Back in May when Mitt Romney had all but secured the Republican nomination after a string of primary victories, I had listed five reasons why conservatives should still wish for a Romney defeat. These were:

One: As the author of RomneyCare and an abiding supporter of the mandate on insurers to cover pre-existing existing, he did not have the bona-fides to lead a “repeal and replace” movement against ObamaCare.

Two: The biggest issue facing the country is out-of-control government spending. The only way of cutting it would be if Republicans put defense cuts on the table and the Democrats entitlement cuts. But the one consistent theme in Romney’s otherwise unbroken record of flip-floppery is more defense spending. Thus he'll never be able to rein in government spending.

Three: You can’t expect the ultimate Wall Street insider to fight crony capitalism no matter how many clumsy platitudes he mouths to do just that.

Four: Romney’s victory this year will mean no semi-sensible Republican (admittedly a rare breed) would likely have a prayer of becoming a president for the next 12 years or so.

Five: GOP is in a state of intellectual flux with various strands competing for supremacy and requires someone with firm convictions to engineer a healthy synthesis.

And to these five one can add this sixth the wake of Romney’s disastrous 47 percent remark:

His tinny understanding of their positions will make conservatives squirm over and over and over again. The caricature he presents would force them to spend four years looking at themselves in a distorted mirror. This will pretty much decimate whatever is left of the conservative brand, abandoning the ideological terrain to liberals for years to come. Think about it as the domestic equivalent of the Soviet Union winning the Cold War and becoming the sole global super power.

Better to lose a battle now in the hope of winning the war later.

Feel free to add your own reasons, Dear H&R Readers, to this admittedly non-exhaustive list.