Briefly Noted: Books, Television, Museums, and More

Foie gras fight, quality of life vs. efficiency, the phony war between punk and metal, The Secret Life of an American Teenager, and the Newseum

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Media critics have had some fun at the expense of the Newseum, the glimmering new 250,000-square foot edifice on D.C.’s Pennsylvania Avenue. It’s true that the Freedom Forum–sponsored journalism museum—complete with a Wolfgang Puck restaurant and a 74-foot marble etching of the First Amendment—seems a bit ostentatious for an industry purportedly on its death bed.

But with all the pomp and vanity on display in Washington, it’s good to spare some veneration for the First Amendment and the press’s watchdog function. And the Newseum venerates well. It’s hard to avoid a pleasing sense of nostalgia while watching old TV coverage of the last halfcentury’s biggest stories as they were breaking. Another interactive display allows visitors to browse headlines dating back 500 years.

The Newseum imparts an appreciation for the media’s historical role in a free society. Unfortunately, it’s less convincing when it tries to persuade us that the journalism business has adapted to the information age.—Radley Balko

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  • Kyle Jordan||

    LEMMY!!!!!!

    Fuckin' A!!! \m/

  • Kyle Jordan||

    \

  • Zach B.||

    Other than Southern California, is there anywhere where the Metal and Punk crowds were truly different?

  • ||

    I am the one, Orgasmatron, the outstretched grasping hand

    My image is of agony, my servants rape the land

    Obsequious and arrogant, clandestine and vain

    Two thousand years of misery, of torture in my name

  • Gac||

    The punk and metal shows I went to in DC had very different crowds. Punk bands tended to draw much younger crowds (well, except for the Sex Pistols - average age for that show was almost as old as the band itself...), while the metal shows tended a bit older. Think high schoolers vs. college graduates...

  • ||

    You know, Epi, I never could get into Sepultura. But I cranked Slayer all the time.

  • ||

    That better be a joke, sage.

  • ||

    Annihilator...

  • Brett Stevens||

    The Dark Legions Archive (the net's oldest underground metal site) has recognized this connection for years: how Iggy Pop inspired early heavy metal, how Motorhead inspired punk, how Discharge and GBH inspired underground metal (Bathory, Sodom, Hellhammer, Slayer) and how metal then inspired bands like the Cro-Mags and Amebix.

    Good punk and good metal share an idea: society cut its own balls off out of fear, and now we live in dystopia, but this dystopia might be fun to destroy...

  • ||

    Jethro Tull is my favorite heavy metal band.

  • Brett Stevens||

    Epi,

    Is sage referring to the awesome "Orgasmatron" cover that Sepultura did around the Arise era?

    Sepultura is best understood in three eras: their early death metal stuff, from Morbid Visions to Schizophrenia; their speed metal/death metal crossover like Beneath the Remains and Arise; and their bounce-metal stuff, which has been everything since.

  • ||

    Is sage referring to the awesome "Orgasmatron" cover that Sepultura did around the Arise era?

    I was. And I dint know Epi would be so sensitive about it. I was big on Anthrax too, what of it? Before Joey Belladona left, that is.

  • ||

    Epi's just sensitive 'cause nobody mentiones stryper yet.

  • ||

    Epi's just sensitive 'cause nobody mentiones stryper yet.

    (head explodes)

    sage, I was just unsure whether you knew where the song originally came from. My bad.

    You guys know that Lemmy was originally in Hawkwind, right? That the song "Motorhead" was a song he wrote with and performed with (originally) Hawkwind?

  • ||

    Didn't know that, Epi. He used to be a regular guest on Headbanger's Ball back when MTV played music videos. What a character he is.

  • ||

    You guys know that Lemmy was originally in Hawkwind, right? That the song "Motorhead" was a song he wrote with and performed with (originally) Hawkwind?

    Tell me more, tell me more!

  • ||

    When I was a wee Bairn back in the early 80s, A Motorhead show was the only place where you would see mohawk punks and dirtbag metalheads enjoying the same concert.

    It's not that big deal of a deal now, but it was a strange sight back then.

  • Kyle Jordan||

    "Epi's just sensitive 'cause nobody mentiones stryper yet."

    Micheal Sweet had phenomenal tone on "To Hell With the Devil". Using Mesa/Boogie Studio and Quad preamps.

  • ||

    Punk struck the intellectuals as properly conceptual and arty; metal just seemed like brutal noise for brutes.

    Is it just me, or does is this statement completely backward?

