"Federal Judges Are Appointed for Life, Not for Eternity"

From today's Supreme Court opinion holding that a judge's vote may not be counted in an opinion released two weeks after his death.

|The Volokh Conspiracy |


From Yovino v. Rizo, just released today:

A judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the Honorable Stephen Reinhardt, died on March 29, 2018, but the Ninth Circuit counted his vote in cases decided after that date. In the present case, Judge Reinhardt was listed as the author of an en banc decision issued on April 9, 2018, 11 days after he passed away. By counting Judge Reinhardt's vote, the court deemed Judge Reinhardt's opinion to be a majority opinion, which means that it constitutes a precedent that all future Ninth Circuit panels must follow. Without Judge Reinhardt's vote, the opinion attributed to him would have been approved by only 5 of the 10 members of the en banc panel who were still living when the decision was filed.

[Detailed analysis omitted.-EV] …

Because Judge Reinhardt was no longer a judge at the time when the en banc decision in this case was filed, the Ninth Circuit erred in counting him as a member of the majority. That practice effectively allowed a deceased judge to exercise the judicial power of the United States after his death. But federal judges are appointed for life, not for eternity.

We therefore grant the petition for certiorari, vacate the judgment of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and remand the case for further proceedings consistent with this opinion.

UPDATE: Commenter Eddy suggests the lower court decision might have been a misinterpretation of Hebrews 9:27:

[I]t is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment ….