number one.

    They deserve the mystery surcharge for being arrogant utopians.

    1. It’s not a mystery. They require their own special gasoline blend, so refineries have to have special columns and crackers and whatnot to refine gasoline just for California. That drives up the cost.

      1. Not to mention, CA environmental regulations + rampant NIMBYism probably make it impossible to locate new refining capacity for CA gas in CA.

        1. both Juice and Mattew are correct and it will be interesting to see if they get their way of no more oil extraction or production within California. there is no magical unicorn farts that will run Californias businesses

          1. Wait, what? I’m pretty sure the GND has subsidies for bean-based Unicorn feed.

        2. Not to mention, CA environmental regulations + rampant NIMBYism probably make it impossible to locate new refining capacity for CA gas in CA.

          Gas stations, as well.

        3. Plus:
          * Higher land purchase prices / rental / lease costs for the gas stations, wholesalers, distributors, etc.
          * Higher taxes and greater regulatory burdens (which affects all businesses in CA, including the gasoline refining, warehousing, distribution, and retail businesses)
          * Higher salaries for workers
          * Higher costs for maintenance and just about everything

          Throw in the already mentioned NIMBYism, higher sales taxes, higher gas taxes, special gas blends, inadequate refinery supply (and CA’s antipathy for extracting more of its own untapped gasoline supplies), and now you have more expensive gasoline than even Hawaii.

      2. Car and Driver interviewed a refinery manger some years ago for one of their columns. He said that their are sometimes more than three hundred variations of fuel RE formulation they are mandated to produce.p, and this can raise their overhead by more than $ .30 per gallon. That was some years ago, and it might be even more expensive now.

        Just getting rid of ethanol, which provides no tangible benefits in a modern ICE would actually save a great deal of fuel and lower pump prices significantly.

  5. Yes but the state is entitled to that money from taxes because of all the value in the supply chain that they provide. What has “industry” ever done to provide value to society?

  6. Those pinheads are planning to run the fossil fuel companies completely out of existence anyway, so why do they care?

    1. Maybe the oil industry should just stop selling fuel in California. And let the Californians all die trying to escape the state on foot.

      1. This would lead to multliple calls to “build the Wall!!”

  7. And California requires its own special gasoline blend, doesn’t it? That costs extra. So add that to the gas taxes and it’s no wonder at all why it costs $1 per gallon more than anywhere else in the country.

  8. Prices reflect not only supply and demand but risk and reward. Of course gasoline (and every other good) is more expensive in places where there’s the ever-present threat of expropriation by the government or by lawsuit. Who the hell would willingly do business in a hostile and dangerous environment for the same profit margins as a friendly and safe environment?

  9. Reason 12,947 why Environmentalism is a political movement, not a scientific one.

    1. It’s not about climate change or environmentalism, it really hasn’t been for a long time…it’s about socialist economic policy–redistribution of wealth.

      (OTTMAR EDENHOFER, UN IPCC OFFICIAL): Basically it’s a big mistake to discuss climate policy separately from the major themes of globalization. The climate summit in Cancun at the end of the month is not a climate conference, but one of the largest economic conferences since the Second World War… First of all, developed countries have basically expropriated the atmosphere of the world community. But one must say clearly that we redistribute de facto the world’s wealth by climate policy. Obviously, the owners of coal and oil will not be enthusiastic about this. One has to free oneself from the illusion that international climate policy is e nvironmental policy. This has almost nothing to do with environmental policy anymore, with problems such as deforestation or the ozone hole.

  10. This brings back memories of the good old days, when people complained about commodity oil prices being manipulated by big oil, and we should sue OPEC (in what court?), and how they were conspiring with GM to keep that 100 mpg car off the road that totally existed, but the patents were secret, or something.

    1. “There’s a car that runs on water! It runs on water, man!”

      1. there is its called a steam engine and requires wood or coal of fuel or radio active materials to convert

        1. Or you could separate the hydrogen from water to power it. Gonna need a big electric power source for that.

          1. Hey but let’s ferment corn and burn that. Yeah yeah corns a plant and everyone knows farmers don’t really need all those fancy fertilizers and pesticides. They just like wasting money because commodity prices are so good that farmers are rolling in the dough./sarc off

    2. And that electric generator powered by static electricity

  11. I suppose it is entirely possible that progressive politicians are just as stupid and ignorant as they seem to be rather than consciously malevolent and power hungry.