    Tell me more, tell me more!

    I think Lemmy was originally a roadie (maybe a bass tech?) who got pulled into active duty in an emergency.

    Another tidbit: Hawkwind has 47 albums that all have the same 8 songs on them. They have other albums, but it's impossible to fine them.

  • ||

    find

  • Old Bull Lee||

    I was talking with a friend's dad who is a music teacher and thought metal was the most musically sophisticated genre of rock music besides possibly prog rock.

    I think the intellectuals prefer punk because (GENERALLY SPEAKING) it's 1) less testosterone-heavy and 2) more likely to have some kind of leftist political bent.

  • Barry||

    "Other than Southern California, is there anywhere where the Metal and Punk crowds were truly different?"
    Yeah; early-80s New Orleans. I can vouch for the thesis of this book: the metal kids were blue-collar catholics from the outlying parishes; punk kids were usually from Uptown old-money. The lines blurred in the mid-80s, but the revisionist take on Punk as some sort of revolt against the rich is total leftist hogwash.

  • ||

    "Who's cooler, Lemmy or God?"
    "Trick question, Lemmy IS God"
    -airheads

    I love Lemmy, but I will never understand the physiology of how he sings with the mic a foot above his head.

  • Justen||

    Punk tends to be more political than metal. In punk you'll find a lot of social commentary, much of it with a strongly anarchist/socialist bent that is appealing to liberal youth. Metal is occupied mostly with epic fiction, its commentary indirect and via metaphor rather than angsty cries of rage. There's no comparison really, other than that they are both loud, often angry, and use the same set of core instruments you find in all rock. A music fan who tries to contrast the two is missing the point as broadly as contrasting jazz with folk.

    On foie gras: it really is a disgusting practice, both from a humane and a health point of view, but regulation isn't going to solve it. Awareness will curb demand faster than regulation will curb supply, and as long as there are ducks and fat people with mouths it'll continue to get eaten. Okay, maybe that was a little harsh. Still, live by example.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Another tidbit: Hawkwind has 47 albums that all have the same 8 songs on them. They have other albums, but it's impossible to find them.



    And 3 of those 8 songs are "Silver Machine".

    The Hawkwind version of "Motorhead" is hilarious, especially if you only heard it after the Motorhead version. Sort of like hearing Blind Melon do "Sabbath, Bloody Sabbath".

  • Brett Stevens||

    Originally inspired by the National Day of Prayer that religious groups created to draw attention to their beliefs, the National Day of Slayer was thought to be a holiday on June 6, 2006 -- that's 6/6/06 -- but now it has grown.

    http://www.nationaldayofprayer.org/

    Thanks to support and enjoyment around the world, the National Day of Slayer is now the INTER-National Day of Slayer, and it happens every year on June 6 starting at hour six. On this day, metalheads worldwide stop the pointless activities of a boring world and listen to Slayer.

    International Day of Slayer is bigger than one nation, or even one band. It's a celebration of metal music through one of its most articulate spokesbands. It's also revelry in the spirit that makes metal great. So on June 6, stop everything... and listen to SLAYER!

    http://www.nationaldayofslayer.org/

  • Brett Stevens||

    Sage,

    Nothing wrong with Anthrax/S.O.D., or bassist Dan Lilker's grindcore project, Brutal Truth, which just released a new album (Lilker was also in Nuclear Assault, Hemlock and other bands).

    I got a chance to interview him for The Dark Legions Archive and was grateful for it. Smart, witty chap.

    I will always have a weak spot for thrash -- these were the original blurspeed punk/metal crossover bands like DRI, Cryptic Slaughter, COC, MDC, dead horse, Fearless Iranians from Hell, etc.

  • ..||

    a friend's dad who is a music teacher and thought metal was the most musically sophisticated genre of rock music

    Let me guess: his students take the short bus?

  • Hacha Cha||

    did Motordamned ever release their collaborations?

  • Billy Beck||

    "I think the intellectuals prefer punk because (GENERALLY SPEAKING) it's 1) less testosterone-heavy and 2) more likely to have some kind of leftist political bent."

    It's a lot more basic than that. Punk was an elevation of people who could not play or sing, precisely because they couldn't. It was the egalitarian impulse of the 20th century brought to popular music. That's why they loved it: because it was rotten.

    BTW: the very first true voice of American heavy metal was Blue Öyster Cult. Go look at history and think about it.

  • nike shox||

    is good

  • قبلة الوداع||

    thank u

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