Marijuana

Uruguay Marijuana Legalization May Not Last Past Next Year, Regulations Unsurprisingly Failing

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Weed sign in Uruguay
Marcelo Agosta/flickr

Earlier this year Uruguay became the first country in the world to legalize marijuana, setting up regulations largely far stricter than those in Colorado and Washington, where marijuana was also legalized. Uruguay's regulations placed limits on how much marijuana could be bought and where and required registration for marijuana users.

Just 378 people registered as of last month, and why would there be more? Uruguay's president, Jose Mujica, who supported legalization even while warning of the illness marijuana use can lead to, is nevertheless term-limited.

The front runner to succeed him, cancer doctor Tabare Vazquez, also his predecessor, is excited about using the registry to "better know who uses drugs and be able to intervene earlier to rehabilitate that person."

Meanwhile, the other candidate, center-right Luis Lacalle Pou, is opposed to legalization. Uruguay's marijuana legalization experiment may not last much longer than Mujica's term.

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12 responses to “Uruguay Marijuana Legalization May Not Last Past Next Year, Regulations Unsurprisingly Failing

  1. The front runner to succeed him, cancer doctor Tabare Vazquez, also his predecessor, is excited about using the registry to “better know who uses drugs and be able to intervene earlier to rehabilitate that person.” Meanwhile, the other candidate, center-right Luis Lacalle Pou, is opposed to legalization.

    The state is thy God, and thou shalt have no other gods before it.

    1. Sing along and WORSHIP with me then!
      Scienfoology Song? GAWD = Government Almighty’s Wrath Delivers

      Government loves me, This I know,
      For the Government tells me so,
      Little ones to GAWD belong,
      We are weak, but GAWD is strong!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      My Nannies tell me so!

      GAWD does love me, yes indeed,
      Keeps me safe, and gives me feed,
      Shelters me from bad drugs and weed,
      And gives me all that I might need!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      My Nannies tell me so!

      DEA, CIA, KGB,
      Our protectors, they will be,
      FBI, TSA, and FDA,
      With us, astride us, in every way!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      Yes, Guv-Mint loves me!
      My Nannies tell me so!

  2. using the registry to “better know who uses drugs and be able to intervene earlier to rehabilitate that person.”

    Same reason why gun registration is largely a “failure” in the US.

    1. Marijuana sure makes people paranoid! As if registering with the government as a dope smoker will lead government officials to mess with you and threaten to ruin you if you don’t comply with their “treatment.”

      1. 1984-The User Manual

  3. Surely some foundation can fund a “green revolution” against Mujica’s successor, preferably one that the US government can’t coerce.

  4. Failure has always been a feature of the policy. The Uruguay’s affable hobbit president notwithstanding.

  5. Sad, but not surprising. The inevitable statement of legalization “not working” will also fall under that.

    1. When drug warriors proclaim that “legalization is not working” they seem to imply that everything in the universe that’s not explicitly allowed ought to be verboten.

    2. No, actually people will see that the 2 yrs. or so during which pot was legal did not cause the sky to fall. Plus, the registered users will be studied and shown to have suffered no ill effects. I don’t see how this can be bad in the long run.

      1. Plus, the registered users will be studied and shown to have suffered no ill effects.

        CDC does those studies all the time. (Instead of worrying about silly things like-you know-infectious diseases.)

        Funny how whatever they study always causes “ill effects.”

  6. Hats off to Tabare Vazquez. It takes a creative politician to take pot legalization and use it as a means to collect data on people.

    Expect US politicians to follow suit.

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