    1. Have you seen a group photo of the CA Legislature?

    2. Those four concepts are not mutually exclusive. The venn diagram may well be a circle.

  12. …just when you thought California politicians couldn’t get any more stupid…

  13. Not sure about that math. $1700 per family = $32.69/week. 32 gallons per week at $1/gallon more than the rest of the US seems high. Maybe if you assume every family has 2 trucks? Doesn’t everyone in SF use BART? Maybe they need a one car, one child policy?

    1. I agree, it seems quite high, Even being a former CA resident who drove a whole lot of miles, I didn’t save THAT much by moving to Oregon. On the other hand, if you figure in the increased fuel costs for the commercial sector, including trucking, busses, delivery vehicles, taxis, as well as government vehicles and rail, air travel, and what-not, all of which are passed on to the consumer, it might not be that far out of line.

    2. It depends on how much gas they burn while stuck in traffic. And the length of their commutes, and how many more miles the parents put on their cars to take their under-16 kids to all activities, and how much gas the kids with drivers licenses are burning just driving around.

      I don’t use 32 gallons a _month_, but Grand Rapids, MI is far different from LA or the Bay area. My job, my bank, three grocery stores, and at least 5 restaurants are all within 2.2 miles of home. I suspect the typical CA home doesn’t have _anything_ zoned commercial or industrial within that distance.

    3. The cost is more than just what you pay at the pump. Every good that is transported by truck will cost more to cover the cost of shipping it to the store or your home.

  14. Not one drop of gasoline should be allowed into California. They have good weather they should transport themselves on organic roller skates and solar powered pogo sticks. If worse comes to worse they can take the high speed train to nowhere.

  15. See that nice looking lady to the left of Comrade Gavin Newsom?

    He’s such a freak that he would rather tax and regulate than have carnal knowledge of the nice looking lady.

    Yes, it’s been said that the progTards can only achieve orgasm by taxing and regulating.

    1. “He’s such a freak that he would rather tax and regulate than have carnal knowledge of the nice looking lady.”

      Dunno about that. Grease-head (yes, he does ‘treat’ his hair with some glossy liquid; yuk) was more than happy to pork the wife of his chief of staff some years back.
      But since feelz are all that matters, he was forgiven since he said he was sorry.

      1. Sevo

        Thanks for the info

  16. So regressives are even confused by their intended consequences as well as their unintended consequences. It’s almost like they secretly they demand that any profits that evil corporations are making take up the slack off government meddling. Oh, well, the masks are off so it isn’t so secret.

  17. I do not understand what their problem is. Their stated goal has been to raise hydrocarbon fuel prices to discourage their use. Their policies appear to be working. They should be ecstatic.

    1. ^^ This

    2. You say this like cognitive dissonance isnt the State Flower of California.

    3. All that effort and they’re still only about halfway to the Obama administration’s goal of “European level” gasoline prices. Slackers.

  18. Jerryskids
    April.24.2019 at 2:41 pm
    “Prices reflect not only supply and demand but risk and reward. Of course gasoline (and every other good) is more expensive in places where there’s the ever-present threat of expropriation by the government or by lawsuit. Who the hell would willingly do business in a hostile and dangerous environment for the same profit margins as a friendly and safe environment?”

    Add that to Juice’s comment regarding the ‘special blend’, available from some very few refineries, and then figure in the number of gas stations forced out of business by the requirement for ‘updated’ storage tanks some years back (with no evidence of leakage), further reducing supplies.
    Why, it’s almost as if the high gas prices were an ‘unintended consequence’ of government requirements, sorta like ‘controlling’ rents to make them higher!

    1. you may recall years back that Govonor Gray davis required a certain fuel blend be added to gas. the gas companies sued to stop that requirement because they would have to install new tanks, they lost but the new required fuel tanks leaked so they had to be replaced and the government removed the new blend but sued the gas companies for putting it in in the first place. the state won in all cases

  19. too funny.

  20. Does California still require all gasoline sold inside the State be produced at in-State refineries, so they can monitor and require specific formulations and additives for its gasoline? Does it still effectively limit all additional refinery capacity increases while preventing outright the contruction of new refineries, artificially limiting supply and reducing competition in tandem?

