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Absolute Zero May Not Be Coldest Temperature

Absolute zero is often thought to be the coldest temperature possible. But now researchers show they can achieve even lower temperatures for a strange realm of "negative temperatures."

Oddly, another way to look at these negative temperatures is to consider them hotter than infinity, researchers added.

This unusual advance could lead to new engines that could technically be more than 100 percent efficient, and shed light on mysteries such as dark energy, the mysterious substance that is apparently pulling our universe apart.

An object's temperature is a measure of how much its atoms move — the colder an object is, the slower the atoms are. At the physically impossible-to-reach temperature of zero kelvin, or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 273.15 degrees Celsius), atoms would stop moving. As such, nothing can be colder than absolute zero on the Kelvin scale.

(Hat tip to Reason commenter A Serious Man)

Source: Fox News. Read full article. (link)

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  • JeremyR||

    This isn't new, though, my thermodynamics textbook from 20 years ago had a bit on this.

    It's kind of creepy thinking about it, because it's like we've found an exploit (like in a computer game), only in the universe.

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