    Yeah, I think there might be a few other factors adding to the price.

  21. Californians–electing socialists has consequences.

  22. Well, if gasoline is being priced incorrectly, all the government needs to do is pass a law pricing it correctly, and all will be well. Since the California legislature likes to name laws after people, they could call this one “Comrade Maduro’s law.”

  23. My suggestion? Just take that evil hydrocarbon to someplace else, like NV or AZ. Don’t provide any gasoline to anyone in CA. Don’t want it? Fine, we’ll take it someplace else. As far as the refineries in CA, we’ll shut down, terminate all of those union jobs, reduce the number of tanker trucks on the roads. We can do that.

    Be very, very careful of what you want…

  24. The California politicians are shocked. They thought if the gas tax would go up, the price of gas would go down!

  25. Ain’t that odd! State full of tree hugging commie hippy trash….bent on saving the planet…..and they STILL drive gasoline powered cars?

    1. they can always ban skyscrapers (NY) and live in tents and shit on the streets. Oh Wait..

      1. As usual, San Francisco is ahead of everyone. In this case, wrt the living “in tents and shit on the streets” thing.

        In other news, DiBlasio administration spokesmen said he was preparing to declare New York City officially “Utopia”.

        Author J.K.Rowling revealed on Twitter that the city had been gay all along.

        1. But does it identify as a city?

  26. 25 years ago I worked for an oil company. At the time California had a law that required that some percentage of all petroleum products sold in the state had to be produced from oil extracted in the state. I don’t know if that law still exists, but if it does then that is the answer to the question at hand. It is very expensive to extract oil in California, and the oil extracted is generally low quality. Low quality oil requires more expensive refinement. Add in high labor costs, stringent environmental regulations, and the high cost of land and… well you can see where this goes.

  27. Forgot to mention that California will not allow new oil wells in the state.

  28. In other news, the government demands an investigation into why there’s an area in the New Mexico desert near White Sands that’s radioactive.

    1. The Army Corps of Engineers has initiated a study, at the request of the respective governors, to examine the cause of flooding along the Iowa/Illinois border.

  29. screw that state anyways.

  30. According to Governor Newsom and the Democrats — California’s high gas prices are due to “inappropriate industry practices.” Not high taxes, not special blend mandates, not California’s refusal to allow a new refinery to be built for over 40 years, not California’s opposition to oil pipelines from other states.

    What Newsom ET AL are REALLY saying is that California oil executives are greedier than oil executives in the other 49 states. But if it were that easy for oil company CEO’s to unilaterally raise gas prices, would not the other 49 states suffer this same malady?

    Of course, the progressives have no answer for that. Just blame evil California business executives. The public LOVES such demagoguery.

    1. Preach it!

  31. Higher overhead, duh.

    A gas station in SF or LA may be sitting on a $5 MILLION dollar piece of land… Vs $100K in rural nowhereville, or $300K in some midwest or Texas city. Higher wages, higher every other tax.

    I’m sure that type of stuff easily makes up the whole difference.

  32. Kalifornia is a special kind of stupid.

  33. With all the oil that state produces, they are becoming more like Venezuela with each passing day. It was their idea to exit the union, seeing they won’t act on what clearly everyone would like to see happen, maybe the rest of the country should give them a (not so little) push in that direction.

  34. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In […]

  35. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In […]

  36. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In […]

  37. […] California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State’s $4 Per Gallon Gas Pric… […]

  38. They need an investigation?

    California currently imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country. A state excise tax currently adds $.417 per gallon, a rate that will increase to $.473 come July. On top of that, the state imposes a 2.25 percent gasoline sales tax.

    In addition, California has adopted a low-carbon fuel standard and a cap-and-trade scheme for carbon emissions which together increase the state’s gas prices by $.24 per gallon above the national average, according to a 2017 state government report.

    .41+.47+.24= 1.12

    Add that to 2.86 and you’re at 3.98. Add in that 2.25% sales tax and Taa-Daa!

    Without the ‘industry’ doing a fucking thing.

    What in wrong with these people?

    1. “What in wrong with these people?”

      More than we can imagine…

    2. Based on your example, I would have to say arithmetic is what is wrong with them.

    3. Two problems with the math in that example:

      1. Reading the text, you should conclude that the .47 is replacing the .41, not being added to it, as the equation purports to show.

      2. You can’t treat the result (even accurately computed) as comparative until you know the contribution of similar state excises to the national average price. Most states have gas excise taxes, so even if they are lower on average than California’s, only the difference is significant in the final price comparison.

      1. Knock it off. This is a California bashing area only, and the fact that 0.41 changes to 0.47 rather than adding them together makes the bashing harder.

        You’re not supposed to insist on arithmetic actually being applied correctly, California’s government certainly does not.

  39. California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into Why They Don’t Understand Economics – 12September.US

  40. Having recently lived in CA, I have ceased to be shocked or surprised by either the stupidity or the hypocrisy of CA politicians. Their major cities are a mess, their pension system is technically insolvent, and their tax burden is driving out, what was once, a thriving middle class. It’s going to get worse. My biggest concern is that somehow the rest of us are going to be forced to pay for their nearly 50 year record of bad choices.

    1. Nope. Having lived in CA for over 60 years, and recently moved northward, I have to say you are wrong: it’s much worse than you describe. 🙂

  41. Could it have anything to do with the fact that California is the nation’s most populous state and has more registered gas-fueled vehicles by a wide margin than any other state in the union? I find it hard to believe that the governor and legislature aren’t familiar with the law of supply and demand.

    1. We need to get rid of the electoral college so we can be governed by these folks.

      1. Sorry, Sukie, didn’t mean that at you. Was trying to post below.

  42. Newsom has a point – there’s something going on out here. Word on the street is the Benecia shutdown was sabotage and they retooled a couple years ago. I think there’s something geopolitical going on: Bolton the Walrus got the upper-hand but it means Japan can’t take Iranian oil, so someone’s got to provide oil to Japan, and you just cut supplies to California – it’s the Enron Golden State Piggy Bank all over again. Meanwhile you punish Newscum, Pelosi Mafiosi, Feinzion, and Kamala the Cameltoe.

    1. Where’d the tin foil hat come from?

    2. I’m guessing big Mark levin fan.

  43. I think there’s a special switch at the refinery CEO’s desk labeled “Refinery Fire”, which they punch on as needed…usual at spring during the gasoline formula changeover. 😉

  44. […] over $4/gal in CA…while the CA gov’nor, who supported a gas tax increase, is demanding an investigation into why gas prices are so high [eyeroll emoji]. […]

  45. Dont forget the fact that the rethugs decided it would be just fine to allow petro companies to sell refined products overseas.

    1. “Dont forget the fact that the rethugs decided it would be just fine to allow petro companies to sell refined products overseas.”

      Your tin-foil hat makes you look like a dork. But maybe you are.
      WIH would selling overseas have to do with CA gas prices? You think the overseas markets would buy the CA formualtions? Or did you even know CA requires special formulations?

  46. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  47. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  48. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  49. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  50. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  51. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  52. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  53. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  54. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  55. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  56. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  57. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  58. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  59. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what […]

  60. […] Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  […]

  61. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  62. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  63. Paying a hundred dollars or so more a year in gas prices is not enough for Californians to leave their progressive plantation, given that the state takes care of them at every turn. A third of the population is is on medicaid.

    If you have business in the state where fuel and healthcare costs are a real concern, then you are ignored. The kids who spend 8 years in tax funded schools don’t care about you and won’t let the right wing win by voting against taxes. The “rust belt” is anywhere in this country where real life concerns get pushed over by LGTBQ and imaginary cultural appropriation concerns. They’re thinning out and once the 1% suddenly can’t shovel revenue to Sacramento, the entire state will fall.

  64. […] Governor Gavin Newson is demanding an investigation into why the state’s gas prices are so high. But as Reason points out, it’s not all that difficult to see what that California politicians are the culprit.  In fact, […]

  65. […] California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State’s $4 Per Gallon Gas … […]

  66. […] But what is inappropriate is Newsom’s directive to the CEC. As Christian Britschgi drolly informs us at Reason, Newsom, while lieutenant governor, had “supported a 2017 bill increasing the […]

  67. […] And now the people in the Pyrite State are revolting. Governor Newsom wants answers, but for those all that he needs to do is look in the mirror: […]

  68. […] And now the people in the Pyrite State are revolting. Governor Newsom wants answers, but for those all that he needs to do is look in the mirror: […]

  69. […] And now the people in the Pyrite State are revolting. Governor Newsom wants answers, but for those all that he needs to do is look in the mirror: […]

  70. Marginal cost of labor is also higher in California which means gas prices have to be higher to pay employees. Owners also have to be able to pay their own higher cost of living expenses. It ain’t rocket science. High taxes, high regulatory burdens and high cost of living means everything is more expensive. And yes, a good chunk of it is the government’s fault.

  71. […] California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State’s $4 Per Gallon Gas Pric… […]

  72. […] industry practices,” and some legislators hint at a “mystery surcharge,” but as Christian Britschgi noted in Reason, the reason lies […]

  73. The problem of pollution from gasoline-powered cars was essentially solved when catalytic converters were put on cars back in the seventies. Other measures since, such as California’s special reformulated gasoline, were for the headlines and originated from agencies looking for something to do, whether productive or not.

  74. […] On Tuesday, the governor sent a letter to the California Energy Commission (CEC) asking that the state agency investigate the Golden State’s roughly $4.03 per gallon gas prices, currently the highest in the country (and well above the national average of $2.86 per gallon). –https://reason.com […]

  75. […] California Politicians Hike Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into Rising Gas Prices, Christian Britschgi, Reason […]

  76. […] In other news, California governor Gavin Newsom launched an investigation into why his state has the nation’s highest gas prices. Apparently, the gov forgot that he […]

  77. […] – Idiot Extraordinaire: California https://reason.com/2019/04/24/california-politicians-hiked-gas-tax-now-demand-investigation-into-sta…This Week’s Quote: “It’s too bad that stupidity isn’t painful.” —Anton […]

  78. […] me… yet.)  They want to control what we eat and drink, who gets how much money and why, how and where we travel, how teachers are allowed to do their jobs, the age at which children are […]

  79. […] taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales […]

  80. […] higher-than-most-places taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales tax […]

  81. […] taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales […]

  82. […] higher-than-most-places taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales tax […]

  83. […] California Politicians Hiked Gas Tax, Now Demand Investigation Into State’s $4 Per Gallon Gas … […]

  84. […] higher-than-most-places taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales tax […]

  85. […] cutting pot taxes would be a great idea, Newsom and the California legislature are so hot to find more sources of revenue these days that we should be skeptical about the bill’s future. Newsom has said that he wants […]

  86. […] higher-than-most-places taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales tax […]

  87. [… ] cutting pot assessments would be an incredible thought, Newsom and the California lawmaking body are so hot to discover more wellsprings of income nowadays that we ought to be distrustful about the bill’s future. Newsom has said that he needs [… ] https://foootball-blog.blogspot.com/

  88. […] higher-than-most-places taxes. The state “imposes the second-highest gas taxes in the country,” explained Reason’s Christian Britschgi in a recent article, and assesses a state excise tax and a sales tax […]

  89. […] Given that Democratic lawmakers who control the California Legislature recently voted to raise gas prices by hiking the state gas tax in 2017, a move that Newsom supported at the time as Lieutenant Governor, Newsom and Democratic lawmakers’ investigation into the source of high gas prices has been mocked. […]

  90. […] Given that Democratic lawmakers who control the California Legislature recently voted to raise gas prices by hiking the state gas tax in 2017, a move that Newsom supported at the time as Lieutenant Governor, Newsom and Democratic lawmakers’ investigation into the source of high gas prices has been mocked. […]

  91. […] Given that Democratic lawmakers who control the California Legislature recently voted to raise gas prices by hiking the state gas tax in 2017, a move that Newsom supported at the time as Lieutenant Governor, Newsom and Democratic lawmakers’ investigation into the source of high gas prices has been mocked. […]

  92. […] Given that Democratic lawmakers who control the California Legislature recently voted to raise gas prices by hiking the state gas tax in 2017, a move that Newsom supported at the time as Lieutenant Governor, Newsom and Democratic lawmakers’ investigation into the source of high gas prices has been mocked. […]

  93. […] cutting pot taxes would be a great idea, Newsom and the California legislature are so hot to find more sources of revenue these days that we should be skeptical about the bill’s future. Newsom has said that he wants […]

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